Most garbage disposal manufacturers provide a range of models to choose from with ever-increasing power ratings. If you do a ton of cooking and use your disposal frequently, then spending a little extra on a 3/4 or 1 horsepower disposal will absolutely be worth the money. Not only do the more powerful units shred through food scraps much easier, but they can also handle harder objects such as bones or meat scraps that might jam a smaller, weaker disposal. As mentioned before, powerful disposals are less noisy and they tend to have only occasional damages. However, one downside of having larger, more powerful disposal is that they will require more space. No matter what your habits, likes, and dislikes are, it’s always best to consult with a John Moore tech before buying a new disposal to make sure it will fit under your sink and perform how you need it to.
This new one some how makes it quiet when using the disposal. I have no idea how old the other one was, it was here when we moved in. It was flimsy and would let dirty water come up. Cleaning the splash guard and the drain it went into didn't help at all. The new is firm and sits in the drain level. My daughter was putting the old one slanted some to keep it in there. After 2 1/2 years it was falling apart. I wish I'd bought one when we first moved in. This is the first garbage disposal for me but now I've learned what to expect from it. I recommend this product and will buy another if I'm still here when this one starts to get flimsy!
Modern garbage disposal units connect to dishwasher drainpipes.  This enables dishwashers to expel leftover food scraps and residue that would otherwise accumulate in the dishwasher unit.  A common source of leaks is the area where your dishwasher and garbage disposal connect.  These leaks most often occur when the hose’s clamp is not secure enough and when the dishwasher hose cracks.  To fix this issue, simply replace the cracked section of the hose or tighten the clamp.
As the #1 faucet brand in North America, Moen offers a diverse selection of thoughtfully designed kitchen and bath faucets, showerheads, accessories, bath safety products, garbage disposals and kitchen sinks for residential and commercial applications each delivering the best possible combination of meaningful innovation, useful features, and lasting value.
2. Can my septic tank handle the load? Septic tanks are essential in the general installation and use of garbage disposals. If your home is hooked up to a septic tank, then the municipality that you live in may require you to upgrade your septic tank system if you decide to install a garbage disposal. A local building inspector will be able to tell you if you’ll need too. Also, you must take into account that you will be required to empty your septic tank more often.
If the unit is hardwired to the house then you have to use a screwdriver to remove the plate covering the wire connections on the disposal. Disconnect the exposed wires and then remove the plate covering the junction box on the wall. Untwist the wire caps securing the disposal wires to your home wires and set the disposal’s wires on the side. Twist the wire capes over the exposed wires in the junction box, put the wires into the junction box and reattach the junction box plate.
To be prepared, measure the distance from the outlet to the top of each disposal before you remove the old unit. If the new unit’s outlet is lower, you must also lower the tee that the discharge pipe connects to. Loosen the two nuts that connect the tee to the tailpiece above and the trap below. Try lowering the tee to see if the tailpiece is long enough. If it’s not, you’ll have to replace it with one that’s slightly longer.

Set the garbage disposal down where you can work on and see the rubber gasket. Peel off the old gasket and put the new gasket in the same place making sure that it pops into the lip and sits flat. Now you are ready to set the garbage disposer back in place. Use your knee or a helper to lift the disposal into place while looking down at it from above the sink to verify that the gasket sits flat before locking it back into place. Then look underneath the sink to make sure that all three mounting grooves are locked in. Reconnect the drains and plug the cord back in to test it for leaks.

A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 800 RPM motor-powered dual stainless-steel swivel impellers within this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal to make the grinding and draining of undesirable food waste a snap. A manual reset overload protector helps safeguard the disposer from damage ensuring operational longevity. With ...  More + Product Details Close


If your garbage disposal is making a clicking or rattling sound, there may be some food particles that will not grind up inside. Remove power from disposer, reach into the sink hole with a pair of tongs and remove anything that is still down in the disposer. Test your disposer to be sure the noise is gone. If not continue troubleshooting your disposer issue (see below).

Assuming that you have already given the disposal the time it needs to run and clear the garbage, you probably have a congested drain line. We don’t recommend using chemical drain cleaners with a garbage disposal. You will very likely just damage the unit and end up with a sink full of toxic chemicals that you’ll eventually be forced to clean out manually. If the blockage doesn’t go down with the good ol’ baking soda and vinegar remedy, then calling a John Moore professional is your best bet. He or she will know exactly how to properly remove the bolts, disconnect the drain trap and remove the trap and the discharge drain pipe, check for clogs and any other obstructions, and finally clear the blockage with the latest and best tools. (See our previous post about good steps you can take when your kitchen sink is clogged!)
If this sounds familiar, you'll be happy to know that replacing a disposer is really fairly simple. With today's plastic waste kits, leaks are seldom a problem and the electrical connections are similarly quick and easy. Finally, retail outlets sell good disposers for every household budget. Before you buy, though, it pays to check out your old unit to make sure it's not simply jammed.
Turn off the switch, unplug it, clear any debris inside the disposal, and rinse with warm water. Many times there is something stuck in the blades that they can't handle (citrus peels, meats, stringy vegetables, etc.). You may need to turn the blades manually to find a lodged object, and it may even be under the blade. Find the reset button (usually red) and hold it for 1 minute. Plug it in, try again. Some newer models do not have the reset button, there is an opening on the bottom of the disposal to insert an allen wrench. If not, look up your model by manufacturer or Google for further instructions.
Locate the circuit breaker that controls power to the garbage disposal, and flip it to the "off" position before continuing. Fix or replace the main seal if it is leaking. Remove both the drain pipe and the dishwasher hose, if applicable. Insert a screwdriver into the tightening ring and turn it counterclockwise. This will release the garbage disposal unit. Inspect the main seal that sits on the top of the unit. The seal is a large, soft rubber fitting that covers the top edge of the garbage disposal. If dirt, grit or food particles have fouled the main seal, wipe it down with a damp rag and reinstall the disposal unit. If the main seal is cracked, pitted or broken, it needs to be replaced. Once a new main seal has been inserted into the garbage disposal, push it up against the mounting bracket, insert a screwdriver into the tightening ring, and turn it clockwise to lock the unit into place. Reinstall the drain pipe and dishwasher hose, if applicable.

Some jams you can free and get the motor to spin and sound like it is working, but the blades are stuck in one position and can’t spin freely to do their job properly. This is very common problem – the motor works so we think everything is working. Not the case! This can lead to stoppages, food trapped in the disposal and a bad smell. These blades can’t be repaired. The disposal needs to be replaced.
A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.
Today, we are living in the modern world of light-speed schedules and convenience. Garbage disposals have become a time-saving, convenience. Though garbage disposals make disposing of foods a simple task, they often go overlooked or under appreciated. Nevertheless, when something goes wrong, we cannot fail to notice the foul smell coming from our garbage disposal units.
As a general rule of thumb, the heavier and bigger that a garbage disposal is, the more quietly it will operate – so long as it fits properly underneath your sink. Even though the sound dampening technology used in the design of garbage disposals has improved dramatically in the last 10 years, it is unrealistic to expect your garbage disposal to operate noise free. Under specific sinks, some disposals will be noisier than others due to the amount of vibration they produce. Ideally, you should look for a garbage disposal that features a nylon, insulated grinding chamber, like those produced by WasteKing.

We won’t sugar-coat it. This one is the doozy. If the leak is located at the bottom of the unit that means at least one internal seal has slipped, chipped, or flat-out deteriorated. The catch is, there are lots of these seals inside the disposal, and if one has failed it means the others are on their way. You can replace these seals with expensive, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts – or you can just get a new garbage disposal.
There you have it. If you have questions about this or any other home improvement project, be sure to read our list of Frequently Asked Questions for this video. And be sure to print out our Project Instructions, which includes a Tools and Materials checklist, before visiting your local independent home improvement retailer. That’s where you’ll find all the products and helpful advice to complete your project. If you’re not sure where to find your local store, check out our Store Locator.
Connect the new mounting assembly. Working in reverse order now, slide a rubber gasket over the bottom of the new sink flange, followed by a second metal flange. Position the new mounting ring last and insert screws into each of the open screw holes. Hold the assembly in place with one hand while you tighten the screws up against the lower flange with the other.[14]
So I know next to nothing about buying a garbage disposal, for the past ten years I’ve lived in huge cities and haven’t had any room (or necessity for that matter) to purchase one. Having recently bought a house, all that has changed. From dishwasher to washer to dryer to garbage disposal, I’m having to educate myself about them and purchase them with informed decision making skills. Yikes.

The Camorra was never a coherent whole nor a centralised organization. Instead, it has always been a loose confederation of different, independent groups or families. Each group was bound around kinship ties and controlled economic activities which took place in its particular territory. Each family clan took care of its own business, protected its territory, and sometimes tried to expand at another group’s expense. Although not centralized, there was some minimal coordination, to avoid mutual interference. The families competed to maintain a system of checks and balances between equal powers.[26]
The InSinkErator Badger 5 food waste disposal includes an exclusive, 'We Come to You' 2-Year In-Home Limited Warranty. This warranty includes free house calls (parts and labor) fulfilled through a network of 1500 professional service agents who are trained and certified to install, repair or replace InSinkErator disposers. Call our toll-free service line and we’ll provide you with the name and phone number of a factory authorized service agent nearest you.
Release the old disposal from the mounting ring. At the top of the unit you should see a thin metal ring with 3 separate lugs, or protruding arms. Take hold of these lugs with one hand and twist the entire ring counterclockwise about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) to dislodge the old unit. Set it aside on a sheet of newspaper or unfolded rag to keep from making a mess.[4]
Turn off the switch, unplug it, clear any debris inside the disposal, and rinse with warm water. Many times there is something stuck in the blades that they can't handle (citrus peels, meats, stringy vegetables, etc.). You may need to turn the blades manually to find a lodged object, and it may even be under the blade. Find the reset button (usually red) and hold it for 1 minute. Plug it in, try again. Some newer models do not have the reset button, there is an opening on the bottom of the disposal to insert an allen wrench. If not, look up your model by manufacturer or Google for further instructions.
Hold a noncontact voltage detector against the wall switch with the switch in the on position. The presence of electricity at the switch causes the detector to beep and flash. Leave the switch in the on position and hold the detector against the outlet beneath the sink. If the detector does not sense the presence of electricity at the outlet, the switch may have failed and electricity can no longer reach the disposal motor. Have the wall switch replaced.
Garbage disposers address the often disparate demands of convenience and conservation by grinding up kitchen scraps, especially non-compostable leftovers like meat and poultry or fat, and sending them down the drain to a sewage-treatment plant or septic system for handling, rather than to the landfill for slow decomposition. Our tests show that some disposers grind more quickly and finely, and are better at resisting jams.

Once you have a garbage disposer installed, maintenance is what keeps your unit going. By following this link, you will find a very easy to follow video which details some simple steps to help keep your disposal unit clean, and your kitchen free of bad smells and harmful bacteria. You see, my website isn’t just about telling you to buy this model or that right now or you’ll miss out on some good deals (although I have mentioned a couple of places you can take a look at if you’re interested), it’s about making sure you get the best from your garbage disposer.


STEP 7 – You may have stubborn object stuck in the blades that is preventing the motor from rotating. This means it is time to apply a little muscle. Get your handy allen wrench out and insert the tip of the short end into the hexagon shaped hole at the bottom center of the disposal. If it doesn’t fit, find or buy one that does. They usually come in multi-pack sets with various sizes to choose form. Your disposal might have had one packaged with it. if so, find it and use that one. Once inserted, rotate it a half-turn clockwise and then a half-turn counter clockwise to see if the mechanism inside the disposal will move at all. If so, it will help to move the blades back and forth a few times to force through the obstruction. After you’re done, restore power to the disposal and turn it on. At this point, your efforts may have helped your disposal to work again. If not, try one more time.
If some bad odors are coming from your disposal, it can mean that it is not chopping up the food finely and there are drainage issues. Try putting lemons peels (not wedges, y’all) through it first and see if that removes the odor. If that doesn’t help or if the smell returns frequently, that may be telling you that that the disposal isn’t swallowing and chopping up your leftovers correctly.
Russian activists have come under increasing pressure since Putin returned to office in 2012. Protests have been relatively scarce after the 2011-2012 Bolotnaya demonstrations in response to election fraud. Long-standing nongovernmental groups working on environmental and human rights issues, which relied in part on funding from abroad, have been labeled “foreign agents” by Russia’s Ministry of Justice.
Ensure the breaker that controls the garbage disposal is off. Inspect the inlet hose from the dishwasher. If the leak is coming from a crack in the fixture itself, the unit needs to be replaced. If the hose has cracked or frayed, unscrew the clamp and remove it from the disposal unit. Cut off the end of the hose with a utility knife up to the point where the leak began. Dishwasher hoses provide plenty of slack, so cutting off a few inches should not be a problem. Slide the hose back onto the fixture, and reinstall the clamp.
A garbage disposal unit (also known as a garbage disposal, waste disposal unit, garbage disposer, or in Canadian English a garburator) is a device, usually electrically powered, installed under a kitchen sink between the sink's drain and the trap. The disposal unit shreds food waste into pieces small enough—generally less than 2 mm (0.079 in)—to pass through plumbing.[1]
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