I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
Kitchen waste appliances are necessary for every home. You are able to quickly get rid of all types of waste with ease. First thing’s first, which type is better for your home – a trash compactor or garbage disposal? Many people think the terms are interchangeable, but they function in two different capacities. A disposal is great for getting rid softer food wastes, such as mashed potatoes, veggies, noodles, and rice. Harder to grind foods, such as chicken bones, vegetable peels and egg shells, are best suited for a stainless steel trash compactor. You can even place plastic and glass bottles in the compactor.
Watch the video below for tips on fixing your garbage disposal unit, including instructions for how to take it apart. If your unit still won't work, then you probably have a burned out motor or an electrical problem, which requires the expertise of a professional. This is when you'll want to call a plumber to replace your garbage disposal unit. It's a fairly difficult DIY project to replace your garbage disposal unit, but if you're up to it, here is a DIY guide for garbage disposal replacement.
There is a contradiction among some of the brands. InSinkErator’s disposal instruction manual states, “Don’t grind large amounts of egg shells or fibrous materials like corn husks, artichokes, etc, to avoid possible drain blockage.” Whirlpool’s disposal instruction manual states, “designed to dispose of food wastes including bones, fruit and vegetable wastes, pits, egg shells and coffee grounds.”
As it's a direct replacement, I didn't even bother to go through the hassle or removing the old sink flange and having to putty in a new one as the existing one was just fine. It took me about 5 minutes to replace old with new - that's why I didn't bother with a different make. I'm an average Joe who does a few things around the house - mostly accompanied by a lot of cussing - so anything that makes such work quick and simple results in less swearing - which is a good thing right?!
Trim the discharge tube as needed. If you’ve upgraded to a larger disposal or one of a different model, there’s a good chance that the discharge tube won’t be the right length to connect to the ground plumbing valve. Fortunately, this is a simple fix—mark the spot on the tube where it should line up with the drain pipe, then cut it to size with a hacksaw. It should be a perfect fit.[19]
There is a contradiction among some of the brands. InSinkErator’s disposal instruction manual states, “Don’t grind large amounts of egg shells or fibrous materials like corn husks, artichokes, etc, to avoid possible drain blockage.” Whirlpool’s disposal instruction manual states, “designed to dispose of food wastes including bones, fruit and vegetable wastes, pits, egg shells and coffee grounds.”
You can buy a 1/3-hp disposal for $80 or less, but our experts suggest that a more expensive unit with at least 3/4 hp would be a better choice. The more powerful the motor, the less chance it will jam. In addition, higher-priced disposals are generally quieter and have longer warranties. If you need to replace the splash guard guard as part of your garbage disposal installation, take a look at this guide.

But there is really only one rule you need to follow: Never put your hand or fingers down into the disposal, even if you think the disposal has been unplugged or its circuit has been shut off. If a disposal gets turned on accidentally while your fingers are in the opening, the likelihood is that you will end up with bruised fingers, not bloody amputation. But this is not a risk that is necessary in any way.
Last, but not least, as your garbage disposal system begins to age, it grows susceptible to cracking along its interior lining. When this shell develops cracks, water will begin to appear at its seams. At times, the leak can be observed from the bottom of the unit, particularly from the reset button. If this is the cause of your garbage disposal’s leaks, then there is no method of repairing other than replacing the whole unit.
If your garbage disposal just won’t turn at all, then it’s very likely that the disposal has lost power. Your unit may have blown a circuit, or it could be unplugged. First, check the plug for your garbage disposal to ensure that it’s secure. Next, locate the reset button on the underside of the unit, and push it. If neither of these things fixes the problem, look inside your electrical panel for signs of a tripped circuit.

Garbage Disposal Repair or Replacement

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