If your garbage disposal just won’t turn at all, then it’s very likely that the disposal has lost power. Your unit may have blown a circuit, or it could be unplugged. First, check the plug for your garbage disposal to ensure that it’s secure. Next, locate the reset button on the underside of the unit, and push it. If neither of these things fixes the problem, look inside your electrical panel for signs of a tripped circuit.
The origins of the Camorra are not entirely clear. It may date back to the 17th century as a direct Italian descendant of a Spanish secret society, the Garduña, founded in 1417. Officials of the Kingdom of Naples may have introduced the organization to the area, or it may have grown gradually out of small criminal gangs operating in Neapolitan society near the end of the 18th century.[3] However, recent historical research in Spain suggests that the Garduña never really existed and was based on a fictional 19th century book.[4]
If the disposal is plugged in and doesn’t need to be reset, then you should check the circuit breaker. The breaker could be flipped, which would mean your disposal isn’t getting power. If that’s still not the problem, then either the outlet is dead, the circuit breaker is malfunctioning, or the disposal needs to be replaced. Check the outlet first by plugging something else into it. If the outlet works, try replacing the circuit breaker switch. If that isn’t it either, you have to replace the disposal.
This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed with features that deliver great performance. The High-Torque GrindPro Magnet Motor can grind through waste. Continuous-feed operation uses a wall switch to activate the stainless steel grinding system that is resistant to jamming and corrosion. Our sound guard design reduces noise level ...  More + Product Details Close
We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
Waste disposal units may jam, but can usually be cleared either by forcing the turntable round from above or by turning the motor using a hex-key wrench inserted into the motor shaft from below.[25] Especially hard objects accidentally or deliberately introduced, such as metal cutlery, can damage the waste disposal unit and become damaged themselves, although recent advances, such as swivel impellers, have been made to minimize such damage.[citation needed] More problematic are drain blockages caused by shredded waste that is fibrous, e.g., artichoke leaves, or starchy, e.g., potato peelings.
If this sounds familiar, you'll be happy to know that replacing a disposer is really fairly simple. With today's plastic waste kits, leaks are seldom a problem and the electrical connections are similarly quick and easy. Finally, retail outlets sell good disposers for every household budget. Before you buy, though, it pays to check out your old unit to make sure it's not simply jammed.
Michele Zagaria, a senior member of the Casalesi clan, was arrested in 2011 after eluding police for 16 years. He was found in a secret bunker in the town Casapesenna, near Naples.[44] In 2014, clan boss Mario Riccio was arrested for drug trafficking in the Naples area. Around the same time 29 suspected Camorra members were also arrested in Rome.[45]
Garbage disposals first appeared in households in the 1930's and 1940's. These appliances, which are installed under a kitchen sink, can make a cook's life easier by trapping and shredding food waste items, allowing it to pass through the plumbing system. Although these popular appliances make cooking and cleaning much more convenient, they do require regular maintenance to keep them running at optimal performance. When it is time to replace your garbage disposal's blades, you can save time and money by doing it yourself.

The General Electric 1/3 Horsepower Continuous Feed is a relatively small unit. One of the most important measurements with garbage disposals is the size of the grind chamber. In this case, it’s 26.5 ounces. Power, at 1/3 horsepower, is at the lower end of the scale, but this is a light-duty machine. The owners we surveyed were very happy with the General Electric’s performance.
Once you have a garbage disposer installed, maintenance is what keeps your unit going. By following this link, you will find a very easy to follow video which details some simple steps to help keep your disposal unit clean, and your kitchen free of bad smells and harmful bacteria. You see, my website isn’t just about telling you to buy this model or that right now or you’ll miss out on some good deals (although I have mentioned a couple of places you can take a look at if you’re interested), it’s about making sure you get the best from your garbage disposer.

Waste King 9930: 1/2 horsepower garbage disposal with pre-installed power cord and sound insulation. Energy efficient permanent magnet motor and stainless steel swivel impellers reduce jamming. Durable, all-metal mounting assembly. Rust and corrosion-proof glass-filled nylon grind chamber and drain housing with stainless steel grinding components. Continuous feed technology. Front-mounted reset button for easy use. Safe to use with properly-sized septic tanks.

4. Is installing a garbage disposal worth the additional water expense? On average, a modern faucet runs 2.5 gallons of water per minute, or 900 gallons per year based upon the average annual household usage in the U.S. Depending on how often you use your disposerl, your home’s water usage, and water bill, will rise. This is one factor you’ll need to consider before deciding whether or not to buy a garbage disposal.


Run cold water while the disposal is on. Keep disposer and water running for 30 to 60 seconds AFTER the waste matter has cleared your drain. The waste still has a distance to go. Cold water keeps the motor, bearings and shredder assembly from overheating. It also lets the waste go down easier because the water is pushing it down. Don't use hot water, because it can melt fat and allow it to re-solidify as a blockage further down in the drain.
After watching this video, I decided I could replace my garbage disposer myself. Honestly, I think your site completely misrepresents how VERY difficult it is to hold up a 20+ pound disposal unit firmly up against the mounting hardware as you are literally crammed under your kitchen sink and then try and somehow get all three tabs to slide into place. I was very disappointed and, after 4 nights of trying and retrying, finally just called a plumber. Please don’t show anyone lifting something that is big and heavy and make it seems as light as a feather. Shame. Shame.
Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person.
Disposers fasten to the sink drain fittings in a number of ways--some use threaded plastic nuts, others large hose clamps--but the mounting-ring assembly shown here is the most common. To remove the disposer, support it from below and rotate the large, 3-tab mounting ring at the top counterclockwise until the unit falls away. Remove the remainder of the drain assembly by loosening the three bolts and prying off the retaining ring. Push the drain out through the sink hole and clear away any old caulk or putty.
After using the lowest cost disposers for over 20 years now, I find the newest models have not withstood regular use for more than 5 years. The older models had a blue housing where this next step-up model has a black housing which I am hoping for at least 5 years use. Our oldest (blue housing) disposers have lasted at least 5 years and some are now almost 20 years old.
I bought this two years ago when planning a kitchen remodel for our retirement home. Since I was doing the remodel myself, it took two years, working part time. During that period I managed to lose the instructions for this air switch. Thank you for providing them. Now I can install it on the front of my Ikea kitchen sink cabinet. When/if I ever am in a wheelchair or walker, I will still be able to easily reach the disposal switch. WARNING: If you have a toddler, mount this where they can't easily reach it and send a matchbox car down your sink disposal in an imaginary carwash.
Many localities in the United States prohibited the use of disposers.[8] For many years, garbage disposers were illegal in New York City because of a perceived threat of damage to the city's sewer system. After a 21-month study with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection,[9] the ban was rescinded in 1997 by local law 1997/071, which amended section 24-518.1, NYC Administrative Code.[10]
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