To fix this problem, turn off the disposal, fill the sink halfway full with soapy water, and use a cup plunger to plunge the kitchen sink for 30 seconds to one minute. If you cleared the clog, the water in the sink should start draining at a normal pace again. If you’re still have issues, you might have to remove the P-trap under the sink to get at the clog with a snake.
Watch the video below for tips on fixing your garbage disposal unit, including instructions for how to take it apart. If your unit still won't work, then you probably have a burned out motor or an electrical problem, which requires the expertise of a professional. This is when you'll want to call a plumber to replace your garbage disposal unit. It's a fairly difficult DIY project to replace your garbage disposal unit, but if you're up to it, here is a DIY guide for garbage disposal replacement.
Replacing a failed garbage disposer can seem daunting. There's the usual trepidation about electricity and water, the unfamiliar sink connection and enough drain fittings to make leaks a real possibility. Then there are the hassles of comparison shopping and the suspicion that the job could run into real money. And finally, failed disposers don't often leak, at least not in the beginning, so it's easy to put things off.
Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.
Assuming that you have already given the disposal the time it needs to run and clear the garbage, you probably have a congested drain line. We don’t recommend using chemical drain cleaners with a garbage disposal. You will very likely just damage the unit and end up with a sink full of toxic chemicals that you’ll eventually be forced to clean out manually. If the blockage doesn’t go down with the good ol’ baking soda and vinegar remedy, then calling a John Moore professional is your best bet. He or she will know exactly how to properly remove the bolts, disconnect the drain trap and remove the trap and the discharge drain pipe, check for clogs and any other obstructions, and finally clear the blockage with the latest and best tools. (See our previous post about good steps you can take when your kitchen sink is clogged!)

But there is really only one rule you need to follow: Never put your hand or fingers down into the disposal, even if you think the disposal has been unplugged or its circuit has been shut off. If a disposal gets turned on accidentally while your fingers are in the opening, the likelihood is that you will end up with bruised fingers, not bloody amputation. But this is not a risk that is necessary in any way.
Thanks so much! Clear, easy to follow instructions. We were able to follow step by step and got it done. I read somewhere that they used a car jack to hold the disposal when taking it off and putting it on. That was a really helpful tip for anyone else doing this. They’re fairly heavy. Also, it leaked when the gasket was just placed in the hole. We actually had to take it apart and put the gasket over the plastic pipe, then when you tighten the metal plate to connect it to the disposal, that sealed it. Anyway, thanks again. Being able to do this on our own saved us quite a bit of time and hassle.

Place a 1/2 inch rope of plumber's putty around the drain opening in the sink. Drop the new sink flange into the drain opening and press it into place. Placing a weight, such as a disposal, on top of the sink flange will help hold the sink flange in place while mounting the sink flange to the sink. To avoid scratching your sink or the flange, place a towel between the sink surface and the weight. (See Fig 4)
If your garbage disposal is making a clicking or rattling sound, there may be some food particles that will not grind up inside. Remove power from disposer, reach into the sink hole with a pair of tongs and remove anything that is still down in the disposer. Test your disposer to be sure the noise is gone. If not continue troubleshooting your disposer issue (see below).
I thought that this might be underpowered (my last one almost had double the power, after all), but it has plenty of power to eat through whatever you throw at it. I don't dump EVERYTHING down the drain, but it takes what I give it with no problems. And the last garbage disposal was loud and raucous--yes, raucous. But this one is a pleasure. When you flip the switch, it makes a reassuring hum. It sounds more like a fine piece of machinery than a couple of animals fighting to the death inside my sink (like my old disposer).
The mounting bracket for your new garbage disposer assembles by inserting the fiber gasket, back-up flange and mounting ring over the sink flange, in that order. Be sure to hold these three pieces in place while you insert the snap ring over the flange. It’s called a snap ring because you’ll hear it snap in place. Then firmly tighten the three mounting screws against the backup flange, being careful to tighten them evenly.
Avoid getting grease in your drain. It is not a good idea to pour any kind of oil, grease or fat into your garbage disposal. The grease can accumulate in the disposal unit, slowing down the motor and lining the pipes, causing the drain to clog. Try to wipe off as much grease as possible from pans and roasting tins using paper towel, before rinsing.
GE, which is an acronym for General Electric, is an international conglomerate whose headquarters are based in New York City, New York. The company operates in many different segments, ranging from home appliances to transportation. In terms of gross revenue, GE is the sixth largest company firm in the United States. GE garbage disposals have won praise for their powerful motors and overall durability.
If there is nothing visible clogging your disposal unit, the flip switch on your garbage disposal unit may have turned the unit off. This little red switch is located underneath your unit and protects against overheating and arcing situations. You can try pushing the red switch to reset the garbage disposal unit. Test your unit by turning it on. If it still won't turn on or makes a humming noise, unplug the unit or turn it off at the breaker box, and move to step 4.
Garbage disposals first appeared in households in the 1930's and 1940's. These appliances, which are installed under a kitchen sink, can make a cook's life easier by trapping and shredding food waste items, allowing it to pass through the plumbing system. Although these popular appliances make cooking and cleaning much more convenient, they do require regular maintenance to keep them running at optimal performance. When it is time to replace your garbage disposal's blades, you can save time and money by doing it yourself.
This is the best replacement garbage disposal stopper thingie I've ever purchased. It is also the only garbage disposal stopper thingie that I've ever purchased. But it does the job, it fits the sink perfectly, and it reduces my fear that when the garbage disposal is turned on that it may launch a penny or other metal missile that had accidentally dropped into the sink at supersonic speed toward my head.

A broken garbage disposal makes tackling your to-dos an unnecessary challenge, which is why the experts at Sansone want to help. Whether your garbage disposal is leaking, clogged, humming, or completely stuck, we can repair the issue or replace your garbage disposal entirely. Contact us today with any plumbing questions or schedule an appointment that’s convenient for you by phone or on our website.


If your garbage disposal is making a clicking or rattling sound, there may be some food particles that will not grind up inside. Remove power from disposer, reach into the sink hole with a pair of tongs and remove anything that is still down in the disposer. Test your disposer to be sure the noise is gone. If not continue troubleshooting your disposer issue (see below). 

Garbage Disposal Replacement

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