In the United States, almost all garbage disposals on the market are manufactured by a handful of companies; although, many are branded under different names. For example, out of the top ten highest rated models on the market, InSinkErator makes eight of them. Whirlpool and WasteKing are the other two most well-known brands in the U.S. There are a wide range of models to choose from, ranging from basic $50.00 models to models equipped with all of the latest bells and whistles that can cost as much as $600.00. In most cases, you get what you pay for in terms of quality. Here is a brief overview of the top brands in the U.S.
STEP 7 – You may have stubborn object stuck in the blades that is preventing the motor from rotating. This means it is time to apply a little muscle. Get your handy allen wrench out and insert the tip of the short end into the hexagon shaped hole at the bottom center of the disposal. If it doesn’t fit, find or buy one that does. They usually come in multi-pack sets with various sizes to choose form. Your disposal might have had one packaged with it. if so, find it and use that one. Once inserted, rotate it a half-turn clockwise and then a half-turn counter clockwise to see if the mechanism inside the disposal will move at all. If so, it will help to move the blades back and forth a few times to force through the obstruction. After you’re done, restore power to the disposal and turn it on. At this point, your efforts may have helped your disposal to work again. If not, try one more time.
Modern food waste disposers are often connected to your dishwasher’s drain pipe. This connection enables your dishwasher to rid itself of any leftover food scraps or residue that it might accumulate while washing your dishes. Where the dishwasher hose and the garbage disposal connect is a common source for leaks. The leaks most often occur when hose’s clamp is not secure enough. Leaks also develop when the dishwasher hose cracks. In order to fix this type of leak, you should either replace the cracked section of hose or tighten the clamp down.
In most cases if your garbage disposal is humming it is because a foreign object is stuck in the disposal. If an item has been jammed in the blades of the disposal they will be unable to rotate. This can result in a humming noise. If this is the case simply unplug the disposal under the sink then survey the drain hole. If you discover that an object is stuck in the blades remove it. Once you have done this you can plug the disposal back in and flip the switch. This should clear up the problem.
Turn off power to the disposal before attempting to clear the jam. Use the wrench to turn the blades in both directions to loosen the obstruction. Try to run the disposal again. If you don’t hear the motor at all, it’s possible that your disposal’s overload protector has been tripped. If your disposal has this feature, it can be reset by pushing a button somewhere on the outside of the unit.

STEP 7 – You may have stubborn object stuck in the blades that is preventing the motor from rotating. This means it is time to apply a little muscle. Get your handy allen wrench out and insert the tip of the short end into the hexagon shaped hole at the bottom center of the disposal. If it doesn’t fit, find or buy one that does. They usually come in multi-pack sets with various sizes to choose form. Your disposal might have had one packaged with it. if so, find it and use that one. Once inserted, rotate it a half-turn clockwise and then a half-turn counter clockwise to see if the mechanism inside the disposal will move at all. If so, it will help to move the blades back and forth a few times to force through the obstruction. After you’re done, restore power to the disposal and turn it on. At this point, your efforts may have helped your disposal to work again. If not, try one more time.
Disposers range between $45 and $250, and most hold up fairly well under normal use. It's common for a $50, 1/3-hp disposer with a 1-year warranty to last 10 to 12 years. So what does more money buy? Increased longevity, longer warranties, more power and less aggravation. The better units have stainless steel components, auto-reversing starts and bigger motors. Units that reverse direction with each start greatly reduce stoppages, while larger motors can chew through larger and more varied food loads.

A continuous feed model features a switch that is generally mounted on the wall nearby. In rarer cases, an air pressure switch may be mounted on the countertop. These air pressure switches are considered safer than traditional flip switches because they guard against shock by isolating the electrical system away from the sink’s source of water. Batch feed garbage disposals do not require the installation or use of a switch. Safety codes in your community will dictate how far away from the sink the electrical switch must be located.
Another method for cleaning and deodorizing your disposal unit is to sprinkle some baking soda in your unit and rinse it with about a cup of vinegar. This will create the bubbling “volcano effect” that kids love to watch so invite them in on this cleaning project. After allowing your mixture to sit for about 5 minutes, run hot water down the disposal until everything is thoroughly rinsed.
Many localities in the United States prohibited the use of disposers.[8] For many years, garbage disposers were illegal in New York City because of a perceived threat of damage to the city's sewer system. After a 21-month study with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection,[9] the ban was rescinded in 1997 by local law 1997/071, which amended section 24-518.1, NYC Administrative Code.[10]
STEP 4 – If you must use your hands (again, not advised) to pull out all that funky goo, see STEP 2. The disposal must be powered off and unplugged. No exceptions. Not even on a double-dog dare. Also, make sure your hand will actually fit into the opening so that you can eventually remove your hand from the opening. You may need your hand later. If you think it is going to be a tight fit, I’d suggest that you not try it all. You’ve been warned.
Your garbage disposer is not draining, has water leaks, creates weird noises, or has horrible odors? Troubleshoot your Faulty Disposer. If you are experiencing garbage disposal problems, you will find solutions on our checklist below to help you repair it. Before going out and spending a few hundred dollars on a new one, troubleshoot your existing sink garbage disposer to find the problem.
Hot water, a good degreasing soap and a terrycloth rag. Try 409 degreaser and let it sit a few minutes, then run hot water on the cloth, add soap and rub the flange on top and underneath. There are commercial brushes available, but brushes don't always de-grease well. They are, however, very useful for cleaning crevices. Regular cleaning makes this job much easier.
If the leak occurred under the sink and at the top of the disposal before you unplugged the sink drain, your leak is in the sink flange. This indicates that an improper seal exists between the unit and the sink, which can occur from corrosion or the disposal being bumped hard and out of place. This fix requires you to move the disposal altogether. Then apply a generous amount of plumber’s putty to the flange. Finally, replace the disposal and retighten the flange.
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As advertised, it does come with a corded plug so it will need an outlet. My old Badger was a direct wire. Some folks tore out the cord and the strain relief as a fix and hard wired it like their old one. Some folks put an outlet in, which I found that to be a 15 minute job. I didn't want to mess around with chopping out the stock cord and putting in a new one and messing with the strain relief replacement. I thought the new outlet process was much easier because, heck, the wire's already there and that's always the hardest part of wiring a box! I shoved some of the extra length of the existing wire back into the hole in the wall that it came out from. I thought carefully about where the new box should go so the body of the disposal didn't hit it. I screwed it to the back of the cabinet, poked the wires into the box, screwed them to a new receptacle and, voila!. NOTE: IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING WITH ELECTRICAL WIRING, DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS YOURSELF. If you do, be sure to kill the power at the circuit breaker and it is probably the easiest box you will install. Just make sure it is securely mounted into something besides the flimsy back panel of the cabinet.
Most modern kitchen sink drains are this dimension--both on the garbage disposal side and the "rinse" side. These are well made items that work very effectively. Unlike most kitchen sink stoppers that rest on top of the drain opening and extend upwards into the sink when you're doing dishes, these fit down into the large opening and seal the smaller opening above the garbage disposal or "rinse" sink drain strainer. In other words they seal the drain without extending upwards into the sink full of water.

Turn off power to the disposal before attempting to clear the jam. Use the wrench to turn the blades in both directions to loosen the obstruction. Try to run the disposal again. If you don’t hear the motor at all, it’s possible that your disposal’s overload protector has been tripped. If your disposal has this feature, it can be reset by pushing a button somewhere on the outside of the unit.
A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 800 RPM motor-powered dual stainless-steel swivel impellers within this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal to make the grinding and draining of undesirable food waste a snap. A manual reset overload protector helps safeguard the disposer from damage ensuring operational longevity. With ...  More + Product Details Close
Disposals can leak at a couple different places. Start by turning off the disposal at its base. Then, find the disposal mount and remove the unit by turning it counterclockwise from the bottom. Once the disposal has been removed from the mount, you should be able to see the three mounting bolts. Tighten these bolts to make sure they’re not leaking.
One of the screws on the side of my Badger 5 is rusty and seems to be the source of a very minor leak. If I leave a towel in place under the side of the unit, it will saturate after a week or two. Drain, dishwasher, and sink connections are bone dry. As well as the flange connect at sink. Can I let it be or is this a major disaster waiting to happen?
Jump up ^ Specter, Michael (22 June 1992). "Only in New York: Garbage Disposers, Banned, Stir Debate". New York Times. Most major cities banned garbage disposers after World War II, driven by worries that ground food would clog sewer pipes beneath their booming neighborhoods. ... But a series of studies from universities and the not completely disinterested plumbing industry showed that the additional waste from ground food scraps would rarely harm a city sewage system.
A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.
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