Assuming that you have already given the disposal the time it needs to run and clear the garbage, you probably have a congested drain line. We don’t recommend using chemical drain cleaners with a garbage disposal. You will very likely just damage the unit and end up with a sink full of toxic chemicals that you’ll eventually be forced to clean out manually. If the blockage doesn’t go down with the good ol’ baking soda and vinegar remedy, then calling a John Moore professional is your best bet. He or she will know exactly how to properly remove the bolts, disconnect the drain trap and remove the trap and the discharge drain pipe, check for clogs and any other obstructions, and finally clear the blockage with the latest and best tools. (See our previous post about good steps you can take when your kitchen sink is clogged!)

If your garbage disposal just won’t turn at all, then it’s very likely that the disposal has lost power. Your unit may have blown a circuit, or it could be unplugged. First, check the plug for your garbage disposal to ensure that it’s secure. Next, locate the reset button on the underside of the unit, and push it. If neither of these things fixes the problem, look inside your electrical panel for signs of a tripped circuit.
The majority of today’s garbage disposals are designed to dovetail with a sink’s drain outlet, which makes connecting the two components simple. There are a multitude of connection kits and adaptors available. Many models feature a power cord that is simply plugged into a nearby outlet to power the unit; however, when an outlet is not available, the unit must be hardwired, which can be significantly more expensive.
Jump up ^ "Sub-committee onpo East-West Economic Co-operation and Convergence and Sub-committee on Civilian Security and Co-operation Trip Report: Visit to Rome / Palermo Secretariat Report 6–8 May 1998 (Prefect Gennaro Monaco, Deputy-Chief of Police and Chief of the Section of Criminal Police)". NATO Parliamentary Assembly. August 18, 1998. Retrieved 2009-01-24.
We have an annoying habit of letting the sink fill with dishes (I know *I* surely don't contribute to such, so it must be everyone else). Occasionally, the disposal backs up if you don't run it, so the sink begins to fill with water. When that happens, you can't see if there is any flatware in the bottom of the sink to get sucked down and chewed up. By sitting down in the drain, the Disposal Genie keeps that from happening, while letting you still run most of your scraps into the disposal.

In the event that you do not have a grounded outlet to power the garbage disposal, you will need to install one. Adding a grounded outlet may cost as little as $5 when existing electrical wiring is placed a short distance away, plus an additional $75 for the electrician's labor. If a new grounded outlet needs to be added and electrical wiring does not yet exist, it will likely cost around $90, depending on labor and parts. If your project requires the addition of a new switch and wire, plan to spend an average of $5 to $10 on materials, plus about 30 minutes of labor at an average cost of $75 an hour.

This is a heavy-duty stopper that does the job well for my light use in the kitchen. The only remark I'll make is that I always lift out garbage disposal stoppers and strainers after each use and keep them inverted with the concave side down over the drain so they dry out completely. The stopper isn't doing anything for you in between uses, so there's no sense in keeping it seated tightly in the drain. Keep it inverted and dried out to prevent disgusting scum from accumulating rapidly.
InSinkErator is a brand name that is well-known for their design and manufacturing of waste disposal systems and instant hot water dispensers. John Hammes founded the company in 1927 in Racine, Wisconsin, where their headquarters remain today. Hammes is credited with designing and producing the first “in sink” waste disposal system, and the InSinkErator is a play on the word “incinerator”. Currently, InSinkErator produces and markets garbage disposal systems under the Evolution and Badger Series brand names.
Garbage disposals might be one of the most underrated conveniences in modern kitchens — and it’s usually not until something goes wrong that we realize how truly valuable the appliance is. When it comes to garbage disposals, one of the most common problems homeowners report is a leak. But while a leaky garbage disposal is an annoyance, the issue is typically easy to fix. This no-frills guide will help you find the source of a leak and detail how you can remedy the issue with a little knowledge and DIY magic.
The best part about this common issue is that in most instances anyone can fix the problem regardless of their skill-set. Additionally, you won't necessarily have to purchase any tools in order to get your disposal back in working mode. Most disposals come with an Allen wrench attached to them which should be the only tool you may need to fix a humming garbage disposal.
I am a researcher. I read every review - the good and the bad. I've read the Consumer Reports reviews, read the Amazon reviews, read the other, sketchier review websites like GreatGarbageDisposals.com (I made that one up but if you've done any research on the internet you get my point). I am writing this review to share what I learned about the product and about the many reviews I've read. My situation was that our 6 year old Badger froze up and simply quit on me, so a new one was in order.
After you install the new sink flange, you don’t want it shifting around when you’re assembling the parts underneath. Movement of the flange could break the seal between the flange and the sink, inviting a leak. Your best bet is to ask a helper to press down on the sink flange, or if you’re working alone, find something to weigh it down, such as the old disposal. Place an old towel under the weight so you don’t scratch the sink. If the bottom of your sink is quite concave, the old disposal might not contact the flange. In that case, place a can on the flange, then weigh down the can.
There are two main types of garbage disposers—continuous feed and batch feed. Continuous feed models are used by feeding in waste after being started and are more common. Batch feed units are used by placing waste inside the unit before being started. These types of units are started by placing a specially designed cover over the opening. Some covers manipulate a mechanical switch while others allow magnets in the cover to align with magnets in the unit. Small slits in the cover allow water to flow through. Batch feed models are considered safer, since the top of the disposal is covered during operation, preventing foreign objects from falling in.

Many localities in the United States prohibited the use of disposers.[8] For many years, garbage disposers were illegal in New York City because of a perceived threat of damage to the city's sewer system. After a 21-month study with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection,[9] the ban was rescinded in 1997 by local law 1997/071, which amended section 24-518.1, NYC Administrative Code.[10]
Attach the pipes. You will attach a 90-degree disposal drainpipe to the disposal and the tailpiece to the other sink drain. There should be p-traps on both the disposal and the tailpiece from the other sink and they should be level to one another. Use straight pipes and a T-fitting to connect both drains into one line and route the drainpipes into the main drain.

Some jams you can free and get the motor to spin and sound like it is working, but the blades are stuck in one position and can’t spin freely to do their job properly. This is very common problem – the motor works so we think everything is working. Not the case! This can lead to stoppages, food trapped in the disposal and a bad smell. These blades can’t be repaired. The disposal needs to be replaced.


How many years do garbage disposals last? One the average, quite a long time. In fact, with adequate care and proper maintenance, garbage disposal units can be of good service for about 8 to 15 years. This means the blades remain efficient and the motor has not burned out yet. This being said, neglecting garbage disposal leaks will significantly decrease this effective service life.

A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 800 RPM motor-powered dual stainless-steel swivel impellers within this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal to make the grinding and draining of undesirable food waste a snap. A manual reset overload protector helps safeguard the disposer from damage ensuring operational longevity. With ...  More + Product Details Close
If the unit is hardwired to the house then you have to use a screwdriver to remove the plate covering the wire connections on the disposal. Disconnect the exposed wires and then remove the plate covering the junction box on the wall. Untwist the wire caps securing the disposal wires to your home wires and set the disposal’s wires on the side. Twist the wire capes over the exposed wires in the junction box, put the wires into the junction box and reattach the junction box plate.

Sporting a powerful 2 800 RPM motor this Sporting a powerful 2 800 RPM motor this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal makes the grinding and draining of undesirable food waste a snap making use of jam-resistant dual stainless-steel swivel impellers to help get the job done while helping to prevent disposer clogs. EZ mount installation ensures quick ...  More + Product Details Close
Another common cause for a leaking garbage disposal is the disposal flange. A leak at the very most upper area of the garbage disposal could be the garbage disposal flange which goes through the sink. A garbage disposal flange should be sealed with Plumber’s putty and then tightened from underneath the sink. If this is not tight enough or if it has managed to come loose (which can happen) then the garbage disposal will have to be taken down so the flange can be resealed and then the garbage disposal can be rehung.

Garbage Disposal

×