We hate to say it, but stoppages in garbage disposals are generally due to “operator error”. Either we have put too much in at one time or tried to force something through, smashing it with a spoon (there is that pesky spoon again!). Pasta, rice and salad are killers of garbage disposal drains and really need to be put down the drain in small amounts; if you put half a pot of rice in at the same time you definitely stand the change up plugging up the pipes under your sink.
You can reschedule or cancel your service at any time. To reschedule, simply go to Your Orders, find your service order and click on the ‘Contact Provider’ button on Your Orders page. To cancel, click on the 'Cancel Order' button on Your Orders page. Payment goes to the pro from your secure Amazon account. Because you aren't charged until the actual work is completed, cancelling a job doesn't require a refund.
Lowe's offers garbage disposals like the InSinkErator Evolution and Badger garbage disposals in various horsepower options. Models with lower horsepower tend to become jammed easily. What if your garbage disposal jams? No problem. Simply locate the hex socket in the center of the underside of the disposal. Grab a hex wrench, put it in the socket, and work it back and forth until you feel the blades loosen up. Once the blades are spinning freely, press the garbage disposal reset button. It's that easy.
Last, but not least, as your garbage disposal system begins to age, it grows susceptible to cracking along its interior lining. When this shell develops cracks, water will begin to appear at its seams. At times, the leak can be observed from the bottom of the unit, particularly from the reset button. If this is the cause of your garbage disposal’s leaks, then there is no method of repairing other than replacing the whole unit.

Even the most trustworthy garbage disposal will develop a leak from time to time; however, just because your food waste disposer has developed a leak does not necessarily mean that it needs to be replaced. Doing a little bit of investigating and troubleshooting before deciding to run out and buy a new garbage disposal can mean the difference between spending $10.00 for a replacement and $100.00+ to replace the entire unit.

Update: As an aside, I also learned from my research that the best way to clean my disposal is to use citric acid. Having previously had no idea what citric acid was used for, I decided to order some from Amazon, going with the brand my sister uses: Citric Acid Powder - Ultra Fine Pure Powdered Crystals - Natural Preservative Food Grade Quality (16 oz) and gave it a whirl after 3 months of using my disposal. I let the citric acid sit with some water in the disposal for about ten minutes, and then I let it run for a solid 2 minutes. I repeated the procedure a few times and after about 30 minutes—wow, all the leftover gunk and food was flushed out of the disposal, leaving it clean with a very mild citrus scent. I feel like I’m becoming a real DIY at home kind of guy.
There are two main types of garbage disposers—continuous feed and batch feed. Continuous feed models are used by feeding in waste after being started and are more common. Batch feed units are used by placing waste inside the unit before being started. These types of units are started by placing a specially designed cover over the opening. Some covers manipulate a mechanical switch while others allow magnets in the cover to align with magnets in the unit. Small slits in the cover allow water to flow through. Batch feed models are considered safer, since the top of the disposal is covered during operation, preventing foreign objects from falling in.
The metal sink flange that sits directly inside the sink drain is typically sealed around the top with plumber’s putty (a clay-like sealant) and then secured from under the sink with bolts. If the plumber’s putty deteriorates, or the bolts loosen, the flange can no longer form a watertight seal between the sink drain and the disposal—which could cause a leak at the top of the unit.
Save yourself a lot of hassle and go with the same brand & model. By doing so you'll avoid having to remount and mess with the drain & sink connections. Save the old power cord so you don't have to buy a new one. You'll need to do some very minimal wiring work to pull the wires from the terminals in the old disposal and attach them to the disposal. Make sure to attach the green grounding wire to avoid getting shocked when you switch on the disposal!

If the disposal’s still leaking, loosen the mounting bolts and push the sink flange up until it’s slightly higher than the surface of the sink. Apply fresh plumber’s putty to the threshold between the flange and the sink. When you’ve applied enough, re-attach the unit by putting the bolts back and tightening. Wipe away excess putty that squeezed out. Finish re-installing by replacing the disposal unit on the mount. Turn the disposal back on and look for leaks.
If the disposal is hit hard enough, it can actually move and shift so that it no longer sits right. The pipes can be moved; the seals can be pressed in an awkward position; or the retaining bolts can loosen. Make sure nothing has been knocked out of place. Then, check to see where the water is coming from and tighten up the bolts. If this does not fix the leak, then you will need to replace the putty or the sealing ring.
Last, but not least, as your garbage disposal system begins to age, it grows susceptible to cracking along its interior lining. When this shell develops cracks, water will begin to appear at its seams. At times, the leak can be observed from the bottom of the unit, particularly from the reset button. If this is the cause of your garbage disposal’s leaks, then there is no method of repairing other than replacing the whole unit.
Keep anything too hard out of the disposal. The shredder will dull and become less efficient. Small hard objects can also get stuck and jam the rotating parts. Each garbage disposal has its own capacity for hard objects. The more expensive models of the same brand tend to have higher hardness capacities. The instruction manual usually specifies a list of objects to avoid. You can also gain experience with your own garbage disposal. Strong vegetable fibres can jam some garbage disposals, as well. If something may be harder than what the disposal handles, just put it in your trash can or think about setting up a worm composting bin. Some items to avoid are:
Ensure the breaker that controls the garbage disposal is off. Inspect the inlet hose from the dishwasher. If the leak is coming from a crack in the fixture itself, the unit needs to be replaced. If the hose has cracked or frayed, unscrew the clamp and remove it from the disposal unit. Cut off the end of the hose with a utility knife up to the point where the leak began. Dishwasher hoses provide plenty of slack, so cutting off a few inches should not be a problem. Slide the hose back onto the fixture, and reinstall the clamp.
Plug the disposal and fill up the sink with hot water and detergent. Unplug and run the disposal. The spinning disk forces the water down the drain like a pump. This should clear the disposal and the drain line. If not, you'll need to inspect the plumbing. Old pipes made of iron clog easily due to internal corrosion and should be replaced with copper.
Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.

Garbage Disposal Installation

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