Replacing a failed garbage disposer can seem daunting. There's the usual trepidation about electricity and water, the unfamiliar sink connection and enough drain fittings to make leaks a real possibility. Then there are the hassles of comparison shopping and the suspicion that the job could run into real money. And finally, failed disposers don't often leak, at least not in the beginning, so it's easy to put things off.

Using a garbage disposal is the swift and environmentally easy alternative to removing food waste from your kitchen. A garbage disposal is made to efficiently eliminate leftover food waste by grinding remains into fine particles that are easily flushed away. When shopping, look for a few key features before purchasing a garbage disposal, such as what type you will need? How much horsepower do you want? Are there any special features that you require? We also recommend to check if your waste goes to a septic tank, as this can determine the specific type you will need.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
Regarding the comments that the EZ Mount is flimsy or cheap or plastic, I have to respectfully disagree. The purpose of the lock ring is to compress the rubber gasket tight enough to make a seal so the thing doesn't leak. It doesn't need to be made from titanium or cast iron. Just because it isn't made from a rare earth metal doesn't make it inferior! It keeps the price down and works (so far) flawlessly. I did not need to tap the ears with a small hammer to get it to slide to the fully locked position - I was able to twist it into place with my bare non-Superman hands. I did not need to put dish soap on the ear slots but the directions suggest doing that if it is difficult to put into locked position.
I've always had Insinkerator garbage disposals so I just didn't know any better but now I do. Simply put, this is truly the king of garbage disposals. The amount of power it has is ridiculous and it will tear through just about any food I've thrown at it. Now, I have been hesitant to test it with some tougher items (I've heard stories of people feeding it chicken and rib bones) because I was always taught to be careful what you put down the disposal (a cheap wimpy unit in a relative's shore house seizes up with unpopped corn kernels and their home unit clogged with shredded zucchini). I have given it some things like apple cores though with absolutely no problem. I never would have put an apple core down my old Insinkerator. This king eats the core in about 3-5 seconds, if that. Completely gone. The thing that absolutely astounds me about this unit though is how QUIET it is. It's almost ridiculous. My old one, and most everyone else's I've ever heard sounds like an electric chain saw. This one sounds like someone is humming. When people come over I run it form them just to show off how quiet it is. I know. I'm weird. Add to that a lifetime warranty and this thing just cannot be beat for the money. Google it yourself and you will see how many people agree that this is the best value disposal available. The cheap Insinkerators will normally run you about $80. It's not that much more to get one of these and the benefits for the small price increase are totally worth it. For 50% more you get way more than a 50% better disposal. Of course you could spend $350 on the Insinkerator Elite but is that one going to be 300% better. I doubt it. If you found this review helpful please click yes below.
Disposers range between $45 and $250, and most hold up fairly well under normal use. It's common for a $50, 1/3-hp disposer with a 1-year warranty to last 10 to 12 years. So what does more money buy? Increased longevity, longer warranties, more power and less aggravation. The better units have stainless steel components, auto-reversing starts and bigger motors. Units that reverse direction with each start greatly reduce stoppages, while larger motors can chew through larger and more varied food loads.
Use a wet-dry vacuum cleaner to remove any smaller shards of glass. Simply hold the opening of the hose over the top of the garbage disposal and allow the vacuum to run until you can't hear anything be sucked up anymore. If the sink isn't particularly wet, you can use a regular vacuum, covering the end of the extension tube with a nylon stocking secured with a rubber band.
Run cold water while the disposal is on. Keep disposer and water running for 30 to 60 seconds AFTER the waste matter has cleared your drain. The waste still has a distance to go. Cold water keeps the motor, bearings and shredder assembly from overheating. It also lets the waste go down easier because the water is pushing it down. Don't use hot water, because it can melt fat and allow it to re-solidify as a blockage further down in the drain.
Today, we are living in the modern world of light-speed schedules and convenience. Garbage disposals have become a time-saving, convenience. Though garbage disposals make disposing of foods a simple task, they often go overlooked or under appreciated. Nevertheless, when something goes wrong, we cannot fail to notice the foul smell coming from our garbage disposal units.
To be prepared, measure the distance from the outlet to the top of each disposal before you remove the old unit. If the new unit’s outlet is lower, you must also lower the tee that the discharge pipe connects to. Loosen the two nuts that connect the tee to the tailpiece above and the trap below. Try lowering the tee to see if the tailpiece is long enough. If it’s not, you’ll have to replace it with one that’s slightly longer.
Located in Benton Harbor, Michigan, the American based Whirlpool Corporation is an international manufacturer and marketer of home appliances. Whirlpool markets many different brands, including KitchenAid, Maytag, Jenn-Air, and Amana. Their line of in sink disposers offer an affordable entry level option for homeowners who want to install a garbage disposal in their home.

Plug the disposal and fill up the sink with hot water and detergent. Unplug and run the disposal. The spinning disk forces the water down the drain like a pump. This should clear the disposal and the drain line. If not, you'll need to inspect the plumbing. Old pipes made of iron clog easily due to internal corrosion and should be replaced with copper.


Lift the sink flange from the top of the sink. Use a plastic putty knife to scrape off the old plumber’s putty around the top of the flange, then wipe off any putty residue with a damp rag. Grab a palmful of plumber’s putty from the container and roll it into an eighth-inch to quarter-inch-wide “rope” with a length roughly equal to the circumference of the flange. Wrap the rope of putty around the top of the flange like a collar, then insert the flange into the sink drain opening until snug. Re-install the mounting assembly and mounting ring (taking care to securely tighten the mounting bolts on the mounting assembly), then re-attach the garbage disposal, drain pipe, and dishwasher hose in the reverse order you detached them.
Thank you for sharing this tutorial. My husband and I tried to fix our garbage disposal last week but we couldn’t get it to work. When we turn it on, it makes a humming noise, but nothing is blocking the blades. We might need to get a new disposal, but we’ll probably have a professional look at it before we decide. We’ll keep your tips on hand, just in case.

One of the handiest appliances in your kitchen is probably something that you don’t think about very often, until it stops working. It’s your garbage disposer, and today I’m going to show you how to replace a garbage disposer under your kitchen sink. This project requires some moderate do-it-yourself skills, and it also requires turning off the electricity to the disposer at the electrical panel. But it’s really not that difficult, so let’s get started.
STEP 1 – Many garbage disposals (a.k.a electric pigs) have a reset button located at the bottom of the unit that behaves likes a breaker switch or the reset button found on some electrical outlets. You may have to feel around for it if you can’t see it. While the disposal is off, press this button and then try to activate the disposal. If this works, skip the remaining steps and get back to doing your dishes! You solved the problem!

Badger food waste disposers are a reliable and Badger food waste disposers are a reliable and functional choice when affordability is the prime concern. Badger 5XP features a 3/4 horsepower heavy-duty quiet Dura-Drive induction motor rugged galvanized steel construction for disposer durability and a space-saving compact design. To top it off Badger 5XP offers a 3-year We Come ...  More + Product Details Close
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