Turn off the garbage disposal at the breaker box. Remove the drain pipe if it is leaking there. Most attachment clamps are wire clamps with two protruding wires that are pushed together to release the drain pipe. Push the wires together and remove the clamp. Pull the pipe off and inspect the seal for any debris that may have lodged between the seal and the pipe. Wipe the seal with a damp rag to remove any dirt, debris or food particles. Sometimes the wire clamp loses tension. In that case, tighten the hose clamp down in its place, which may secure the pipe leak-free.
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Most garbage disposals are sealed using plumber’s putty. You’ll need to detach the garbage disposal, clean off the old putty and reseal. Other types of disposals use only a flange that is tightened and compressed with screws. This may need to be replaced. Either way, this can be a big job if you don’t know what you’re doing (requires removing and replacing drain pipes, as well).
STEP 7 – You may have stubborn object stuck in the blades that is preventing the motor from rotating. This means it is time to apply a little muscle. Get your handy allen wrench out and insert the tip of the short end into the hexagon shaped hole at the bottom center of the disposal. If it doesn’t fit, find or buy one that does. They usually come in multi-pack sets with various sizes to choose form. Your disposal might have had one packaged with it. if so, find it and use that one. Once inserted, rotate it a half-turn clockwise and then a half-turn counter clockwise to see if the mechanism inside the disposal will move at all. If so, it will help to move the blades back and forth a few times to force through the obstruction. After you’re done, restore power to the disposal and turn it on. At this point, your efforts may have helped your disposal to work again. If not, try one more time.
To reseal the leaky flange, you must first detach the garbage disposal. Start by loosening the screws securing the main drain pipe to the disposal, then loosen the screws in the metal clamp securing the dishwasher hose to the disposal and detach the drain pipe and dishwasher hose from the disposal. Loosen the screws in the mounting ring that connects the disposal to the metal mounting assembly beneath the sink, then pull down the disposal and carefully set it on a clean, dry surface. Loosen the bolts in the mounting assembly with a wrench, then pull down the mounting assembly and set it near the disposal.
Discharge Pipe: The discharge pipe that goes into the drain of the sink is attached to the bottom of the garbage disposal. Either of these parts can sometimes loosen from regular use or may fail altogether with enough wear and tear.Check to be sure the connection is tight and tighten with a plumber’s wrench if necessary. If the discharge pipe still leaks, the seal that is located between the retaining nut and the discharge pipe may need to be replaced.
Garbage disposals are fairly straightforward machines. When something goes wrong with your garbage disposal, there are aren’t very many things you can do to troubleshoot your unit. This makes repairing your broken garbage disposal a relatively simple task. If your garbage disposal has broken, you can follow these tips to attempt to repair your unit.
If you misplaced your wrench that came with the unit, don’t worry. The store you got your unit from should have replacements for as little as $3 to $5. An Allen wrench will usually work well, too. Replacing the motor is the most costly repair for a disposal, so replacing the unit may be your best bet. If the disposal is jammed and won’t budge after using your wrench, turn it off and call us right away.
The metal sink flange that sits directly inside the sink drain is typically sealed around the top with plumber’s putty (a clay-like sealant) and then secured from under the sink with bolts. If the plumber’s putty deteriorates, or the bolts loosen, the flange can no longer form a watertight seal between the sink drain and the disposal—which could cause a leak at the top of the unit.
Discharge Pipe: The discharge pipe that goes into the drain of the sink is attached to the bottom of the garbage disposal. Either of these parts can sometimes loosen from regular use or may fail altogether with enough wear and tear.Check to be sure the connection is tight and tighten with a plumber’s wrench if necessary. If the discharge pipe still leaks, the seal that is located between the retaining nut and the discharge pipe may need to be replaced.
As one of the most important fixtures in your kitchen, your garbage disposal goes through extreme wear and tear on a day-to-day basis. To avoid accidental injury or further damage, don’t attempt to fix any unknown garbage disposal problems yourself. Instead, call the plumbers at Benjamin Franklin Plumbing to solve your problesm, whether you need  a repair, unclogging, or replacement.
I'm not what you'd call a handyman, although I've been working to get better at that. I will now at least try a home project before passing on it. So, when our 15-year garbage disposal died I had another opportunity. I determined our old unit to be a Badger 5 1/2 HP (this exact item). I didn't have time to wait for the item to arrive from Amazon so I went to Home Depot and coughed up an extra $20 for the Badger 500 - Home Depot's branded version of this item. They are identical except for the name & sticker.
Most blog writers make money from the links they include, so if someone is reading this and decides to click on a link and purchase the item, they receive a small sales commission per se. Mind you it takes hundreds to thousands of these blogs ranking high in google searches (I’m sure you have an issue with most people using googleopoly as well) in order to make any real money at it, but until other brands get on the bandwagon and pay instead of hoping for free advertising, great bloggers will continue to use what pays the bills. Or at least kicks you back a free tank of gas or two a year.

As it's a direct replacement, I didn't even bother to go through the hassle or removing the old sink flange and having to putty in a new one as the existing one was just fine. It took me about 5 minutes to replace old with new - that's why I didn't bother with a different make. I'm an average Joe who does a few things around the house - mostly accompanied by a lot of cussing - so anything that makes such work quick and simple results in less swearing - which is a good thing right?!
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A garbage disposal unit (also known as a garbage disposal, waste disposal unit, garbage disposer, or in Canadian English a garburator) is a device, usually electrically powered, installed under a kitchen sink between the sink's drain and the trap. The disposal unit shreds food waste into pieces small enough—generally less than 2 mm (0.079 in)—to pass through plumbing.[1]
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