For over 75 years InSinkErator has been known for building the world's best food waste disposers. Badger, our standard disposer line, is basic, reliable, and functional. Available in various models and sizes for a range of applications, InSinkErator also manufactures a premier line of disposers, the Evolution Series. InSinkErator food waste disposers are the only disposers that are proudly made in the U.S.A. InSinkErator has grown into the largest food waste disposer manufacturer and best-selling garbage disposer brand in the world.
When rubber gaskets age, they can develop leaks. The gasket can dry up, crack, and leak when it is repeatedly exposed to long periods of disuse where no water is present in the drain pipe. Should an older garbage disposal be removed and then placed back, it will require a new rubber gasket to again achieve a watertight seal. Moreover, if a gasket is not evenly locked on all three sides, then it will develop a leak.
If not, unplug the disposal from its electrical outlet and test the outlet with another appliance, such as a hair dryer. If it is hardwired to an electrical box or it doesn’t work, go to the circuit breaker panel and reset the circuit breaker that serves the disposal (often the same circuit used by the dishwasher) by turning it all of the way off and then back on.
The only existing hole I can think of ‘near the top’ that is a part of the unit, would be the place where a dishwasher hose would attach. Was that disposal once connected to a dishwasher that is no longer there? If so, that could be why water is coming out of ‘an existing hole’… Seems silly maybe, but sometimes the most obvious really is the answer.

When rubber gaskets age, they can develop leaks. The gasket can dry up, crack, and leak when it is repeatedly exposed to long periods of disuse where no water is present in the drain pipe. Should an older garbage disposal be removed and then placed back, it will require a new rubber gasket to again achieve a watertight seal. Moreover, if a gasket is not evenly locked on all three sides, then it will develop a leak.

A clogged garbage disposal unit can leak when you try to operate it without removing the clogging. What clogs up garbage disposals? Normally this would be expandable food like rice and pasta. Even large animal bones can also result in clogging and possible leak. Although coffee grounds help eliminate odors, allowing it to accumulate in the drain of the disposer will result in clogging and potential leak.
Make sure the reset button on the bottom is not popped out. If your disposal has a cord, make sure it is plugged in and there is power to the disposal. If your disposal has a cord, and there is no power to the disposal, check the breaker or GFI on the wall. If your disposer is hard wired into the wall, check the circuit breaker behind the electrical panel. If humming it is probably jammed. Use the small wrench that can with your disposal to unjam it and stop it from humming.
Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.
Modern food waste disposers are often connected to your dishwasher’s drain pipe. This connection enables your dishwasher to rid itself of any leftover food scraps or residue that it might accumulate while washing your dishes. Where the dishwasher hose and the garbage disposal connect is a common source for leaks. The leaks most often occur when hose’s clamp is not secure enough. Leaks also develop when the dishwasher hose cracks. In order to fix this type of leak, you should either replace the cracked section of hose or tighten the clamp down.

Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person.

Garbage Disposal Repair

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