This is our workhorse medium-capacity model with a This is our workhorse medium-capacity model with a powerful 2 HP motor that handles hundreds of servings at one meal. Like all InSinkErator foodservice disposers it delivers superior performance quiet operation maximum energy efficiency and long service life. Designed for continuous operation in locations such as schools hospitals larger restaurants ...  More + Product Details Close
When something blocks your disposal unit’s flywheel, you will start hearing a low humming sound, and you know you’ve got a jam. Un-jamming a garbage disposal is something that depends on the specific unit you own. Every single one has a function to shut off when they are stuck to the point of stalling the motor. This is so the motor doesn’t burn out. However, they are also designed so that anyone (and we mean anyone!) can remove whatever it is that is blocking your unit. Underneath every unit is a small slot, and pretty much all of them come with a tiny little wrench to match it. These are most commonly called hex-head wrenches. Yes, that little tool that you probably have no idea where it could possibly be has a very specific and important purpose. Mind blown, right?
Like most appliances with moving parts, all kinds of stuff can go wrong in your disposal, for all sorts of reasons. Luckily, unlike many appliances, most disposals can be quickly and relatively easily fixed, as long as you’re careful and do your research. The next time you experience one of the following problems, follow these instructions and see if you can’t get things moving again.
If the garbage disposal won’t turn on, then it’s probably not getting power. First, make sure it’s plugged in. It’s easy to forget that disposals have wall outlets. It’s easy to knock a plug out of an outlet accidentally, especially in a dark place like under the sink. If the disposal is plugged in, check the reset button on the bottom of the disposal unit. If the disposal requires resetting, the button will be popped out. Simply press it and try the disposal again.
Your electrical supply wires should include a black (or hot) wire, a white (or neutral) wire and either a green or a bare wire, which is the ground wire. First remove the electrical cover plate on the bottom of the new disposer. Then move the new disposer into the cabinet. Screw the threaded end of the cable connector into the round hole on the bottom of the disposer. You’ll run your electrical supply wires through the cable connector and up through the access hole.
If your garbage disposal just won’t turn at all, then it’s very likely that the disposal has lost power. Your unit may have blown a circuit, or it could be unplugged. First, check the plug for your garbage disposal to ensure that it’s secure. Next, locate the reset button on the underside of the unit, and push it. If neither of these things fixes the problem, look inside your electrical panel for signs of a tripped circuit.
Next, you’ll connect the wires that you disconnected from the old disposer, to the new disposer. If this isn’t a replacement project, and you’re adding a new disposer where you didn’t have one before, you’ll first need to call an electrician to run the proper wires and a wall switch to the unit. For our project, the electrical wires and switch were already in place.
Flip the disposer over and unscrew the electrical cover plate on the bottom of the disposer by removing the cover plate screw. Again, be sure the power to the unit has been turned off at the electrical supply panel. Then disconnect the electrical cable connector. Pull out the wires and remove the wire nuts. Also unscrew the ground wire from the green ground screw. Be sure to save the electrical cable connector so you can use it again.
No need to worry if your garbage disposal is on the fritz—installing a new one is a straightforward project that you can do yourself in just a few minutes. Start by switching off the power to the disposal at your home’s breaker box to ensure that you can work safely. Next, remove the old unit by detaching it from the mounting ring directly beneath the sink drain. Finally, install any necessary new mounting hardware, fit the new disposal into place, and turn on the water to test for leaks before giving it a trial run.
The horror movie image of victims having hands and arms severed in a garbage disposal is entirely a Hollywood invention. In reality, the blades inside a garbage disposal are rather dull grinders, not gleaming, razor-sharp sabers. That is not to say that a disposal should be taken lightly—it is indeed possible to be painfully injured if you don't practice basic safety measures. 
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First, is it loud or quiet? It really depends on which review you read, apparently. I believe it depends on more than that, such as what kind of sink is it being installed under - a stainless steel or a porcelain coated cast iron sink? One is very thin and flexible and will not block out as much noise or damp vibrations as effectively as a heavy cast iron sink. I have found the overall noise level to be a lot like the Badger 5 that I replaced. My wife thinks it sounds a bit different but neither louder nor quieter. It also depends on whether this is your first disposer (it is certainly louder than not having one) or a replacement. Bottom line, it's typically run for a few seconds, with the water running too, as you are cleaning up after meal (not in the middle of the night when everyone's trying to sleep) and it's no louder or quieter than the rest. I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor unless you have different criteria. If so, you can pay twice as much for that other "Elite" one by another manufacturer that is CR-rated as the quietest one. In my case I couldn't justify the added cost.
Reattach the electrical wires. Unscrew the faceplate on the underside of the new unit. Match the colored wires on the power supply to those in the disposal’s electric housing and connect them using plastic wire nuts. Slip the copper grounding wire over the green screw at the far edge of the compartment. Replace the cover and tighten the screws.[16]
Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.

Garbage Disposal Installation

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