As advertised, it does come with a corded plug so it will need an outlet. My old Badger was a direct wire. Some folks tore out the cord and the strain relief as a fix and hard wired it like their old one. Some folks put an outlet in, which I found that to be a 15 minute job. I didn't want to mess around with chopping out the stock cord and putting in a new one and messing with the strain relief replacement. I thought the new outlet process was much easier because, heck, the wire's already there and that's always the hardest part of wiring a box! I shoved some of the extra length of the existing wire back into the hole in the wall that it came out from. I thought carefully about where the new box should go so the body of the disposal didn't hit it. I screwed it to the back of the cabinet, poked the wires into the box, screwed them to a new receptacle and, voila!. NOTE: IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING WITH ELECTRICAL WIRING, DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS YOURSELF. If you do, be sure to kill the power at the circuit breaker and it is probably the easiest box you will install. Just make sure it is securely mounted into something besides the flimsy back panel of the cabinet.
I found a vertical crack, about 1 inch long, along the upper part of the disposal housing. The unit, an insinkerator badger 9, is from 2010. When water goes through the unit, a small amount will drip. The amount of water is actually quite limited, even when using lots of water to wash dishes. The unit is obviously old, but seems to work fine otherwise. What are your recommendations? Replace? or just catch the dripping water (1 table spoon per day).
• Run water before and after you use the disposal If something has been put in the disposal that should not have been, use tongs or pliers to pull the material out. Never use your hand. To clean a garbage disposal of built-up sludge and debris, fill it with ice cubes and a cup of rock salt and then run it for about five seconds. If your garbage disposal smells bad, you can deodorize it by running warm water down it while you grind a quartered lemon.
If the disposal is hit hard enough, it can actually move and shift so that it no longer sits right. The pipes can be moved; the seals can be pressed in an awkward position; or the retaining bolts can loosen. Make sure nothing has been knocked out of place. Then, check to see where the water is coming from and tighten up the bolts. If this does not fix the leak, then you will need to replace the putty or the sealing ring.

Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person.

Garbage Disposal Repair

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