If some bad odors are coming from your disposal, it can mean that it is not chopping up the food finely and there are drainage issues. Try putting lemons peels (not wedges, y’all) through it first and see if that removes the odor. If that doesn’t help or if the smell returns frequently, that may be telling you that that the disposal isn’t swallowing and chopping up your leftovers correctly.
Roll out a generous amount of Plumber’s putty to a uniform width making a nice snake-like gasket out of putty. Wrap the putty onto the rim of the flange. Push the flange back into position and put the bottom flange on with the clip holding it into place. Tighten the three screws evenly until all three are tight. Scrape off any extra putty from the inside of the sink. Now you are ready to lock the garbage disposer back in place, reconnect the drains and test for leaks.

A. First, troubleshoot a bit. You can stick something down the drain (not your fingers) to try and dislodge whatever may be causing the blockage. You can also try using a shop vac to unblock the drain. If these options don’t work, cut the electricity connection to your device before you go inside to try and remove anything that’s stuck. If you still can’t find the culprit, call a professional. Your unit may be damaged.
Disposals can leak at a couple different places. Start by turning off the disposal at its base. Then, find the disposal mount and remove the unit by turning it counterclockwise from the bottom. Once the disposal has been removed from the mount, you should be able to see the three mounting bolts. Tighten these bolts to make sure they’re not leaking.
The metal sink flange that sits directly inside the sink drain is typically sealed around the top with plumber’s putty (a clay-like sealant) and then secured from under the sink with bolts. If the plumber’s putty deteriorates, or the bolts loosen, the flange can no longer form a watertight seal between the sink drain and the disposal—which could cause a leak at the top of the unit.
This new one some how makes it quiet when using the disposal. I have no idea how old the other one was, it was here when we moved in. It was flimsy and would let dirty water come up. Cleaning the splash guard and the drain it went into didn't help at all. The new is firm and sits in the drain level. My daughter was putting the old one slanted some to keep it in there. After 2 1/2 years it was falling apart. I wish I'd bought one when we first moved in. This is the first garbage disposal for me but now I've learned what to expect from it. I recommend this product and will buy another if I'm still here when this one starts to get flimsy!
If you can hear your disposal’s motor humming, but the disposal won’t grind, sounds loud, or starts and stops, it’s probably because something jammed it. Disposals jam when something gets lodged in the “flywheel,” which is what the disposal’s rotating plate is called. You can fix it yourself, but remember: NEVER stick your hand down the garbage disposal. Ever. Seriously.
First, is it loud or quiet? It really depends on which review you read, apparently. I believe it depends on more than that, such as what kind of sink is it being installed under - a stainless steel or a porcelain coated cast iron sink? One is very thin and flexible and will not block out as much noise or damp vibrations as effectively as a heavy cast iron sink. I have found the overall noise level to be a lot like the Badger 5 that I replaced. My wife thinks it sounds a bit different but neither louder nor quieter. It also depends on whether this is your first disposer (it is certainly louder than not having one) or a replacement. Bottom line, it's typically run for a few seconds, with the water running too, as you are cleaning up after meal (not in the middle of the night when everyone's trying to sleep) and it's no louder or quieter than the rest. I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor unless you have different criteria. If so, you can pay twice as much for that other "Elite" one by another manufacturer that is CR-rated as the quietest one. In my case I couldn't justify the added cost.
If the disposal is hit hard enough, it can actually move and shift so that it no longer sits right. The pipes can be moved; the seals can be pressed in an awkward position; or the retaining bolts can loosen. Make sure nothing has been knocked out of place. Then, check to see where the water is coming from and tighten up the bolts. If this does not fix the leak, then you will need to replace the putty or the sealing ring.
Your electrical supply wires should include a black (or hot) wire, a white (or neutral) wire and either a green or a bare wire, which is the ground wire. First remove the electrical cover plate on the bottom of the new disposer. Then move the new disposer into the cabinet. Screw the threaded end of the cable connector into the round hole on the bottom of the disposer. You’ll run your electrical supply wires through the cable connector and up through the access hole.
If your garbage disposal is making a clicking or rattling sound, there may be some food particles that will not grind up inside. Remove power from disposer, reach into the sink hole with a pair of tongs and remove anything that is still down in the disposer. Test your disposer to be sure the noise is gone. If not continue troubleshooting your disposer issue (see below).

Garbage Disposal Replacement

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