Last, but not least, as your garbage disposal system begins to age, it grows susceptible to cracking along its interior lining. When this shell develops cracks, water will begin to appear at its seams. At times, the leak can be observed from the bottom of the unit, particularly from the reset button. If this is the cause of your garbage disposal’s leaks, then there is no method of repairing other than replacing the whole unit.
Quick Lock makes it fast & easy to switch out one InSinkErator garbage disposal for another. If you’re installing a disposal for the first time, all of the Quick Lock components you need come packed in the box. And then if it’s time to upgrade or replace your disposal, simply twist off the old one & twist on the new. The polished stainless steel InSinkErator sink flange will complement most stainless steel sinks and is compatible with most three-bolt mounting assemblies.

InSinkErator is a brand name that is well-known for their design and manufacturing of waste disposal systems and instant hot water dispensers. John Hammes founded the company in 1927 in Racine, Wisconsin, where their headquarters remain today. Hammes is credited with designing and producing the first “in sink” waste disposal system, and the InSinkErator is a play on the word “incinerator”. Currently, InSinkErator produces and markets garbage disposal systems under the Evolution and Badger Series brand names.
Waste King L-8000: 1 horsepower garbage disposal with pre-installed power cord and sound insulation. Energy efficient permanent magnet motor and stainless steel swivel impellers reduce jamming. Fast and easy to install with a removable splashguard that is easy to clean and replace. Rust and corrosion-proof glass-filled nylon grind chamber and drain housing with stainless steel grinding components. Continuous feed technology. Front-mounted reset button for easy use. Safe to use with properly-sized septic tanks.
The InSinkErator Badger 1 Continuous Feed Garbage Disposal 1/3 HP features a quick-mounting system that allows for easy installation or replacement. This sturdy garbage Disposal is constructed from galvanized steel and features a 26 oz. chamber for space-saving waste disposal. The garbage Disposal also features a 1/3 HP motor that rapidly grinds food waste for easy rinsing down the drain.
If the disposal is hit hard enough, it can actually move and shift so that it no longer sits right. The pipes can be moved; the seals can be pressed in an awkward position; or the retaining bolts can loosen. Make sure nothing has been knocked out of place. Then, check to see where the water is coming from and tighten up the bolts. If this does not fix the leak, then you will need to replace the putty or the sealing ring.

Lowe's offers garbage disposals like the InSinkErator Evolution and Badger garbage disposals in various horsepower options. Models with lower horsepower tend to become jammed easily. What if your garbage disposal jams? No problem. Simply locate the hex socket in the center of the underside of the disposal. Grab a hex wrench, put it in the socket, and work it back and forth until you feel the blades loosen up. Once the blades are spinning freely, press the garbage disposal reset button. It's that easy.


In 1977, brothers Bob and Jim Gregory founded Texas Disposal Systems, Inc. with $10,000, one customer, one truck and plenty of determination. Building on a deep commitment to customer satisfaction and environmental preservation, the Gregory Family created a collection of businesses that has become one of the largest independently-owned solid waste collection and disposal companies in central Texas.
IMPORTANT: Whenever you are working on your garbage disposal, inserting items, and/or inserting body parts into your garbage disposal unit, it should be UNPLUGGED and the POWER TO THE GARBAGE DISPOSAL UNIT SHOULD BE OFF!  Failing to do so will put you at risk of SERIOUS INJURY.  Also, if possible avoid placing your hands directly near the blades at the disposal.  If you can, instead use a tool to wedge out items or check the blades for blockage.
Garbage disposals are considered nearly essential for modern kitchens. Installed underneath the sink, they grind up food into particles that will easily flush down a drain. A common problem with garbage disposals is that they will become jammed if too much food is pushed into them or a foreign object falls inside. When jammed, the circuit breaker may trip, cutting the power to the unit. When that happens, it will appear that the garbage disposal motor has burned out even though that may not be the case.
Even the most trustworthy garbage disposal will develop a leak from time to time; however, just because your food waste disposer has developed a leak does not necessarily mean that it needs to be replaced. Doing a little bit of investigating and troubleshooting before deciding to run out and buy a new garbage disposal can mean the difference between spending $10.00 for a replacement and $100.00+ to replace the entire unit.
If your garbage disposal just won’t turn at all, then it’s very likely that the disposal has lost power. Your unit may have blown a circuit, or it could be unplugged. First, check the plug for your garbage disposal to ensure that it’s secure. Next, locate the reset button on the underside of the unit, and push it. If neither of these things fixes the problem, look inside your electrical panel for signs of a tripped circuit.
Fixing a leaky sink flange may be very easy. It could be a simple matter of tightening the bolts that hold the flange onto the sink drain. But if that doesn’t work, you may need to apply a new layer of plumbers putty to seal the flange into place. To do this, you’ll need to loosen the mounting bolts and create enough space between the flange and drain to smear a fresh dab of putty all the way around the drain. Then just re-tighten the bolts and wait a few hours for the putty to form a tight seal.
The InSinkErator Badger 5 1/2 HP Continuous Feed Garbage Disposal features a quick-mounting system that allows for easy installation or replacement of most disposers. This garbage disposal also features a 1/2 HP motor that rapidly grinds food waste for easy rinsing down the drain. The garbage Disposal also features galvanized steel construction for durability.
Lift the sink flange from the top of the sink. Use a plastic putty knife to scrape off the old plumber’s putty around the top of the flange, then wipe off any putty residue with a damp rag. Grab a palmful of plumber’s putty from the container and roll it into an eighth-inch to quarter-inch-wide “rope” with a length roughly equal to the circumference of the flange. Wrap the rope of putty around the top of the flange like a collar, then insert the flange into the sink drain opening until snug. Re-install the mounting assembly and mounting ring (taking care to securely tighten the mounting bolts on the mounting assembly), then re-attach the garbage disposal, drain pipe, and dishwasher hose in the reverse order you detached them.

To replace a rubber gasket, your first step will be to unplug the cord to the garbage disposal and then disconnect the drain. If you have a dishwasher installed in your kitchen, the dishwasher drain hose will need to be disconnected from the disposer. With the cord and appropriate drain lines removed, you can now grasp the sides of the mounting nut and twist it in a counter clockwise motion, which unlocks the garbage disposal. The waste disposer should then drop right down.
Manufacturers’ warranties for garbage disposals range from one year through the lifetime of the unit. One of the best warranties in the industry is the one offered by WasteKing on all of their garbage disposals. Should your disposal system fail due to material defect or mechanical effort during the purchaser’s lifetime, WasteKing will replace the unit for free. This is compliance to the policies provided for by their lifetime warranty.
Many localities in the United States prohibited the use of disposers.[8] For many years, garbage disposers were illegal in New York City because of a perceived threat of damage to the city's sewer system. After a 21-month study with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection,[9] the ban was rescinded in 1997 by local law 1997/071, which amended section 24-518.1, NYC Administrative Code.[10]
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