When you buy a new disposal, the box will contain all the parts you need to install it. Before you jump into removing the old unit, take a few moments to familiarize yourself with all these parts. Put them together in the correct order and try out the locking mechanism. Understanding how everything fits together ahead of time will make the job a cinch.

Why am I writing a review about my beloved garbage disposal? Why am I referring to it as my "beloved" garbage disposal? I replaced a different garbage disposal from Costco; it had lasted a few years before giving up the ghost (the metal teeth within had basically corroded and broken off). Even before it met its untimely end, it had been loud and took a long time to grind things up--despite it being 1-1/4 horsepower!

If you're replacing a commercial garbage disposal, then you'll either want the Drain Strainer with Crown Adapter or the Drain Strainer XL. Both of these models have a universal Crown Adapter on top that serves as a funnel to cover the hole once the commercial garbage disposal has been removed. Note that it doesn't actually attach to the sink bowl, but you'll adjust the legs to get your unit flush underneath the bottom of the sink.


A clogged garbage disposal unit can leak when you try to operate it without removing the clogging. What clogs up garbage disposals? Normally this would be expandable food like rice and pasta. Even large animal bones can also result in clogging and possible leak. Although coffee grounds help eliminate odors, allowing it to accumulate in the drain of the disposer will result in clogging and potential leak.

However, if your garbage disposal is fairly new, having the reset button repaired is a better choice, especially if your unit is still under warranty. If your unit is under warranty, the company will probably send out a repair man to fix the job. On the other hand, if your unit isn’t under warranty, it’s best to have a skilled technician complete the job unless you have experience doing this.
3. Is my plumbing capable of handling the task? If your current plumbing frequently clogs or backs up, then you should NOT install a new garbage disposer. The additional waste that a garbage disposal creates will only increase the chances of one or both happening. Before installing a waste disposer, you’ll need to have the source of the problem identified and fixed.
The General Electric 1/3 Horsepower Continuous Feed is a relatively small unit. One of the most important measurements with garbage disposals is the size of the grind chamber. In this case, it’s 26.5 ounces. Power, at 1/3 horsepower, is at the lower end of the scale, but this is a light-duty machine. The owners we surveyed were very happy with the General Electric’s performance.
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Waste King L-8000: 1 horsepower garbage disposal with pre-installed power cord and sound insulation. Energy efficient permanent magnet motor and stainless steel swivel impellers reduce jamming. Fast and easy to install with a removable splashguard that is easy to clean and replace. Rust and corrosion-proof glass-filled nylon grind chamber and drain housing with stainless steel grinding components. Continuous feed technology. Front-mounted reset button for easy use. Safe to use with properly-sized septic tanks.

Garbage disposals help us get rid of food waste, so it’s not surprising that the appliance may be susceptible to gross smells. A capful of bleach or grinding up citrus peels can help eliminate any foul odors coming from your garbage disposal. However, if nothing seems to help your appliance in the smell department, it may be catching food particles within its crevices. We recommend disassembling your garbage disposal to clean it, or replacing it if it’s old.
Energy usage is not high; typically 500–1,500 W of power is used, comparable to an electric iron, but only for a very short time, totaling approximately 3–4 kWh of electricity per household per year.[34] Daily water usage varies, but is typically 1 US gallon (3.8 l) of water per person per day,[35] comparable to an additional toilet flush.[36] One survey of these food processing units found a slight increase in household water use.[37]

Garbage disposers address the often disparate demands of convenience and conservation by grinding up kitchen scraps, especially non-compostable leftovers like meat and poultry or fat, and sending them down the drain to a sewage-treatment plant or septic system for handling, rather than to the landfill for slow decomposition. Our tests show that some disposers grind more quickly and finely, and are better at resisting jams.
3/4th Horsepower – This garbage disposal model is ideal for households of 4-5 people. It is the model that you will most commonly find in modern day homes. These models are often equipped with more sound dampening features, which reduce the level of noise the unit produces when compared to its lower end cousins. Again, it is recommended that you look for a model with stainless steel grinding components.
Has this ever happened to you? It’s the end of the day and you are dutifully washing your evening dishes.  Your sink isn’t draining quickly, so you flip on the switch of your waste disposer expecting to hear the satisfying sound of your meal remnants being ground into a pulp.  Instead – to your shock and dismay – the disposal only hums, or even worse, does nothing at all. Frustrating, right?
Set the garbage disposal down where you can work on and see the rubber gasket. Peel off the old gasket and put the new gasket in the same place making sure that it pops into the lip and sits flat. Now you are ready to set the garbage disposer back in place. Use your knee or a helper to lift the disposal into place while looking down at it from above the sink to verify that the gasket sits flat before locking it back into place. Then look underneath the sink to make sure that all three mounting grooves are locked in. Reconnect the drains and plug the cord back in to test it for leaks.
Some types of food remains are not easy to grind in a disposer. Do not put fibrous food items into your disposal. Help grind these items by putting in a few small bones or large ice cubes to the disposal. If the disposer won’t grind it up then turn off the disposer and remove the item with a pair of tongs. When using your disposer, make sure that the disposal is running with good water flow. Good water flow carries the waste down the drain line. Using too little water can create a clogged drain.

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For any major issues with the garbage disposal, you should leave the job to a professional plumber only. Reaching your hand into the drain is dangerous, even if you believe the power is shut off. A plumber can help you evaluate the state of your disposal, and decide whether or not you need a new unit. Upgrading to a faster disposal unit with a higher horsepower can help to protect your pipes and make cleaning up after meals even easier.
There are many potential causes for a leaky garbage disposal.  Luckily, identifying the cause of your garbage disposal’s leak is as simple as observing the source of the leak, and repairing the issue yourself is very doable.  Most often, if your garbage disposal is leaking, the cause can be identified and repaired yourself in short time, saving you the cost and hassle of replacing your entire disposal unit.
If you misplaced your wrench that came with the unit, don’t worry. The store you got your unit from should have replacements for as little as $3 to $5. An Allen wrench will usually work well, too. Replacing the motor is the most costly repair for a disposal, so replacing the unit may be your best bet. If the disposal is jammed and won’t budge after using your wrench, turn it off and call us right away.

Because it’s out of sight, it can be easy for some homeowners to forget they even have a garbage disposal — especially if it was installed by a  previous owner. However, an unused unit can rust and seize up, which can lead to leaks and mechanical problems. Make a habit of running your disposal for a minute or so every couple of weeks, even if you don’t actually grind anything.


I did all the things that you said. I finallyt called the home warrenty company. They said that there was a penny stuck and I had to get a new disposal. He took a pciture so I could see. I asked him why he didnt try to get the penny out and he said that he would just replace After he left, I put my hand in to see if I could get the penny lose. I could not see it so I put my hand in again and got all the food out and there was the penny. I then tried to get it to run and it is still humming. What should i do? Do I really need a new disposal?
Remove all wet wipes, tissues, sanitary napkins, paper towels, and anything else in your bathroom that you wouldn't want someone to flush down the toilet. Despite the marketing claims that wet wipes are flushable, they are known for causing clogs and other plumbing problems. If someone needs these materials, they will ask, which will give you a great opportunity to explain what can and cannot be flushed down the toilet.
After using the lowest cost disposers for over 20 years now, I find the newest models have not withstood regular use for more than 5 years. The older models had a blue housing where this next step-up model has a black housing which I am hoping for at least 5 years use. Our oldest (blue housing) disposers have lasted at least 5 years and some are now almost 20 years old.
Disposals can leak at a couple different places. Start by turning off the disposal at its base. Then, find the disposal mount and remove the unit by turning it counterclockwise from the bottom. Once the disposal has been removed from the mount, you should be able to see the three mounting bolts. Tighten these bolts to make sure they’re not leaking.

We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
If this sounds familiar, you'll be happy to know that replacing a disposer is really fairly simple. With today's plastic waste kits, leaks are seldom a problem and the electrical connections are similarly quick and easy. Finally, retail outlets sell good disposers for every household budget. Before you buy, though, it pays to check out your old unit to make sure it's not simply jammed.

Start by turning off and unplugging the garbage disposal. Next, you’ll need the wrench that came with your disposal. If you don’t have it, you can buy a replacement in a hardware store that sells your disposal brand. Find the hex-shaped opening at the bottom of the disposal unit. Turn the wrench clockwise to dislodge whatever’s blocking the flywheel. When the object dislodges, you’ll feel the flywheel start to turn easily. Reset the disposal and run cold water while quickly turning it on and off repeatedly.

Waste disposal units may jam, but can usually be cleared either by forcing the turntable round from above or by turning the motor using a hex-key wrench inserted into the motor shaft from below.[25] Especially hard objects accidentally or deliberately introduced, such as metal cutlery, can damage the waste disposal unit and become damaged themselves, although recent advances, such as swivel impellers, have been made to minimize such damage.[citation needed] More problematic are drain blockages caused by shredded waste that is fibrous, e.g., artichoke leaves, or starchy, e.g., potato peelings.
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