The Camorra received another blow with the Cuocolo trial (1911–1912). While the trial was about the murder of the Camorrista Gennaro Cuocolo and his wife, suspected of being police spies, on June 6, 1906, the main investigator, Carabinieri Captain Carlo Fabbroni, transformed it from a murder trial into one against the Camorra as a whole. Fabbroni intended to use the trial to strike the final blow to the Camorra.[20][21] The trial attracted a lot of attention of newspapers and the general public both in Italy as well as in the United States, including by Pathé's Gazette.[22] The hearings began in the spring of 1911 and would continue for twelve months. After a 17-month trial, the often tumultuous proceedings ended with a guilty verdict on July 8, 1912. The defendants, including 27 leading Camorra bosses, were sentenced to a total of 354 years' imprisonment. The main defendant and nominal head of the Camorra, Enrico Alfano, was sentenced to 30 years.[20][23][24][25]
In 2004 and 2005 the Di Lauro clan and the so-called Scissionisti di Secondigliano fought a bloody feud which came to be known in the Italian press as the Scampia feud. The result was over 100 street killings. At the end of October 2006 a new series of murders took place in Naples between 20 competing clans, that cost 12 lives in 10 days. The Interior Minister Giuliano Amato decided to send more than 1,000 extra police and carabinieri to Naples to fight crime and protect tourists.[31] Despite this, in the following year there were over 120 murders.[citation needed]
Loosen the nut securing the rest of the assembly. Just below the sink flange where the drain empties into the garbage disposal you’ll see a circular plastic piece similar in appearance to the mounting ring. Insert the tip of a screwdriver into one of the lugs on this piece and rotate it in a counterclockwise direction. Pull the nut away and set it aside.[9]
Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.

Loosen the nut securing the rest of the assembly. Just below the sink flange where the drain empties into the garbage disposal you’ll see a circular plastic piece similar in appearance to the mounting ring. Insert the tip of a screwdriver into one of the lugs on this piece and rotate it in a counterclockwise direction. Pull the nut away and set it aside.[9]
Make sure that there is power getting to the unit. Garbage disposals have an independent cord that is plugged into a wall socket beneath the sink. Unplug the disposal unit and plug another small appliance, like a desk fan, into the wall socket. Turn the appliance on to see if it works. If it doesn't work, check the breaker panel. If the breaker is flipped to the "On" position, there is an electrical problem on that circuit, and an electrician must be called in.
If your garbage disposal is making a clicking or rattling sound, there may be some food particles that will not grind up inside. Remove power from disposer, reach into the sink hole with a pair of tongs and remove anything that is still down in the disposer. Test your disposer to be sure the noise is gone. If not continue troubleshooting your disposer issue (see below).
Kitchen waste disposal units increase the load of organic carbon that reaches the water treatment plant, which in turn increases the consumption of oxygen.[28] Metcalf and Eddy quantified this impact as 0.04 pound of biochemical oxygen demand per person per day where disposers are used.[29] An Australian study that compared in-sink food processing to composting alternatives via a life cycle assessment found that while the in-sink disposer performed well with respect to climate change, acidification, and energy usage, it did contribute to eutrophication and toxicity potentials.[30]
At one point, I did have a leak that I eventually determined was due to improper installation. (This was by the same "professional" plumber who reversed the hot and cold supply lines when installing a kitchen faucet. He just didn't connect the drain hose properly.) While investigating the issue, I called Waste King to inquire about possible in-home service or warranty replacement. I was blown away by their level of customer service: no waiting on hold, just an immediate connection to a person who really knew the product and was unexpectedly diligent in resolving my problem -- which, as it turns out, wasn't even their fault.
Look for a jam. Something too tough to grind, such as a piece of glass, could be jamming the motor. Turn off the power and water, then unplug the disposal. (If it’s hardwired, turn off the breaker.) Remove the rubber baffle inside the drain-most just lift out-and shine a flashlight into the hole. Fish out the obstruction with a pair of tongs or needle-nose pliers.
We're expecting a lot of garbage disposal (waste disposal unit and garburator) service calls next week. Thanksgiving and Christmas are behind us, but another major celebratory gathering will take place this weekend. Although not an official holiday, the Super Bowl is considered a great American secular holiday by most. While many advocate for the day off on Super Bowl Monday, this will never happen for plumbers!
One of the handiest appliances in your kitchen is probably something that you don’t think about very often, until it stops working. It’s your garbage disposer, and today I’m going to show you how to replace a garbage disposer under your kitchen sink. This project requires some moderate do-it-yourself skills, and it also requires turning off the electricity to the disposer at the electrical panel. But it’s really not that difficult, so let’s get started.
The bulk of a food waste disposer system, which includes the seals and pipes, is located beneath the kitchen sink. Most homeowners use this space to store various items, and it is not uncommon for people to bump or jar the disposal’s pipes when reaching for an item that is in close proximity. If the pipes are struck hard enough, the pipes can shift so that they are no longer sitting properly. Retaining bolts can become loose. Pipes may move, and seals can shift into an awkward position.
If the disposal is plugged in and doesn’t need to be reset, then you should check the circuit breaker. The breaker could be flipped, which would mean your disposal isn’t getting power. If that’s still not the problem, then either the outlet is dead, the circuit breaker is malfunctioning, or the disposal needs to be replaced. Check the outlet first by plugging something else into it. If the outlet works, try replacing the circuit breaker switch. If that isn’t it either, you have to replace the disposal.
Your garbage disposal is one of the biggest helpers in your kitchen. Without it, cleaning up after quick weeknight dinners, family feasts, and leisurely Sunday breakfasts would be much harder. While some garbage disposal problems can be fixed with a quick repair, sometimes it’s easier and more cost-efficient to replace the appliance. If you’re not sure whether or not to replace or repair your garbage disposal, check out these five signs your appliance is completely broken.
Because it’s out of sight, it can be easy for some homeowners to forget they even have a garbage disposal — especially if it was installed by a  previous owner. However, an unused unit can rust and seize up, which can lead to leaks and mechanical problems. Make a habit of running your disposal for a minute or so every couple of weeks, even if you don’t actually grind anything.
One result is larger amounts of solid residue from the waste-water treatment process. According to a study at the East Bay Municipal Utility District’s wastewater treatment plant funded by the EPA, food waste produces three times the biogas as compared to municipal sewage sludge.[32] The value of the biogas produced from anaerobic digestion of food waste appears to exceed the cost of processing the food waste and disposing of the residual biosolids (based on a LAX Airport proposal to divert 8,000 tons/year of bulk food waste).[33]
If water is leaking from the disposal it more than likely needs a seal replaced but also could be a more serious problem. A leak can occur at the rings that are installed around the sink’s drain hole, called the sink flange. In that case, it can either be that the rings need to be tightened or that the plumber’s putty is faulty and needs to be reapplied correctly.
Hello, We have a Hunter ceiling fan that no longer spins. It has power, as the light still works and when you push the remote you hear the clicking, like it's trying to engage, but the blades do not spin. Does this sound like a possible flywheel issue? I removed the Remote Receiver, part 85112-02, and apparently it's no longer available, but I don't think the receive is the problem. Any feedback would be welcome.
One of the screws on the side of my Badger 5 is rusty and seems to be the source of a very minor leak. If I leave a towel in place under the side of the unit, it will saturate after a week or two. Drain, dishwasher, and sink connections are bone dry. As well as the flange connect at sink. Can I let it be or is this a major disaster waiting to happen?
But to dislodge whatever’s causing it to be in a bind you can use the hex wrench that came with the garbage disposal. I know most people lose them, that’s okay. Grab your set of Allen wrenches, get the right size, insert it into the recess hole right in the bottom of the disposal, and turn it left and right until you dislodge whatever caused it to get into a bind.
Food scraps range from 10% to 20% of household waste,[18] and are a problematic component of municipal waste, creating public health, sanitation and environmental problems at each step, beginning with internal storage and followed by truck-based collection. Burned in waste-to-energy facilities, the high water-content of food scraps means that their heating and burning consumes more energy than it generates; buried in landfills, food scraps decompose and generate methane gas; a greenhouse gas which contributes to climate change.[19]
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