If you misplaced your wrench that came with the unit, don’t worry. The store you got your unit from should have replacements for as little as $3 to $5. An Allen wrench will usually work well, too. Replacing the motor is the most costly repair for a disposal, so replacing the unit may be your best bet. If the disposal is jammed and won’t budge after using your wrench, turn it off and call us right away.

Make sure the reset button on the bottom is not popped out. If your disposal has a cord, make sure it is plugged in and there is power to the disposal. If your disposal has a cord, and there is no power to the disposal, check the breaker or GFI on the wall. If your disposer is hard wired into the wall, check the circuit breaker behind the electrical panel. If humming it is probably jammed. Use the small wrench that can with your disposal to unjam it and stop it from humming.
Run your garbage disposal for longer each time you use it. A mistake many people make is turning off their garbage disposal as soon as the grinding noises stop. It is better to leave the garbage disposal on (with the water running) for several seconds after the grinding noises subside, as there may still be small particles in the disposal unit which have not yet been cleared away.
There are many potential causes for a leaky garbage disposal.  Luckily, identifying the cause of your garbage disposal’s leak is as simple as observing the source of the leak, and repairing the issue yourself is very doable.  Most often, if your garbage disposal is leaking, the cause can be identified and repaired yourself in short time, saving you the cost and hassle of replacing your entire disposal unit.
This thing is exactly as everyone else has described. I, like many others, replaced an old ISE Badger with this unit, and it's heads and shoulders above in quality, function, quietness, etc. It grinds everything in seconds (as opposed to batting it around in the chamber for multiple cycles like the Badger). The original plumbing from the Badger lined right up and worked the first time. I'm very pleased with this item... although, there is one thing that I want to note; I read somewhere that if you use the EZ mount system that comes with it, you won't need plumber's putty - one can just use the gasket. This is true ONLY if using a flat lipped SS sink, and even then the rubber seal is optional as opposed to the putty (you can use only one, the putty or the seal with a SS sink, but not both). It's better said that you WILL need plumber's putty, and if you have a stainless steel sink, you have the option to use the thin rubber gasket (I'd use plumber's putty). Other than that minor detail (which made me take an unexpected run to our local hardware store), this unit is great. The one last thing I will say is around quietness. I've read some reviews that talk about how quiet or not quiet it is. I don't understand the desire to have an ultra-quiet garbage disposal. I mean, one needs to run water while the run the disposal, and a full-blast of the faucet going into a spinning basket creates a notable level of sound anyway, plus I want to be able to hear the load of the disposal so I can know when it's clear. This unit is by no means noisy, but I just don't see the desire to go ultra-quiet. Again, this big-boy Waste King is awesome.
2. Can my septic tank handle the load? Septic tanks are essential in the general installation and use of garbage disposals. If your home is hooked up to a septic tank, then the municipality that you live in may require you to upgrade your septic tank system if you decide to install a garbage disposal. A local building inspector will be able to tell you if you’ll need too. Also, you must take into account that you will be required to empty your septic tank more often.
Garbage disposals aren’t exactly quiet, but the device shouldn’t make a terrible screeching noise either. If your appliance is guilty of shrill sounds, there are a few potential causes. The grates could have shifted causing the device to move incorrectly, or the motor could be worn out. In either case, this usually occurs when a garbage disposal is at the end of its life, so replacement is a good option.
Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.
Cecilia Harsch has been writing professionally since 2009. She writes mainly home improvement, health and travel articles for various online publications. She has several years of experience in the home-improvement industry, focusing on gardening, and a background in group exercise instruction. Harsch received her Certified Nurses Assistant license in 2004. She attended Tarrant County College and studied English composition.

Garbage Disposal Repair

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