Here are some problems that every garbage disposal can run into, old or new. Learning about your garbage disposal and how it works (and how it doesn’t work, of course!) is the first step to decide if it simply needs a repair or if it needs to be replaced all together. One thing that stands for any and all situations: never stick your hands down the drain!
We're expecting a lot of garbage disposal (waste disposal unit and garburator) service calls next week. Thanksgiving and Christmas are behind us, but another major celebratory gathering will take place this weekend. Although not an official holiday, the Super Bowl is considered a great American secular holiday by most. While many advocate for the day off on Super Bowl Monday, this will never happen for plumbers!
There you have it. If you have questions about this or any other home improvement project, be sure to read our list of Frequently Asked Questions for this video. And be sure to print out our Project Instructions, which includes a Tools and Materials checklist, before visiting your local independent home improvement retailer. That’s where you’ll find all the products and helpful advice to complete your project. If you’re not sure where to find your local store, check out our Store Locator.
Located in Benton Harbor, Michigan, the American based Whirlpool Corporation is an international manufacturer and marketer of home appliances. Whirlpool markets many different brands, including KitchenAid, Maytag, Jenn-Air, and Amana. Their line of in sink disposers offer an affordable entry level option for homeowners who want to install a garbage disposal in their home.

I've always had Insinkerator garbage disposals so I just didn't know any better but now I do. Simply put, this is truly the king of garbage disposals. The amount of power it has is ridiculous and it will tear through just about any food I've thrown at it. Now, I have been hesitant to test it with some tougher items (I've heard stories of people feeding it chicken and rib bones) because I was always taught to be careful what you put down the disposal (a cheap wimpy unit in a relative's shore house seizes up with unpopped corn kernels and their home unit clogged with shredded zucchini). I have given it some things like apple cores though with absolutely no problem. I never would have put an apple core down my old Insinkerator. This king eats the core in about 3-5 seconds, if that. Completely gone. The thing that absolutely astounds me about this unit though is how QUIET it is. It's almost ridiculous. My old one, and most everyone else's I've ever heard sounds like an electric chain saw. This one sounds like someone is humming. When people come over I run it form them just to show off how quiet it is. I know. I'm weird. Add to that a lifetime warranty and this thing just cannot be beat for the money. Google it yourself and you will see how many people agree that this is the best value disposal available. The cheap Insinkerators will normally run you about $80. It's not that much more to get one of these and the benefits for the small price increase are totally worth it. For 50% more you get way more than a 50% better disposal. Of course you could spend $350 on the Insinkerator Elite but is that one going to be 300% better. I doubt it. If you found this review helpful please click yes below.


First drop the garbage disposal down like in step 3. Loosen the 3 bolts that tighten the flange in place. Then locate the clip that holds the bottom flange in place. Use a flat screwdriver to pop the clip out of its groove. Then pull the top flange out from the top of the sink. Clean the area around the sink opening before reinstalling the flange making sure to remove any old putty.
Connect the connector pipe to the elbow and the adjacent sink. Use the connector pipe to connect the elbow piece to the T-fitting on the adjacent sink. The connector piece might need to be cut down to the correct length depending on your sink. Use the nuts and washers provided with your pipes to secure the pieces together using the tongue-and-groove pliers.[1]
A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.

Have you ever opened the cabinets under the sink to remove the trash or a handful of cleaning products, only to find everything soaked and soggy? Have you ever installed – or even had professionally installed – a brand new, state-of-the-art garbage disposal, only to have it flood your kitchen floor the next day? If so, you have a major plumbing: a leaking garbage disposal leaking from.


Attach the pipes. You will attach a 90-degree disposal drainpipe to the disposal and the tailpiece to the other sink drain. There should be p-traps on both the disposal and the tailpiece from the other sink and they should be level to one another. Use straight pipes and a T-fitting to connect both drains into one line and route the drainpipes into the main drain.

To be prepared, measure the distance from the outlet to the top of each disposal before you remove the old unit. If the new unit’s outlet is lower, you must also lower the tee that the discharge pipe connects to. Loosen the two nuts that connect the tee to the tailpiece above and the trap below. Try lowering the tee to see if the tailpiece is long enough. If it’s not, you’ll have to replace it with one that’s slightly longer.
I've always had Insinkerator garbage disposals so I just didn't know any better but now I do. Simply put, this is truly the king of garbage disposals. The amount of power it has is ridiculous and it will tear through just about any food I've thrown at it. Now, I have been hesitant to test it with some tougher items (I've heard stories of people feeding it chicken and rib bones) because I was always taught to be careful what you put down the disposal (a cheap wimpy unit in a relative's shore house seizes up with unpopped corn kernels and their home unit clogged with shredded zucchini). I have given it some things like apple cores though with absolutely no problem. I never would have put an apple core down my old Insinkerator. This king eats the core in about 3-5 seconds, if that. Completely gone. The thing that absolutely astounds me about this unit though is how QUIET it is. It's almost ridiculous. My old one, and most everyone else's I've ever heard sounds like an electric chain saw. This one sounds like someone is humming. When people come over I run it form them just to show off how quiet it is. I know. I'm weird. Add to that a lifetime warranty and this thing just cannot be beat for the money. Google it yourself and you will see how many people agree that this is the best value disposal available. The cheap Insinkerators will normally run you about $80. It's not that much more to get one of these and the benefits for the small price increase are totally worth it. For 50% more you get way more than a 50% better disposal. Of course you could spend $350 on the Insinkerator Elite but is that one going to be 300% better. I doubt it. If you found this review helpful please click yes below.

You can buy a 1/3-hp disposal for $80 or less, but our experts suggest that a more expensive unit with at least 3/4 hp would be a better choice. The more powerful the motor, the less chance it will jam. In addition, higher-priced disposals are generally quieter and have longer warranties. If you need to replace the splash guard guard as part of your garbage disposal installation, take a look at this guide.
Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person.

Garbage Disposal Repair

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