Badger Series garbage disposals are the choice of homeowners looking for hard-working helpers in the kitchen that are as tough on food waste as they are easy on the wallet. The value and price is unbeatable. A powerful, 1/2 HP Dura-Drive motor powers the Badger 5 through your food waste including: vegetables, fruits, leftovers, egg shells, celery stalks, and small bones.
Read the directions for your model before attempting a home repair. Most disposals have an electrical reset button, and a manual hex key for un-jamming. If the disposal stops working, its internal circuit breaker may have shut it off. Turn the switch definitely off, and try to pull out the hard object that may have jammed it. Then use the right-sized hex key to manually turn the rotor parts (usually directly under the unit in the center). If it turns, then push the reset button. It usually clicks in. Then, turn on the water and try the power, again.
As one of the most important fixtures in your kitchen, your garbage disposal goes through extreme wear and tear on a day-to-day basis. To avoid accidental injury or further damage, don’t attempt to fix any unknown garbage disposal problems yourself. Instead, call the plumbers at Benjamin Franklin Plumbing to solve your problesm, whether you need  a repair, unclogging, or replacement.
The bulk of a food waste disposer system, which includes the seals and pipes, is located beneath the kitchen sink. Most homeowners use this space to store various items, and it is not uncommon for people to bump or jar the disposal’s pipes when reaching for an item that is in close proximity. If the pipes are struck hard enough, the pipes can shift so that they are no longer sitting properly. Retaining bolts can become loose. Pipes may move, and seals can shift into an awkward position.

Inspect each of these locations while gliding a light-colored rag over the unit; the dyed water will readily show on the rag and reveal the location of the leak. If a leak isn’t immediately apparent, remove the sink stopper and pour a few more cups of dyed water down the sink drain, then check for leaks again. Leaks near the top of the unit are more likely to show themselves while the sink is plugged, while side and bottom leaks are more noticeable while the sink is unplugged.
Attach the pipes. You will attach a 90-degree disposal drainpipe to the disposal and the tailpiece to the other sink drain. There should be p-traps on both the disposal and the tailpiece from the other sink and they should be level to one another. Use straight pipes and a T-fitting to connect both drains into one line and route the drainpipes into the main drain.
If the disposal’s still leaking, loosen the mounting bolts and push the sink flange up until it’s slightly higher than the surface of the sink. Apply fresh plumber’s putty to the threshold between the flange and the sink. When you’ve applied enough, re-attach the unit by putting the bolts back and tightening. Wipe away excess putty that squeezed out. Finish re-installing by replacing the disposal unit on the mount. Turn the disposal back on and look for leaks.

This thing is exactly as everyone else has described. I, like many others, replaced an old ISE Badger with this unit, and it's heads and shoulders above in quality, function, quietness, etc. It grinds everything in seconds (as opposed to batting it around in the chamber for multiple cycles like the Badger). The original plumbing from the Badger lined right up and worked the first time. I'm very pleased with this item... although, there is one thing that I want to note; I read somewhere that if you use the EZ mount system that comes with it, you won't need plumber's putty - one can just use the gasket. This is true ONLY if using a flat lipped SS sink, and even then the rubber seal is optional as opposed to the putty (you can use only one, the putty or the seal with a SS sink, but not both). It's better said that you WILL need plumber's putty, and if you have a stainless steel sink, you have the option to use the thin rubber gasket (I'd use plumber's putty). Other than that minor detail (which made me take an unexpected run to our local hardware store), this unit is great. The one last thing I will say is around quietness. I've read some reviews that talk about how quiet or not quiet it is. I don't understand the desire to have an ultra-quiet garbage disposal. I mean, one needs to run water while the run the disposal, and a full-blast of the faucet going into a spinning basket creates a notable level of sound anyway, plus I want to be able to hear the load of the disposal so I can know when it's clear. This unit is by no means noisy, but I just don't see the desire to go ultra-quiet. Again, this big-boy Waste King is awesome.
To remove the gasket and replace it you will first have to disconnect the drain and unplug the cord to the garbage disposal. Also, if you have a dishwasher you will have to remove the dishwasher drain hose from the garbage disposal. With the drains and cord removed you can now take hold of the sides of the mounting nut and twist it counter clockwise to unlock the garbage disposal. The disposal should drop straight down.
If the disposal’s still leaking, loosen the mounting bolts and push the sink flange up until it’s slightly higher than the surface of the sink. Apply fresh plumber’s putty to the threshold between the flange and the sink. When you’ve applied enough, re-attach the unit by putting the bolts back and tightening. Wipe away excess putty that squeezed out. Finish re-installing by replacing the disposal unit on the mount. Turn the disposal back on and look for leaks.
Chartered by entrepreneur Lowell Harrelson and Long Island mob boss Salvatore Avellino, it set sail on March 22 from Islip, New York,[2] escorted by the tugboat Break of Dawn and carrying 3,168 tons of trash headed for a pilot program in Morehead City, North Carolina, to be turned into methane. The barge was docked at Morehead City, until a WRAL-TV news crew, acting on a tip, flew by helicopter to the coast to investigate. Action News 5 Reporter Susan Brozek broke the story on the 6 p.m. news on April 1, 1987, and North Carolina officials began their own investigation, which resulted in an order for the Mobro to move on.
Physically remove lodged objects. If a large object has become lodged in your garbage disposal, you will need to remove it before proceeding with the cleaning process. First, it is important that you turn off the fuse that supplies power to the disposal unit. This is to ensure that it does not turn on during cleaning. Alternatively, you may be able to unplug it from under the sink, depending on the design.
Warranty - The average industry warranty on a garbage disposal is one year; however, it is not uncommon to see manufacturers’ warranties that can extend up to ten years. As a general rule of thumb, the more comprehensive and longer a warranty is, the more confidence the manufacturer has in the product they have made, but this is not always the case, so it is still important to do your homework.
Most seals and pipes are located beneath your kitchen sink.  It is common for these pipes to be jarred when people are using that space.  If the pipes are struck hard enough, they can shift and sit improperly, causing retaining bolts to loosen and seals to be shifted into awkward positions.  If your leak is coming from this area, you will need to reattach and reseal these pipes.  Fixing this issue may require an experienced, licensed plumber.

This part of the installation starts by removing the old mounting ring by loosening the mounting screws and then removing the snap ring, which holds the mounting assembly on the sink flange. You’ll need to use a flathead screwdriver to remove the snap ring. Next, remove the mounting ring by inserting the screwdriver into the tabs and turning the mounting ring assembly until it is free from the tabs. Be sure to support the bottom of the disposer as you do this. After this comes off, the entire mounting assembly will come free from the sink flange. Once free, pull the sink flange out from the top of the sink and scrape or wipe any old putty off the sink before wiping it clean with a towel.
Cecilia Harsch has been writing professionally since 2009. She writes mainly home improvement, health and travel articles for various online publications. She has several years of experience in the home-improvement industry, focusing on gardening, and a background in group exercise instruction. Harsch received her Certified Nurses Assistant license in 2004. She attended Tarrant County College and studied English composition.
Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person. 

Garbage Disposal Repair

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