Kitchen waste appliances are necessary for every home. You are able to quickly get rid of all types of waste with ease. First thing’s first, which type is better for your home – a trash compactor or garbage disposal? Many people think the terms are interchangeable, but they function in two different capacities. A disposal is great for getting rid softer food wastes, such as mashed potatoes, veggies, noodles, and rice. Harder to grind foods, such as chicken bones, vegetable peels and egg shells, are best suited for a stainless steel trash compactor. You can even place plastic and glass bottles in the compactor.

I'm not what you'd call a handyman, although I've been working to get better at that. I will now at least try a home project before passing on it. So, when our 15-year garbage disposal died I had another opportunity. I determined our old unit to be a Badger 5 1/2 HP (this exact item). I didn't have time to wait for the item to arrive from Amazon so I went to Home Depot and coughed up an extra $20 for the Badger 500 - Home Depot's branded version of this item. They are identical except for the name & sticker.

If the disposal’s still leaking, loosen the mounting bolts and push the sink flange up until it’s slightly higher than the surface of the sink. Apply fresh plumber’s putty to the threshold between the flange and the sink. When you’ve applied enough, re-attach the unit by putting the bolts back and tightening. Wipe away excess putty that squeezed out. Finish re-installing by replacing the disposal unit on the mount. Turn the disposal back on and look for leaks.


See The Drain Strainer™ with Crown Adapter installation instructions and dimensions (or the XL installation instructions and dimensions below for taller sinks) below to see the actual dimensions for each model. The legs can adjust up to an additional 5 inches and you can add as many sets of 6 inch leg extensions as needed to achieve the proper total height.
The quick resolution of the Kuchino problem was covered favorably in the Russian media, but hardly represents a systemic response to the problem of municipal waste disposal. In fact, Putin’s recognition of what he called “the legitimate negative reaction of people” to widespread problems with trash disposal may have emboldened protesters near other landfills.
Like most appliances with moving parts, all kinds of stuff can go wrong in your disposal, for all sorts of reasons. Luckily, unlike many appliances, most disposals can be quickly and relatively easily fixed, as long as you’re careful and do your research. The next time you experience one of the following problems, follow these instructions and see if you can’t get things moving again.
Cecilia Harsch has been writing professionally since 2009. She writes mainly home improvement, health and travel articles for various online publications. She has several years of experience in the home-improvement industry, focusing on gardening, and a background in group exercise instruction. Harsch received her Certified Nurses Assistant license in 2004. She attended Tarrant County College and studied English composition.
Release the old disposal from the mounting ring. At the top of the unit you should see a thin metal ring with 3 separate lugs, or protruding arms. Take hold of these lugs with one hand and twist the entire ring counterclockwise about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) to dislodge the old unit. Set it aside on a sheet of newspaper or unfolded rag to keep from making a mess.[4]
For over 75 years InSinkErator has been known for building the world's best food waste disposers. Badger, our standard disposer line, is basic, reliable, and functional. Available in various models and sizes for a range of applications, InSinkErator also manufactures a premier line of disposers, the Evolution Series. InSinkErator food waste disposers are the only disposers that are proudly made in the U.S.A. InSinkErator has grown into the largest food waste disposer manufacturer and best-selling garbage disposer brand in the world.
Next, you’ll connect the wires that you disconnected from the old disposer, to the new disposer. If this isn’t a replacement project, and you’re adding a new disposer where you didn’t have one before, you’ll first need to call an electrician to run the proper wires and a wall switch to the unit. For our project, the electrical wires and switch were already in place.
As a general rule of thumb, the heavier and bigger that a garbage disposal is, the more quietly it will operate – so long as it fits properly underneath your sink. Even though the sound dampening technology used in the design of garbage disposals has improved dramatically in the last 10 years, it is unrealistic to expect your garbage disposal to operate noise free. Under specific sinks, some disposals will be noisier than others due to the amount of vibration they produce. Ideally, you should look for a garbage disposal that features a nylon, insulated grinding chamber, like those produced by WasteKing.

Release the old disposal from the mounting ring. At the top of the unit you should see a thin metal ring with 3 separate lugs, or protruding arms. Take hold of these lugs with one hand and twist the entire ring counterclockwise about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) to dislodge the old unit. Set it aside on a sheet of newspaper or unfolded rag to keep from making a mess.[4]


If you are connecting the disposal to a dishwasher, it may be connected through an air gap. Use a hose clamp to attach the drain hose to the dishwasher inlet. Now that everything is installed and in position, lock the disposal to the sink mounting assembly using the wrenchette that came with the unit. For Evolution models, insert the Quiet Collar® Sink Baffle into the sink opening by pressing it into the sink until it snaps into place. (See Fig 7d)


Place the garbage disposal on a wide, clean work surface and locate the rubber gasket. The old gasket should be peeled off, and the new gasket should be mounted in the same spot. Take extra care to make sure that it sits flat and that it pops into the lip. Now you are ready to re-install your garbage disposal. Plug the cord back in reconnect each of the drains to make sure that there are no leaks.
Locate the leak. Wipe off the disposal unit with a dry rag. Run water into the unit and turn it on. There are four places where the disposal unit may leak. At the top main seal, at the drain pipe, at the optional dishwasher inlet or along the garbage disposal body. Notice where the water is coming from. If the unit is wet at the very top, the main seal is leaking. If the area beneath the drain pipe is wet, the gasket is leaking. If the hose from the dishwasher feed drips, the hose or clamp may be faulty. If water is running out the bottom of the unit but the inlets and outlet are dry, the unit itself has developed a leak and must be replaced.

We apologize in advanced for stating the obvious, but… garbage disposals absolutely do not last forever! No matter how well it’s made or how much money you spend, any appliance that is exposed to thousands of gallons of running water, dish soap, scraps of food, bones, and the rare (we hope) spoon or lime wedge that accidentally gets dropped into the drain is going to wear out in due time. A unit that’s working well should be able to handle a few scraps of veggies or apple slices in a matter of a couple of seconds. If your garbage disposal seems to take forever to accomplish a simple grinding job, makes a strange noise or emits a nasty smell, it may be time to install a new one.

Using a garbage disposal is the swift and environmentally easy alternative to removing food waste from your kitchen. A garbage disposal is made to efficiently eliminate leftover food waste by grinding remains into fine particles that are easily flushed away. When shopping, look for a few key features before purchasing a garbage disposal, such as what type you will need? How much horsepower do you want? Are there any special features that you require? We also recommend to check if your waste goes to a septic tank, as this can determine the specific type you will need.
Food scraps range from 10% to 20% of household waste,[18] and are a problematic component of municipal waste, creating public health, sanitation and environmental problems at each step, beginning with internal storage and followed by truck-based collection. Burned in waste-to-energy facilities, the high water-content of food scraps means that their heating and burning consumes more energy than it generates; buried in landfills, food scraps decompose and generate methane gas; a greenhouse gas which contributes to climate change.[19]
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