At one point, I did have a leak that I eventually determined was due to improper installation. (This was by the same "professional" plumber who reversed the hot and cold supply lines when installing a kitchen faucet. He just didn't connect the drain hose properly.) While investigating the issue, I called Waste King to inquire about possible in-home service or warranty replacement. I was blown away by their level of customer service: no waiting on hold, just an immediate connection to a person who really knew the product and was unexpectedly diligent in resolving my problem -- which, as it turns out, wasn't even their fault.
One of the Camorra's strategies to gain social prestige is political patronage. The family clans became the preferred interlocutors of local politicians and public officials, because of their grip on the community. In turn, the family bosses used their political sway to assist and protect their clients against the local authorities. Through a mixture of brute force, political status, and social leadership, the Camorra family clans imposed themselves as middlemen between the local community and bureaucrats and politicians at the national level. They granted privileges and protection, and intervened in favour of their clients in return for their silence and connivance against local authorities and the police. With their political connections, the heads of the major Neapolitan families became power brokers in local and national political contexts, providing Neapolitan politicians with broad electoral support, and in return receiving benefits for their constituency.[26]
This is one of the biggest problems I’ve come across. When you start to notice a leak underneath your sink, it’s very easy to blame the quality of your garbage disposal. As you browse through the reviews on our website, you will probably notice I rarely mention a problem with leaking (if at all). This is because for the most part, the problem isn’t your unit but they way it has either been installed, or you could have a problem with the pipes it’s connected to.
Most blog writers make money from the links they include, so if someone is reading this and decides to click on a link and purchase the item, they receive a small sales commission per se. Mind you it takes hundreds to thousands of these blogs ranking high in google searches (I’m sure you have an issue with most people using googleopoly as well) in order to make any real money at it, but until other brands get on the bandwagon and pay instead of hoping for free advertising, great bloggers will continue to use what pays the bills. Or at least kicks you back a free tank of gas or two a year.
As one of the most important fixtures in your kitchen, your garbage disposal goes through extreme wear and tear on a day-to-day basis. To avoid accidental injury or further damage, don’t attempt to fix any unknown garbage disposal problems yourself. Instead, call the plumbers at Benjamin Franklin Plumbing to solve your problesm, whether you need  a repair, unclogging, or replacement.
Turn off the garbage disposal at the breaker box. Remove the drain pipe if it is leaking there. Most attachment clamps are wire clamps with two protruding wires that are pushed together to release the drain pipe. Push the wires together and remove the clamp. Pull the pipe off and inspect the seal for any debris that may have lodged between the seal and the pipe. Wipe the seal with a damp rag to remove any dirt, debris or food particles. Sometimes the wire clamp loses tension. In that case, tighten the hose clamp down in its place, which may secure the pipe leak-free.
If the source is not a connection from above then your disposal needs to be replaced. Try cupping your hands around the very top under the sink while running water. The ring that seals the gasket turns clockwise to tighten. The only other repairable leak would be where the piping comes out the side. There can also be a smaller dishwasher drain hose above that.
I have a Bosch condenser dryer that heats up and after 3-5 mins cuts out (no lights/power). After is cools a while, the machine can be restarted and runs a while longer until it shuts down again. This process repeats several times, with each progressive drying cycle being a little longer than the previous until the clothes are eventually dry.I've tested the the thermal-protector for continuity and the NTC-sensor on the heating element appears to be fine (tested for resistance). Could it be a faulty sensor/component on the control board that's getting too hot and cutting out the power? And if so, can it be easily identified/replaced, or would I need to replace the whole control board?Any help would be greatly appreciated!
2. Can my septic tank handle the load? Septic tanks are essential in the general installation and use of garbage disposals. If your home is hooked up to a septic tank, then the municipality that you live in may require you to upgrade your septic tank system if you decide to install a garbage disposal. A local building inspector will be able to tell you if you’ll need too. Also, you must take into account that you will be required to empty your septic tank more often.
Throw some ice down once in a while. While ice will not sharpen the shredders (as is commonly believed) it does knock off any debris buildup on the sharp edges that keeps them from grinding food properly. For better results, make special ice cubes from pure lemon juice or vinegar, or alternate with biodegradable cleanser (label them in your freezer!) Cover and seal ice trays used in your freezer for cleanser, and do not reuse trays for food or drink after having been used for cleanser. While using the disposal, be sure to run cold water at the same time.
Your garbage disposal gasket is the top rim where the rubber seal mounts to the flange.  If your disposer is leaking from this area, the cause could be a leaky gasket.  Gasket leaks can have several causes: ageing gaskets can develop leaks; long periods of disuse can dry the gasket and cause it to leak; if your garbage disposal was removed and then replaced, the gasket may have been improperly sealed; if the gasket is not locked evenly on all three sides, it will leak.
Once you have a garbage disposer installed, maintenance is what keeps your unit going. By following this link, you will find a very easy to follow video which details some simple steps to help keep your disposal unit clean, and your kitchen free of bad smells and harmful bacteria. You see, my website isn’t just about telling you to buy this model or that right now or you’ll miss out on some good deals (although I have mentioned a couple of places you can take a look at if you’re interested), it’s about making sure you get the best from your garbage disposer.
A garbage disposal unit (also known as a garbage disposal, waste disposal unit, garbage disposer, or in Canadian English a garburator) is a device, usually electrically powered, installed under a kitchen sink between the sink's drain and the trap. The disposal unit shreds food waste into pieces small enough—generally less than 2 mm (0.079 in)—to pass through plumbing.[1]
Run cold water while the disposal is on. Keep disposer and water running for 30 to 60 seconds AFTER the waste matter has cleared your drain. The waste still has a distance to go. Cold water keeps the motor, bearings and shredder assembly from overheating. It also lets the waste go down easier because the water is pushing it down. Don't use hot water, because it can melt fat and allow it to re-solidify as a blockage further down in the drain.
Whether you repaired or replaced the leaking garbage disposal, test for any missed problem spots. Wipe the unit dry with a clean cloth, then unplug the sink drain (if plugged) and pour a few cups of dyed water into the drain once more. Use a flashlight to inspect the entire unit. If you don’t observe a leak, turn on the power to the disposal from your breaker box and plug in the disposal at the wall outlet.

We hate to say it, but stoppages in garbage disposals are generally due to “operator error”. Either we have put too much in at one time or tried to force something through, smashing it with a spoon (there is that pesky spoon again!). Pasta, rice and salad are killers of garbage disposal drains and really need to be put down the drain in small amounts; if you put half a pot of rice in at the same time you definitely stand the change up plugging up the pipes under your sink.
Like most appliances with moving parts, all kinds of stuff can go wrong in your disposal, for all sorts of reasons. Luckily, unlike many appliances, most disposals can be quickly and relatively easily fixed, as long as you’re careful and do your research. The next time you experience one of the following problems, follow these instructions and see if you can’t get things moving again.
If some bad odors are coming from your disposal, it can mean that it is not chopping up the food finely and there are drainage issues. Try putting lemons peels (not wedges, y’all) through it first and see if that removes the odor. If that doesn’t help or if the smell returns frequently, that may be telling you that that the disposal isn’t swallowing and chopping up your leftovers correctly.
A garbage disposal unit (also known as a garbage disposal, waste disposal unit, garbage disposer, or in Canadian English a garburator) is a device, usually electrically powered, installed under a kitchen sink between the sink's drain and the trap. The disposal unit shreds food waste into pieces small enough—generally less than 2 mm (0.079 in)—to pass through plumbing.[1]
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