But there is really only one rule you need to follow: Never put your hand or fingers down into the disposal, even if you think the disposal has been unplugged or its circuit has been shut off. If a disposal gets turned on accidentally while your fingers are in the opening, the likelihood is that you will end up with bruised fingers, not bloody amputation. But this is not a risk that is necessary in any way.


In the short story "The Fate of Faustina" by E. W. Hornung, it is revealed that the main character and criminal-in-hiding A. J. Raffles has made an enemy of a high-level member of the Camorra from his time spent in Italy. In the sequel story, "The Last Laugh", the Camorra try to realize that threat and kill Raffles; however, Raffles not only saves himself from his attackers but also tricks them into poisoning themselves.


Jump up ^ Specter, Michael (22 June 1992). "Only in New York: Garbage Disposers, Banned, Stir Debate". New York Times. Most major cities banned garbage disposers after World War II, driven by worries that ground food would clog sewer pipes beneath their booming neighborhoods. ... But a series of studies from universities and the not completely disinterested plumbing industry showed that the additional waste from ground food scraps would rarely harm a city sewage system.
Food scraps range from 10% to 20% of household waste,[18] and are a problematic component of municipal waste, creating public health, sanitation and environmental problems at each step, beginning with internal storage and followed by truck-based collection. Burned in waste-to-energy facilities, the high water-content of food scraps means that their heating and burning consumes more energy than it generates; buried in landfills, food scraps decompose and generate methane gas; a greenhouse gas which contributes to climate change.[19]
This part of the installation starts by removing the old mounting ring by loosening the mounting screws and then removing the snap ring, which holds the mounting assembly on the sink flange. You’ll need to use a flathead screwdriver to remove the snap ring. Next, remove the mounting ring by inserting the screwdriver into the tabs and turning the mounting ring assembly until it is free from the tabs. Be sure to support the bottom of the disposer as you do this. After this comes off, the entire mounting assembly will come free from the sink flange. Once free, pull the sink flange out from the top of the sink and scrape or wipe any old putty off the sink before wiping it clean with a towel.
With the garbage disposal shopping, I quickly learned that the big brands are Waste King and Sinkerator and that those were the two best places to start. After going over several models and two trips to two separate best buys (who, by the way, really need to amp up their customer service model) I cheated and had my mom choose one for me. Sue me. So she chose this particular brand, and wow—it works really well, I can’t believe how easy it makes ... full review

Your electrical supply wires should include a black (or hot) wire, a white (or neutral) wire and either a green or a bare wire, which is the ground wire. First remove the electrical cover plate on the bottom of the new disposer. Then move the new disposer into the cabinet. Screw the threaded end of the cable connector into the round hole on the bottom of the disposer. You’ll run your electrical supply wires through the cable connector and up through the access hole.
If the leak occurred in either of the two connections (smaller = dishwasher, larger = sewer) exiting the side of your disposal unit, it’s a pretty straightforward fix. Loosen the metal clamps on these hoses and make sure the rubber gaskets inside are not falling apart. If needed, replace these gaskets. Reattach the hoses and re-clamp the connections with new metal clamps.
Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.
If there is no item stuck in the blades of the disposal obtain the Allen wrench that should be attached to your disposal or that came with it. There is a breaker socket located on the bottom of most disposal brands. Place the Allen wrench in the breaker socket and turn it back and forth. By doing this you may be able to unlock the source of the problem. Just be certain that the disposal is not turned on when doing this.
The 2 800 RPM motor-powered dual stainless-steel swivel The 2 800 RPM motor-powered dual stainless-steel swivel impellers built into this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal join forces with a 2-level pre-cutter to make it easy to grind undesirable waste into easily drainable particles. The disposer's large-capacity disposer chamber is comprised of a cold-rolled carbon steel armature shaft ...  More + Product Details Close

No need to worry if your garbage disposal is on the fritz—installing a new one is a straightforward project that you can do yourself in just a few minutes. Start by switching off the power to the disposal at your home’s breaker box to ensure that you can work safely. Next, remove the old unit by detaching it from the mounting ring directly beneath the sink drain. Finally, install any necessary new mounting hardware, fit the new disposal into place, and turn on the water to test for leaks before giving it a trial run.
Read the directions for your model before attempting a home repair. Most disposals have an electrical reset button, and a manual hex key for un-jamming. If the disposal stops working, its internal circuit breaker may have shut it off. Turn the switch definitely off, and try to pull out the hard object that may have jammed it. Then use the right-sized hex key to manually turn the rotor parts (usually directly under the unit in the center). If it turns, then push the reset button. It usually clicks in. Then, turn on the water and try the power, again.
• Run water before and after you use the disposal If something has been put in the disposal that should not have been, use tongs or pliers to pull the material out. Never use your hand. To clean a garbage disposal of built-up sludge and debris, fill it with ice cubes and a cup of rock salt and then run it for about five seconds. If your garbage disposal smells bad, you can deodorize it by running warm water down it while you grind a quartered lemon.
Kitchen garbage disposals are wondrous appliances, helping to clean away unwanted food scraps in a jiffy. Even though they are normally self-cleaning, garbage disposals need a little love and attention from time to time. This keeps them in tip-top condition and prevents odors from forming. This article will provide you with easy step-by-step instructions on how to safely clean your garbage disposal and effectively eliminate odors, while also providing some useful info on garbage disposal maintenance.
Look for a jam. Something too tough to grind, such as a piece of glass, could be jamming the motor. Turn off the power and water, then unplug the disposal. (If it’s hardwired, turn off the breaker.) Remove the rubber baffle inside the drain-most just lift out-and shine a flashlight into the hole. Fish out the obstruction with a pair of tongs or needle-nose pliers.
If there is nothing visible clogging your disposal unit, the flip switch on your garbage disposal unit may have turned the unit off. This little red switch is located underneath your unit and protects against overheating and arcing situations. You can try pushing the red switch to reset the garbage disposal unit. Test your unit by turning it on. If it still won't turn on or makes a humming noise, unplug the unit or turn it off at the breaker box, and move to step 4.
The horror movie image of victims having hands and arms severed in a garbage disposal is entirely a Hollywood invention. In reality, the blades inside a garbage disposal are rather dull grinders, not gleaming, razor-sharp sabers. That is not to say that a disposal should be taken lightly—it is indeed possible to be painfully injured if you don't practice basic safety measures. 
If your garbage disposal is not running, first check to see if it is plugged in and receiving power. If so then check to see whether it will turn freely with your service wrench. Most disposers are sent with a self service wrench. The wrench is silver and should be located on or near your garbage disposal. (Check under your sink!) If it will not turn freely using the wrench, the disposal is most likely jammed. Check to see if the reset button has popped out.
Some jams you can free and get the motor to spin and sound like it is working, but the blades are stuck in one position and can’t spin freely to do their job properly. This is very common problem – the motor works so we think everything is working. Not the case! This can lead to stoppages, food trapped in the disposal and a bad smell. These blades can’t be repaired. The disposal needs to be replaced.

This thing is exactly as everyone else has described. I, like many others, replaced an old ISE Badger with this unit, and it's heads and shoulders above in quality, function, quietness, etc. It grinds everything in seconds (as opposed to batting it around in the chamber for multiple cycles like the Badger). The original plumbing from the Badger lined right up and worked the first time. I'm very pleased with this item... although, there is one thing that I want to note; I read somewhere that if you use the EZ mount system that comes with it, you won't need plumber's putty - one can just use the gasket. This is true ONLY if using a flat lipped SS sink, and even then the rubber seal is optional as opposed to the putty (you can use only one, the putty or the seal with a SS sink, but not both). It's better said that you WILL need plumber's putty, and if you have a stainless steel sink, you have the option to use the thin rubber gasket (I'd use plumber's putty). Other than that minor detail (which made me take an unexpected run to our local hardware store), this unit is great. The one last thing I will say is around quietness. I've read some reviews that talk about how quiet or not quiet it is. I don't understand the desire to have an ultra-quiet garbage disposal. I mean, one needs to run water while the run the disposal, and a full-blast of the faucet going into a spinning basket creates a notable level of sound anyway, plus I want to be able to hear the load of the disposal so I can know when it's clear. This unit is by no means noisy, but I just don't see the desire to go ultra-quiet. Again, this big-boy Waste King is awesome.

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The MOEN GX PRO Series of garbage disposals The MOEN GX PRO Series of garbage disposals packs all the standard features and reliable performance into a sleek and compact form ideal for professionals and consumers alike. Installation is simplified with the Universal Xpress Mount which fits on all MOEN and most existing 3-bolt mounting assemblies. Eliminate everyday kitchen ...  More + Product Details Close
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