Connect the new mounting assembly. Working in reverse order now, slide a rubber gasket over the bottom of the new sink flange, followed by a second metal flange. Position the new mounting ring last and insert screws into each of the open screw holes. Hold the assembly in place with one hand while you tighten the screws up against the lower flange with the other.[14]
Some towns and cities require a homeowner to get a permit before being allowed to install a new food disposal system. Others have outright outlawed the use of disposals due to limited sewer and water capacity. For example, an increasing number of cities in California has banned the installation of new garbage disposers in homes due to the ongoing drought the state is suffering from.
Rotate the disposer to align the disposer with the drain or the discharge tube, slide the flange over drain pipe or discharge tube and insert the gasket into the discharge outlet. Then screw in the bolts that secure the flange to the disposer. Reconnect all the plumbing connections as well as the dishwasher inlet hose. Then turn the power back on at the electrical supply panel and test the unit for leaks, making sure to run cold water while the unit is running.

Make sure the reset button on the bottom is not popped out. If your disposal has a cord, make sure it is plugged in and there is power to the disposal. If your disposal has a cord, and there is no power to the disposal, check the breaker or GFI on the wall. If your disposer is hard wired into the wall, check the circuit breaker behind the electrical panel. If humming it is probably jammed. Use the small wrench that can with your disposal to unjam it and stop it from humming.


Single Stream Recycling: Cedar Park was one of the first communities in central Texas to offer residents single-stream recycling. We began providing this service in February 2010. This has been incredibly successful; our average monthly recycling has jumped from 98 tons (when residents used the small blue bin) of diverted waste to 252 tons (now that residents have access to the larger 90 gallon bin)! 
The easiest way to apply that force is to squeeze them together using tongue-and-groove pliers, such as Channellocks. You’ll need medium or large pliers to do this. Unlike prying on the lower ring with a screwdriver or hex wrench-the method recommended in most instruction sheets-squeezing can’t disturb the position of the sink flange and cause it to leak. Plus, it’s easier on the wrists.
At the time, the Mobro 4000 incident was widely cited by environmentalists and the media as emblematic of the solid-waste disposal crisis in the United States due to a shortage of landfill space: almost 3,000 municipal landfills had closed between 1982 and 1987.[5] It triggered much national public discussion about waste disposal, and may have been a factor in increased recycling rates in the late 1980s and after.[6] It was this that caused it to be included in an episode of Penn & Teller: Bullshit! (season 2, episode 5) in which they debunk many recycling myths.

There are two main types of garbage disposers—continuous feed and batch feed. Continuous feed models are used by feeding in waste after being started and are more common. Batch feed units are used by placing waste inside the unit before being started. These types of units are started by placing a specially designed cover over the opening. Some covers manipulate a mechanical switch while others allow magnets in the cover to align with magnets in the unit. Small slits in the cover allow water to flow through. Batch feed models are considered safer, since the top of the disposal is covered during operation, preventing foreign objects from falling in.

If the disposal is hit hard enough, it can actually move and shift so that it no longer sits right. The pipes can be moved; the seals can be pressed in an awkward position; or the retaining bolts can loosen. Make sure nothing has been knocked out of place. Then, check to see where the water is coming from and tighten up the bolts. If this does not fix the leak, then you will need to replace the putty or the sealing ring.


Manufacturers’ warranties for garbage disposals range from one year through the lifetime of the unit. One of the best warranties in the industry is the one offered by WasteKing on all of their garbage disposals. Should your disposal system fail due to material defect or mechanical effort during the purchaser’s lifetime, WasteKing will replace the unit for free. This is compliance to the policies provided for by their lifetime warranty.

Attach the pipes. You will attach a 90-degree disposal drainpipe to the disposal and the tailpiece to the other sink drain. There should be p-traps on both the disposal and the tailpiece from the other sink and they should be level to one another. Use straight pipes and a T-fitting to connect both drains into one line and route the drainpipes into the main drain.


If your garbage disposal is not running, first check to see if it is plugged in and receiving power. If so then check to see whether it will turn freely with your service wrench. Most disposers are sent with a self service wrench. The wrench is silver and should be located on or near your garbage disposal. (Check under your sink!) If it will not turn freely using the wrench, the disposal is most likely jammed. Check to see if the reset button has popped out.
A foul or foreign odor emanating from the garbage disposal that won’t go away no matter how thoroughly you have rinsed it, may also be a sign that it’s time to replace it. As the components in the grinding chamber wear out and the blades get duller and duller, food can easily get trapped inside and start to decompose. You may never have noticed the smell or have chosen to adapt and wait it out, but it may be a sign of a deeper problem. Visiting family members and dinner guests probably wouldn’t appreciate it very much, either.
Replacing a failed garbage disposer can seem daunting. There's the usual trepidation about electricity and water, the unfamiliar sink connection and enough drain fittings to make leaks a real possibility. Then there are the hassles of comparison shopping and the suspicion that the job could run into real money. And finally, failed disposers don't often leak, at least not in the beginning, so it's easy to put things off.
While inspecting your unit, if you see leaking, you will need to equip yourself with a screwdriver and tighten up the clamp that’s holding the garbage disposal to the dishwasher. The smaller drain line is attached by screws. Tighten up these screws and if the gasket is worn, replace this too (Careful not to overtighten). You should be able to purchase gaskets at your local home improvement store for a fairly inexpensive price.
Use a wet-dry vacuum cleaner to remove any smaller shards of glass. Simply hold the opening of the hose over the top of the garbage disposal and allow the vacuum to run until you can't hear anything be sucked up anymore. If the sink isn't particularly wet, you can use a regular vacuum, covering the end of the extension tube with a nylon stocking secured with a rubber band.

Your garbage disposer is not draining, has water leaks, creates weird noises, or has horrible odors? Troubleshoot your Faulty Disposer. If you are experiencing garbage disposal problems, you will find solutions on our checklist below to help you repair it. Before going out and spending a few hundred dollars on a new one, troubleshoot your existing sink garbage disposer to find the problem.
Sporting a powerful 2 800 RPM motor this Sporting a powerful 2 800 RPM motor this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal makes the grinding and draining of undesirable food waste a snap making use of jam-resistant dual stainless-steel swivel impellers to help get the job done while helping to prevent disposer clogs. EZ mount installation ensures quick ...  More + Product Details Close
A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.
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