With the garbage disposal shopping, I quickly learned that the big brands are Waste King and Sinkerator and that those were the two best places to start. After going over several models and two trips to two separate best buys (who, by the way, really need to amp up their customer service model) I cheated and had my mom choose one for me. Sue me. So she chose this particular brand, and wow—it works really well, I can’t believe how easy it makes my life. I can put bones, and tough food products down the disposal, and it makes cooking really simple. Go figure.
Consumer Reports is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to helping consumers. We make it easy to buy the right product from a variety of retailers. Clicking a retailer link will take you to that retailer’s website to shop. When you shop through retailer links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission – 100% of the fees we collect are used to support our mission. Learn more. Our service is unbiased: retailers can’t influence placement. All prices are subject to change.
FYI: I don't believe ISE is using the same quality metal causing these newer models to rust out quicker but, in my recent experience, I found that people who use their disposer properly will get at least 5 years service...that is acceptable for my purposes in the apartments. I did have 2 ISE disposers that only lasted about 2 years. One was from a tenant who almost never used it and allowed it to rust extensively and corrode from non-use. Using it helps keep it clean too. The second one, I determined was not being used properly, i.e., the tenant was not running water before turning on disposer causing food debris to accumulate in the small chamber below the blades/masticator.
Most garbage disposal manufacturers provide a range of models to choose from with ever-increasing power ratings. If you do a ton of cooking and use your disposal frequently, then spending a little extra on a 3/4 or 1 horsepower disposal will absolutely be worth the money. Not only do the more powerful units shred through food scraps much easier, but they can also handle harder objects such as bones or meat scraps that might jam a smaller, weaker disposal. As mentioned before, powerful disposals are less noisy and they tend to have only occasional damages. However, one downside of having larger, more powerful disposal is that they will require more space. No matter what your habits, likes, and dislikes are, it’s always best to consult with a John Moore tech before buying a new disposal to make sure it will fit under your sink and perform how you need it to.

Locate the circuit breaker that controls power to the garbage disposal, and flip it to the "off" position before continuing. Fix or replace the main seal if it is leaking. Remove both the drain pipe and the dishwasher hose, if applicable. Insert a screwdriver into the tightening ring and turn it counterclockwise. This will release the garbage disposal unit. Inspect the main seal that sits on the top of the unit. The seal is a large, soft rubber fitting that covers the top edge of the garbage disposal. If dirt, grit or food particles have fouled the main seal, wipe it down with a damp rag and reinstall the disposal unit. If the main seal is cracked, pitted or broken, it needs to be replaced. Once a new main seal has been inserted into the garbage disposal, push it up against the mounting bracket, insert a screwdriver into the tightening ring, and turn it clockwise to lock the unit into place. Reinstall the drain pipe and dishwasher hose, if applicable.

The size of the motor in the garbage disposal directly correlates to the units grinding ability. Garbage disposals typically have between 1/3-1 horsepower motors. Choose the correct horsepower based on the waste that you need to remove. 1/3 horsepower units will help tackle tasks like grinding vegetables easily, but more power is recommended if disposing a large quantity of food waste such as, vegetables and harder to grind meats.
IMPORTANT: Whenever you are working on your garbage disposal, inserting items, and/or inserting body parts into your garbage disposal unit, it should be UNPLUGGED and the POWER TO THE GARBAGE DISPOSAL UNIT SHOULD BE OFF!  Failing to do so will put you at risk of SERIOUS INJURY.  Also, if possible avoid placing your hands directly near the blades at the disposal.  If you can, instead use a tool to wedge out items or check the blades for blockage.
Garbage disposals first appeared in households in the 1930's and 1940's. These appliances, which are installed under a kitchen sink, can make a cook's life easier by trapping and shredding food waste items, allowing it to pass through the plumbing system. Although these popular appliances make cooking and cleaning much more convenient, they do require regular maintenance to keep them running at optimal performance. When it is time to replace your garbage disposal's blades, you can save time and money by doing it yourself.

The first official use of the word dates from 1735, when a royal decree authorised the establishment of eight gambling houses in Naples. The word is likely a blend, or portmanteau, of "capo" (boss) and a Neapolitan street game, the "morra".[3][5] (In this game, two persons wave their hands simultaneously, while a crowd of surrounding gamblers guess, in chorus, at the total number of fingers exposed by the principal players.)[6] This activity was prohibited by the local government, and some people started making the players pay for being "protected" against the passing police.[3][7][8]

If the garbage disposal won’t turn on, then it’s probably not getting power. First, make sure it’s plugged in. It’s easy to forget that disposals have wall outlets. It’s easy to knock a plug out of an outlet accidentally, especially in a dark place like under the sink. If the disposal is plugged in, check the reset button on the bottom of the disposal unit. If the disposal requires resetting, the button will be popped out. Simply press it and try the disposal again.
Has this ever happened to you? It’s the end of the day and you are dutifully washing your evening dishes.  Your sink isn’t draining quickly, so you flip on the switch of your waste disposer expecting to hear the satisfying sound of your meal remnants being ground into a pulp.  Instead – to your shock and dismay – the disposal only hums, or even worse, does nothing at all. Frustrating, right?
We apologize in advanced for stating the obvious, but… garbage disposals absolutely do not last forever! No matter how well it’s made or how much money you spend, any appliance that is exposed to thousands of gallons of running water, dish soap, scraps of food, bones, and the rare (we hope) spoon or lime wedge that accidentally gets dropped into the drain is going to wear out in due time. A unit that’s working well should be able to handle a few scraps of veggies or apple slices in a matter of a couple of seconds. If your garbage disposal seems to take forever to accomplish a simple grinding job, makes a strange noise or emits a nasty smell, it may be time to install a new one.
A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.

In most cases if your garbage disposal is humming it is because a foreign object is stuck in the disposal. If an item has been jammed in the blades of the disposal they will be unable to rotate. This can result in a humming noise. If this is the case simply unplug the disposal under the sink then survey the drain hole. If you discover that an object is stuck in the blades remove it. Once you have done this you can plug the disposal back in and flip the switch. This should clear up the problem.


Even the most trustworthy garbage disposal will develop a leak from time to time; however, just because your food waste disposer has developed a leak does not necessarily mean that it needs to be replaced. Doing a little bit of investigating and troubleshooting before deciding to run out and buy a new garbage disposal can mean the difference between spending $10.00 for a replacement and $100.00+ to replace the entire unit.


Physically remove lodged objects. If a large object has become lodged in your garbage disposal, you will need to remove it before proceeding with the cleaning process. First, it is important that you turn off the fuse that supplies power to the disposal unit. This is to ensure that it does not turn on during cleaning. Alternatively, you may be able to unplug it from under the sink, depending on the design.
STEP 3 – Clear out the disposal to remove any bits of hard foods, bone shards or other fibrous gunk that may be preventing the grinding blades from rotating and pulverizing your discarded food. Use a tool (a pliers, wooden spoon, etc.) to do this. Putting your hand in situation where whirling blades of destruction are nearby is never a good idea. (That is what I’ve heard anyway.)
To remove the gasket and replace it you will first have to disconnect the drain and unplug the cord to the garbage disposal. Also, if you have a dishwasher you will have to remove the dishwasher drain hose from the garbage disposal. With the drains and cord removed you can now take hold of the sides of the mounting nut and twist it counter clockwise to unlock the garbage disposal. The disposal should drop straight down.
Look for a jam. Something too tough to grind, such as a piece of glass, could be jamming the motor. Turn off the power and water, then unplug the disposal. (If it’s hardwired, turn off the breaker.) Remove the rubber baffle inside the drain-most just lift out-and shine a flashlight into the hole. Fish out the obstruction with a pair of tongs or needle-nose pliers.

You can reschedule or cancel your service at any time. To reschedule, simply go to Your Orders, find your service order and click on the ‘Contact Provider’ button on Your Orders page. To cancel, click on the 'Cancel Order' button on Your Orders page. Payment goes to the pro from your secure Amazon account. Because you aren't charged until the actual work is completed, cancelling a job doesn't require a refund.
As I have mentioned, garbage disposers for most people are just another kitchen appliance that we tend to take for granted, and this is one of the reasons I decided to bring this website to the internet. I have come across many customers over the years that only seem to notice this “gadget” when it goes wrong, and believe it or not, most of the time they go wrong is because they’re not cared for properly.
We hate to say it, but stoppages in garbage disposals are generally due to “operator error”. Either we have put too much in at one time or tried to force something through, smashing it with a spoon (there is that pesky spoon again!). Pasta, rice and salad are killers of garbage disposal drains and really need to be put down the drain in small amounts; if you put half a pot of rice in at the same time you definitely stand the change up plugging up the pipes under your sink.
If you’re like most people who cook, your kitchen probably looks like a disaster zone after preparing a meal for your family and eating it. The cleanup process is going to go much more quickly if you can stuff leftover food waste down the drain. Most garbage disposals have a switch located near the kitchen sink. All that you have to do is turn the faucet’s cold water on, flip the switch, and put the remaining leftovers in the drain.
Look for a jam. Something too tough to grind, such as a piece of glass, could be jamming the motor. Turn off the power and water, then unplug the disposal. (If it’s hardwired, turn off the breaker.) Remove the rubber baffle inside the drain-most just lift out-and shine a flashlight into the hole. Fish out the obstruction with a pair of tongs or needle-nose pliers.
The L-2600 garbage disposal unit is one of the brand’s best-sellers. Its glass-filled nylon grinding chamber allows a smoother and more quiet performance as opposed to a full stainless steel model. It’s also easy to install and doesn’t take up too much space. It even comes with a removable splash guard to keep all the food scraps down when disposing them.

Compared to the Sicilian Mafia's pyramidal structure, the Camorra has more of a 'horizontal' than a 'vertical' structure. As a result, individual Camorra clans act independently of each other, and are more prone to feuding among themselves. This however makes the Camorra more resilient when top leaders are arrested or killed, with new clans and organizations germinating out of the stumps of old ones. As the Galasso clan boss Pasquale Galasso once stated in court; "Campania can get worse because you could cut into a Camorra group, but another ten could emerge from it."[27]
Flush with water. Simply flushing out the garbage disposal with water will help to remove any loose dirt or grime. Stopper the garbage disposal, add a squirt of dish soap and run the hot water until there is 2 to 4 inches (5.1 to 10.2 cm) sitting in the sink. Pull out the plug and turn on the garbage disposal, allowing the water to flush through.[2]
STEP 1 – Many garbage disposals (a.k.a electric pigs) have a reset button located at the bottom of the unit that behaves likes a breaker switch or the reset button found on some electrical outlets. You may have to feel around for it if you can’t see it. While the disposal is off, press this button and then try to activate the disposal. If this works, skip the remaining steps and get back to doing your dishes! You solved the problem!
Some types of food remains are not easy to grind in a disposer. Do not put fibrous food items into your disposal. Help grind these items by putting in a few small bones or large ice cubes to the disposal. If the disposer won’t grind it up then turn off the disposer and remove the item with a pair of tongs. When using your disposer, make sure that the disposal is running with good water flow. Good water flow carries the waste down the drain line. Using too little water can create a clogged drain.
I believe if you always run your water first, turn on disposer, then discard food waste down disposer, you will get more longevity from your disposer and less likely have drain stoppage problems. It's also a good practice to run plenty of water (maybe even cleanser) after using the disposer to rinse out the small chamber between the blades and drain pipe. I've found that some disposer stoppages are caused by this chamber being clogged which also causes it to rust and deteriorate prematurely.
Save yourself a lot of hassle and go with the same brand & model. By doing so you'll avoid having to remount and mess with the drain & sink connections. Save the old power cord so you don't have to buy a new one. You'll need to do some very minimal wiring work to pull the wires from the terminals in the old disposal and attach them to the disposal. Make sure to attach the green grounding wire to avoid getting shocked when you switch on the disposal!
The MOEN GX PRO Series of garbage disposals The MOEN GX PRO Series of garbage disposals packs all the standard features and reliable performance into a sleek and compact form ideal for professionals and consumers alike. Installation is simplified with the Universal Xpress Mount which fits on all MOEN and most existing 3-bolt mounting assemblies. Eliminate everyday kitchen ...  More + Product Details Close
×