Should your disposal suddenly cease to work, check its overload protection. A red button on the bottom of the disposal trips when the disposal becomes jammed or overloaded to prevent damage and motor burnout. Unplug the disposal, push the button and remove the jam. Some high-end models can sense a jam and will automatically reverse the direction of the blades.
Hi, my name is Doug and the first thing I would like to do is thank you for stopping by my garbage disposal review website. We’re not the largest website on the internet, but that means you’re just going to come across information that’s straight to the point, and most importantly, honest! I have been the brunt of many jokes from family and friends who think I take garbage disposals just a little too seriously; however you’ve probably found my site because finding the right disposal is important to you too, and rightly so!
Garbage disposals are fairly straightforward machines. When something goes wrong with your garbage disposal, there are aren’t very many things you can do to troubleshoot your unit. This makes repairing your broken garbage disposal a relatively simple task. If your garbage disposal has broken, you can follow these tips to attempt to repair your unit.
The mounting bracket for your new garbage disposer assembles by inserting the fiber gasket, back-up flange and mounting ring over the sink flange, in that order. Be sure to hold these three pieces in place while you insert the snap ring over the flange. It’s called a snap ring because you’ll hear it snap in place. Then firmly tighten the three mounting screws against the backup flange, being careful to tighten them evenly.
Connect the connector pipe to the elbow and the adjacent sink. Use the connector pipe to connect the elbow piece to the T-fitting on the adjacent sink. The connector piece might need to be cut down to the correct length depending on your sink. Use the nuts and washers provided with your pipes to secure the pieces together using the tongue-and-groove pliers.[1]
Here are some problems that every garbage disposal can run into, old or new. Learning about your garbage disposal and how it works (and how it doesn’t work, of course!) is the first step to decide if it simply needs a repair or if it needs to be replaced all together. One thing that stands for any and all situations: never stick your hands down the drain!
There you have it. If you have questions about this or any other home improvement project, be sure to read our list of Frequently Asked Questions for this video. And be sure to print out our Project Instructions, which includes a Tools and Materials checklist, before visiting your local independent home improvement retailer. That’s where you’ll find all the products and helpful advice to complete your project. If you’re not sure where to find your local store, check out our Store Locator.
Most garbage disposal manufacturers provide a range of models to choose from with ever-increasing power ratings. If you do a ton of cooking and use your disposal frequently, then spending a little extra on a 3/4 or 1 horsepower disposal will absolutely be worth the money. Not only do the more powerful units shred through food scraps much easier, but they can also handle harder objects such as bones or meat scraps that might jam a smaller, weaker disposal. As mentioned before, powerful disposals are less noisy and they tend to have only occasional damages. However, one downside of having larger, more powerful disposal is that they will require more space. No matter what your habits, likes, and dislikes are, it’s always best to consult with a John Moore tech before buying a new disposal to make sure it will fit under your sink and perform how you need it to.

The metal sink flange that sits directly inside the sink drain is typically sealed around the top with plumber’s putty (a clay-like sealant) and then secured from under the sink with bolts. If the plumber’s putty deteriorates, or the bolts loosen, the flange can no longer form a watertight seal between the sink drain and the disposal—which could cause a leak at the top of the unit.

• Run water before and after you use the disposal If something has been put in the disposal that should not have been, use tongs or pliers to pull the material out. Never use your hand. To clean a garbage disposal of built-up sludge and debris, fill it with ice cubes and a cup of rock salt and then run it for about five seconds. If your garbage disposal smells bad, you can deodorize it by running warm water down it while you grind a quartered lemon.
Place the garbage disposal on a wide, clean work surface and locate the rubber gasket. The old gasket should be peeled off, and the new gasket should be mounted in the same spot. Take extra care to make sure that it sits flat and that it pops into the lip. Now you are ready to re-install your garbage disposal. Plug the cord back in reconnect each of the drains to make sure that there are no leaks.
I'm not what you'd call a handyman, although I've been working to get better at that. I will now at least try a home project before passing on it. So, when our 15-year garbage disposal died I had another opportunity. I determined our old unit to be a Badger 5 1/2 HP (this exact item). I didn't have time to wait for the item to arrive from Amazon so I went to Home Depot and coughed up an extra $20 for the Badger 500 - Home Depot's branded version of this item. They are identical except for the name & sticker.

In 2017, in Moscow and St. Petersburg, my research found a substantial increase in grassroots groups oriented around “civic pride” and local volunteer initiatives. These new groups focus on the preservation of green spaces, litter collection, recycling, urban beautification and historic preservation. These efforts represent a new “environmentalism of daily life” more acceptable to the government.
Manufactured in the United States, Waste King garbage disposals have won much praise for their energy efficient design. Waste King offers a wide range of garbage disposers for both residential and commercial settings. In the early 2000s, Waste King refocused their sights on providing unparalleled customer service and quality products, and their warranties are the current industry standard that others are measured by.

I'm not what you'd call a handyman, although I've been working to get better at that. I will now at least try a home project before passing on it. So, when our 15-year garbage disposal died I had another opportunity. I determined our old unit to be a Badger 5 1/2 HP (this exact item). I didn't have time to wait for the item to arrive from Amazon so I went to Home Depot and coughed up an extra $20 for the Badger 500 - Home Depot's branded version of this item. They are identical except for the name & sticker.
If the plumber’s putty has failed, you might be able to stop the leak by replacing the putty.  To do so without removing your garbage disposal, loosen the retaining bolts until a gap forms, force the new putty between the pipe and flange, and retighten the bolts to secure the putty into place.  If this does not work, then remove your disposal unit and reseal the flange.  To do this:

I have a Bosch condenser dryer that heats up and after 3-5 mins cuts out (no lights/power). After is cools a while, the machine can be restarted and runs a while longer until it shuts down again. This process repeats several times, with each progressive drying cycle being a little longer than the previous until the clothes are eventually dry.I've tested the the thermal-protector for continuity and the NTC-sensor on the heating element appears to be fine (tested for resistance). Could it be a faulty sensor/component on the control board that's getting too hot and cutting out the power? And if so, can it be easily identified/replaced, or would I need to replace the whole control board?Any help would be greatly appreciated!
This thing is exactly as everyone else has described. I, like many others, replaced an old ISE Badger with this unit, and it's heads and shoulders above in quality, function, quietness, etc. It grinds everything in seconds (as opposed to batting it around in the chamber for multiple cycles like the Badger). The original plumbing from the Badger lined right up and worked the first time. I'm very pleased with this item... although, there is one thing that I want to note; I read somewhere that if you use the EZ mount system that comes with it, you won't need plumber's putty - one can just use the gasket. This is true ONLY if using a flat lipped SS sink, and even then the rubber seal is optional as opposed to the putty (you can use only one, the putty or the seal with a SS sink, but not both). It's better said that you WILL need plumber's putty, and if you have a stainless steel sink, you have the option to use the thin rubber gasket (I'd use plumber's putty). Other than that minor detail (which made me take an unexpected run to our local hardware store), this unit is great. The one last thing I will say is around quietness. I've read some reviews that talk about how quiet or not quiet it is. I don't understand the desire to have an ultra-quiet garbage disposal. I mean, one needs to run water while the run the disposal, and a full-blast of the faucet going into a spinning basket creates a notable level of sound anyway, plus I want to be able to hear the load of the disposal so I can know when it's clear. This unit is by no means noisy, but I just don't see the desire to go ultra-quiet. Again, this big-boy Waste King is awesome.
We hate to say it, but stoppages in garbage disposals are generally due to “operator error”. Either we have put too much in at one time or tried to force something through, smashing it with a spoon (there is that pesky spoon again!). Pasta, rice and salad are killers of garbage disposal drains and really need to be put down the drain in small amounts; if you put half a pot of rice in at the same time you definitely stand the change up plugging up the pipes under your sink.
Flange: The flange is the uppermost portion of the garbage disposal, where the disposal and the sink drain meet. The flange can develop a leak for a variety of reasons. Check that all the mounting bolts, typically there are three, are tight enough. Snug the bolts up with a wrench if you see water dripping from any of the bolts, being careful not to overtighten the bolts.A second reason the flange may leak is if the seal, made of “plumber’s putty,” has failed. You will need to loosen the retaining bolts until you can see a gap around the flange. Force enough new putty in the gap, between the flange and the drain pipe, to fill in all the space. Tighten the retaining bolts.
Read the directions for your model before attempting a home repair. Most disposals have an electrical reset button, and a manual hex key for un-jamming. If the disposal stops working, its internal circuit breaker may have shut it off. Turn the switch definitely off, and try to pull out the hard object that may have jammed it. Then use the right-sized hex key to manually turn the rotor parts (usually directly under the unit in the center). If it turns, then push the reset button. It usually clicks in. Then, turn on the water and try the power, again.
How many years do garbage disposals last? One the average, quite a long time. In fact, with adequate care and proper maintenance, garbage disposal units can be of good service for about 8 to 15 years. This means the blades remain efficient and the motor has not burned out yet. This being said, neglecting garbage disposal leaks will significantly decrease this effective service life.

Horsepower Ratings – Even garbage disposals that have a basic ½ HP motor are more than capable of handling softer waste and bones; however, if your kitchen’s food waste routinely includes bones, cores, and harder vegetables, like carrots or avocados, then you need to look for a garbage disposal with a 1 HP (or higher) motor. A more powerful motor will be able to grind hard waste finer and faster, which reduces your chances of developing clogged pipes.
Disposers fasten to the sink drain fittings in a number of ways--some use threaded plastic nuts, others large hose clamps--but the mounting-ring assembly shown here is the most common. To remove the disposer, support it from below and rotate the large, 3-tab mounting ring at the top counterclockwise until the unit falls away. Remove the remainder of the drain assembly by loosening the three bolts and prying off the retaining ring. Push the drain out through the sink hole and clear away any old caulk or putty.
We hate to say it, but stoppages in garbage disposals are generally due to “operator error”. Either we have put too much in at one time or tried to force something through, smashing it with a spoon (there is that pesky spoon again!). Pasta, rice and salad are killers of garbage disposal drains and really need to be put down the drain in small amounts; if you put half a pot of rice in at the same time you definitely stand the change up plugging up the pipes under your sink.
After using the lowest cost disposers for over 20 years now, I find the newest models have not withstood regular use for more than 5 years. The older models had a blue housing where this next step-up model has a black housing which I am hoping for at least 5 years use. Our oldest (blue housing) disposers have lasted at least 5 years and some are now almost 20 years old.
The Camorra has proven to be an extremely difficult organization to fight within Italy. At the first mass trial against the Camorra in 1911–12, Captain Carlo Fabroni of the Carabinieri gave testimony on how complicated it was to successfully prosecute the Camorra: "The Camorrist has no political ideals. He exploits the elections and the elected for gain. The leaders distribute bands throughout the town, and they have recoursed to violence to obtain the vote of the electors for the candidates whom they have determined to support. Those who refuse to vote as instructed are beaten, slashed with knives, or kidnapped. All this is done with assurance of impunity, as the Camorrists will have the protection of successful politicians, who realize that they cannot be chosen to office without paying toll to the Camorra."[36]
To reseal the leaky flange, you must first detach the garbage disposal. Start by loosening the screws securing the main drain pipe to the disposal, then loosen the screws in the metal clamp securing the dishwasher hose to the disposal and detach the drain pipe and dishwasher hose from the disposal. Loosen the screws in the mounting ring that connects the disposal to the metal mounting assembly beneath the sink, then pull down the disposal and carefully set it on a clean, dry surface. Loosen the bolts in the mounting assembly with a wrench, then pull down the mounting assembly and set it near the disposal.

When something blocks your disposal unit’s flywheel, you will start hearing a low humming sound, and you know you’ve got a jam. Un-jamming a garbage disposal is something that depends on the specific unit you own. Every single one has a function to shut off when they are stuck to the point of stalling the motor. This is so the motor doesn’t burn out. However, they are also designed so that anyone (and we mean anyone!) can remove whatever it is that is blocking your unit. Underneath every unit is a small slot, and pretty much all of them come with a tiny little wrench to match it. These are most commonly called hex-head wrenches. Yes, that little tool that you probably have no idea where it could possibly be has a very specific and important purpose. Mind blown, right?
Inspect each of these locations while gliding a light-colored rag over the unit; the dyed water will readily show on the rag and reveal the location of the leak. If a leak isn’t immediately apparent, remove the sink stopper and pour a few more cups of dyed water down the sink drain, then check for leaks again. Leaks near the top of the unit are more likely to show themselves while the sink is plugged, while side and bottom leaks are more noticeable while the sink is unplugged.
Has a dual outlet to connect two appliances instead of one. You can connect your household waste disposal and a hot water dispenser (if you want). The power switches between the 2 outlets. When you press the switch to run the disposal, the water dispenser will be turn off. Once you press again to power off the disposer, the water dispenser will be turn on. Only one outlet is active at all times.
Despite the overwhelming magnitude of the problem, law enforcement officials continue their pursuit. The Italian police are coordinating their efforts with Europol at the European level as well as Interpol to conduct special operations against the Camorra. The Carabinieri and the Financial Police (Guardia di Finanza) are also fighting criminal activities related to tax evasion, border controls, and money laundering. Prefect Gennaro Monaco, Deputy Chief of Police and Chief of the Section of Criminal Police cites "impressive results" against the Camorra in recent years, yet the Camorra continues to grow in power.[42]

Trim the discharge tube as needed. If you’ve upgraded to a larger disposal or one of a different model, there’s a good chance that the discharge tube won’t be the right length to connect to the ground plumbing valve. Fortunately, this is a simple fix—mark the spot on the tube where it should line up with the drain pipe, then cut it to size with a hacksaw. It should be a perfect fit.[19]
Michele Zagaria, a senior member of the Casalesi clan, was arrested in 2011 after eluding police for 16 years. He was found in a secret bunker in the town Casapesenna, near Naples.[44] In 2014, clan boss Mario Riccio was arrested for drug trafficking in the Naples area. Around the same time 29 suspected Camorra members were also arrested in Rome.[45]
Our Minneapolis – St. Paul plumbers assist customers with garbage disposal installation by helping them choose between a continuous feed garbage disposal or a batch feed utility. Our plumbers will discuss the best options for your home and lifestyle. Some of the benefits of our garbage disposals include anti-jamming technology, plastic or metal blades, connectors to the dishwasher, system quietness, and more.
I think those are all the important items I wanted to share. The removal of the old one, cleaning the sink hole, and putting in the new box took about 35 minutes start to finish. I wasn't rushing but I was well prepared and had everything ready to go. Plumbers Putty was needed for install. Make sure you have that on hand. There was a thin rubber gasket that went under the flange (between the top flange and a stainless steel sink) that I didn't use because I didn't have a stainless steel sink. The one tricky thing I recall from the directions is that the same procedure is repeated twice in a couple of places - one for using the existing Badger mounting hardware and one for if you are using the EZ Mount system. If you are using the EZ Mount, make sure to SKIP the paragraph that is describing the work as it applies to the Badger mount. That's about it. I had to cut 3/4" off the black waste discharge pipe (90 degree elbow piece that screws into the new disposal) so that everything fit with my old plumbing. I loosened up all the slip joints on the old plumbing so I could wiggle things around as needed, aligned everything, and tightened the plumbing back up. New install was completed in well under 20 minutes after the removal and outlet installation.
After you install the new sink flange, you don’t want it shifting around when you’re assembling the parts underneath. Movement of the flange could break the seal between the flange and the sink, inviting a leak. Your best bet is to ask a helper to press down on the sink flange, or if you’re working alone, find something to weigh it down, such as the old disposal. Place an old towel under the weight so you don’t scratch the sink. If the bottom of your sink is quite concave, the old disposal might not contact the flange. In that case, place a can on the flange, then weigh down the can.

We have an annoying habit of letting the sink fill with dishes (I know *I* surely don't contribute to such, so it must be everyone else). Occasionally, the disposal backs up if you don't run it, so the sink begins to fill with water. When that happens, you can't see if there is any flatware in the bottom of the sink to get sucked down and chewed up. By sitting down in the drain, the Disposal Genie keeps that from happening, while letting you still run most of your scraps into the disposal.
STEP 1 – Many garbage disposals (a.k.a electric pigs) have a reset button located at the bottom of the unit that behaves likes a breaker switch or the reset button found on some electrical outlets. You may have to feel around for it if you can’t see it. While the disposal is off, press this button and then try to activate the disposal. If this works, skip the remaining steps and get back to doing your dishes! You solved the problem!
Proper use of a garbage disposal can stave off future leaks. So remember to grind only soft foods; hard items such as bones, apple cores, or raw potatoes can dislodge or damage the internal seals. Run cold water through the sink drain before and after food disposal to keep solid fats from congealing into gunk (which can deteriorate the sink flange and cause leaks). Finally, inspect your disposal for leaks—at least twice a year using the dyed-water test—to catch and repair minor leaks before they lead to water-damaged sink cabinets or kitchen floors.
Locate the leak. Wipe off the disposal unit with a dry rag. Run water into the unit and turn it on. There are four places where the disposal unit may leak. At the top main seal, at the drain pipe, at the optional dishwasher inlet or along the garbage disposal body. Notice where the water is coming from. If the unit is wet at the very top, the main seal is leaking. If the area beneath the drain pipe is wet, the gasket is leaking. If the hose from the dishwasher feed drips, the hose or clamp may be faulty. If water is running out the bottom of the unit but the inlets and outlet are dry, the unit itself has developed a leak and must be replaced.
If you're replacing a commercial garbage disposal, then you'll either want the Drain Strainer with Crown Adapter or the Drain Strainer XL. Both of these models have a universal Crown Adapter on top that serves as a funnel to cover the hole once the commercial garbage disposal has been removed. Note that it doesn't actually attach to the sink bowl, but you'll adjust the legs to get your unit flush underneath the bottom of the sink.
Garbage disposals help us get rid of food waste, so it’s not surprising that the appliance may be susceptible to gross smells. A capful of bleach or grinding up citrus peels can help eliminate any foul odors coming from your garbage disposal. However, if nothing seems to help your appliance in the smell department, it may be catching food particles within its crevices. We recommend disassembling your garbage disposal to clean it, or replacing it if it’s old.
Michele Zagaria, a senior member of the Casalesi clan, was arrested in 2011 after eluding police for 16 years. He was found in a secret bunker in the town Casapesenna, near Naples.[44] In 2014, clan boss Mario Riccio was arrested for drug trafficking in the Naples area. Around the same time 29 suspected Camorra members were also arrested in Rome.[45]

Run cold water while the disposal is on. Keep disposer and water running for 30 to 60 seconds AFTER the waste matter has cleared your drain. The waste still has a distance to go. Cold water keeps the motor, bearings and shredder assembly from overheating. It also lets the waste go down easier because the water is pushing it down. Don't use hot water, because it can melt fat and allow it to re-solidify as a blockage further down in the drain.
Like most appliances with moving parts, all kinds of stuff can go wrong in your disposal, for all sorts of reasons. Luckily, unlike many appliances, most disposals can be quickly and relatively easily fixed, as long as you’re careful and do your research. The next time you experience one of the following problems, follow these instructions and see if you can’t get things moving again.
One result is larger amounts of solid residue from the waste-water treatment process. According to a study at the East Bay Municipal Utility District’s wastewater treatment plant funded by the EPA, food waste produces three times the biogas as compared to municipal sewage sludge.[32] The value of the biogas produced from anaerobic digestion of food waste appears to exceed the cost of processing the food waste and disposing of the residual biosolids (based on a LAX Airport proposal to divert 8,000 tons/year of bulk food waste).[33]
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