This thing is exactly as everyone else has described. I, like many others, replaced an old ISE Badger with this unit, and it's heads and shoulders above in quality, function, quietness, etc. It grinds everything in seconds (as opposed to batting it around in the chamber for multiple cycles like the Badger). The original plumbing from the Badger lined right up and worked the first time. I'm very pleased with this item... although, there is one thing that I want to note; I read somewhere that if you use the EZ mount system that comes with it, you won't need plumber's putty - one can just use the gasket. This is true ONLY if using a flat lipped SS sink, and even then the rubber seal is optional as opposed to the putty (you can use only one, the putty or the seal with a SS sink, but not both). It's better said that you WILL need plumber's putty, and if you have a stainless steel sink, you have the option to use the thin rubber gasket (I'd use plumber's putty). Other than that minor detail (which made me take an unexpected run to our local hardware store), this unit is great. The one last thing I will say is around quietness. I've read some reviews that talk about how quiet or not quiet it is. I don't understand the desire to have an ultra-quiet garbage disposal. I mean, one needs to run water while the run the disposal, and a full-blast of the faucet going into a spinning basket creates a notable level of sound anyway, plus I want to be able to hear the load of the disposal so I can know when it's clear. This unit is by no means noisy, but I just don't see the desire to go ultra-quiet. Again, this big-boy Waste King is awesome.
The Camorra (Italian: [kaˈmɔrra]; Neapolitan: [kaˈmorrə]) is an Italian Mafia-type[2] crime syndicate, or secret society, which arose in the region of Campania and its capital Naples. It is one of the oldest and largest criminal organizations in Italy, dating back to the 17th century. Unlike the pyramidal structure of the Sicilian Mafia, the Camorra's organizational structure is more horizontal than vertical. Consequently, individual Camorra clans act independently of each other, and are more prone to feuding among themselves.
Has a dual outlet to connect two appliances instead of one. You can connect your household waste disposal and a hot water dispenser (if you want). The power switches between the 2 outlets. When you press the switch to run the disposal, the water dispenser will be turn off. Once you press again to power off the disposer, the water dispenser will be turn on. Only one outlet is active at all times.
To reseal the leaky flange, you must first detach the garbage disposal. Start by loosening the screws securing the main drain pipe to the disposal, then loosen the screws in the metal clamp securing the dishwasher hose to the disposal and detach the drain pipe and dishwasher hose from the disposal. Loosen the screws in the mounting ring that connects the disposal to the metal mounting assembly beneath the sink, then pull down the disposal and carefully set it on a clean, dry surface. Loosen the bolts in the mounting assembly with a wrench, then pull down the mounting assembly and set it near the disposal.
STEP 4 – If you must use your hands (again, not advised) to pull out all that funky goo, see STEP 2. The disposal must be powered off and unplugged. No exceptions. Not even on a double-dog dare. Also, make sure your hand will actually fit into the opening so that you can eventually remove your hand from the opening. You may need your hand later. If you think it is going to be a tight fit, I’d suggest that you not try it all. You’ve been warned.
Hold a noncontact voltage detector against the wall switch with the switch in the on position. The presence of electricity at the switch causes the detector to beep and flash. Leave the switch in the on position and hold the detector against the outlet beneath the sink. If the detector does not sense the presence of electricity at the outlet, the switch may have failed and electricity can no longer reach the disposal motor. Have the wall switch replaced.
I did all the things that you said. I finallyt called the home warrenty company. They said that there was a penny stuck and I had to get a new disposal. He took a pciture so I could see. I asked him why he didnt try to get the penny out and he said that he would just replace After he left, I put my hand in to see if I could get the penny lose. I could not see it so I put my hand in again and got all the food out and there was the penny. I then tried to get it to run and it is still humming. What should i do? Do I really need a new disposal?
After you install the new sink flange, you don’t want it shifting around when you’re assembling the parts underneath. Movement of the flange could break the seal between the flange and the sink, inviting a leak. Your best bet is to ask a helper to press down on the sink flange, or if you’re working alone, find something to weigh it down, such as the old disposal. Place an old towel under the weight so you don’t scratch the sink. If the bottom of your sink is quite concave, the old disposal might not contact the flange. In that case, place a can on the flange, then weigh down the can.

A sink flange is the uppermost portion of a garbage disposal.  It is the point where the sink, drain, and garbage disposal meet, and it keeps debris from clogging your drain.  If you have a leak at the uppermost area of your garbage disposal, the source is likely your garbage disposal flange.  The two most likely reasons for a flange leak are that the mounting bolts have loosened and that the plumber’s putty has failed.
If there is nothing visible clogging your disposal unit, the flip switch on your garbage disposal unit may have turned the unit off. This little red switch is located underneath your unit and protects against overheating and arcing situations. You can try pushing the red switch to reset the garbage disposal unit. Test your unit by turning it on. If it still won't turn on or makes a humming noise, unplug the unit or turn it off at the breaker box, and move to step 4.
InSinkErator garbage disposals provide a convenient and environmentally-conscious alternative to sending leftovers to landfills. Capable wastewater treatment plants can even recycle food scraps into energy and fertilizer. Plus, using garbage disposals can significantly reduce the amount of trash sent to landfills and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
After all this, if your garbage disposal still refuses to turn on, it’s likely just broken. The motor could be burned out or there could be another related problem. If that’s the case, now is the time to get a new unit. Contact a plumber for garbage disposal replacement. If you live in the Pittsburgh area, contact Terry’s Plumbing. We’ll be happy to come out to your home, diagnose the problem with your garbage disposal, and replace the unit if necessary. To find out more, call us today at (412) 364-9114.
The InSinkErator Badger 1 Continuous Feed Garbage Disposal 1/3 HP features a quick-mounting system that allows for easy installation or replacement. This sturdy garbage Disposal is constructed from galvanized steel and features a 26 oz. chamber for space-saving waste disposal. The garbage Disposal also features a 1/3 HP motor that rapidly grinds food waste for easy rinsing down the drain.
Hold a noncontact voltage detector against the wall switch with the switch in the on position. The presence of electricity at the switch causes the detector to beep and flash. Leave the switch in the on position and hold the detector against the outlet beneath the sink. If the detector does not sense the presence of electricity at the outlet, the switch may have failed and electricity can no longer reach the disposal motor. Have the wall switch replaced.
First, – and this may seem obvious, but- make sure the disposal is plugged in. With that said, let’s get to the bottom of this. If it is plugged in then press the reset button, which can be found on the bottom of the unit and is usually red. You should see the button popped out- press it. If that doesn’t work, make sure the circuit breaker hasn’t tripped and turned off in the electrical service panel. If the breaker has not tripped and the reset button is not popped out, then it could either be a damaged switch or a damaged unit all together. If the disposal will still not turn on and makes no noise, the garbage disposal is beyond repair and needs to be replaced. Unless you have a solid background as an electrician, we really don’t recommend you try replacing the switch yourself. Give us a call at John Moore Services first and make sure you take the proper, safe steps.
You can reschedule or cancel your service at any time. To reschedule, simply go to Your Orders, find your service order and click on the ‘Contact Provider’ button on Your Orders page. To cancel, click on the 'Cancel Order' button on Your Orders page. Payment goes to the pro from your secure Amazon account. Because you aren't charged until the actual work is completed, cancelling a job doesn't require a refund.

This part of the installation starts by removing the old mounting ring by loosening the mounting screws and then removing the snap ring, which holds the mounting assembly on the sink flange. You’ll need to use a flathead screwdriver to remove the snap ring. Next, remove the mounting ring by inserting the screwdriver into the tabs and turning the mounting ring assembly until it is free from the tabs. Be sure to support the bottom of the disposer as you do this. After this comes off, the entire mounting assembly will come free from the sink flange. Once free, pull the sink flange out from the top of the sink and scrape or wipe any old putty off the sink before wiping it clean with a towel.
One of the handiest appliances in your kitchen is probably something that you don’t think about very often, until it stops working. It’s your garbage disposer, and today I’m going to show you how to replace a garbage disposer under your kitchen sink. This project requires some moderate do-it-yourself skills, and it also requires turning off the electricity to the disposer at the electrical panel. But it’s really not that difficult, so let’s get started.
The company Waited hired has an “A plus” rating with the Better Business Bureau and has been in business for 14 years. They didn’t do anything wrong, so CBS4 is not naming them. They didn’t want to discuss the charges. They stand behind their billing, but they didn’t like having a customer who was unsatisfied. The company agreed to refund $400 to Waite.

Last, but not least, as your garbage disposal system begins to age, it grows susceptible to cracking along its interior lining. When this shell develops cracks, water will begin to appear at its seams. At times, the leak can be observed from the bottom of the unit, particularly from the reset button. If this is the cause of your garbage disposal’s leaks, then there is no method of repairing other than replacing the whole unit.
Last, but not least, as your garbage disposal system begins to age, it grows susceptible to cracking along its interior lining. When this shell develops cracks, water will begin to appear at its seams. At times, the leak can be observed from the bottom of the unit, particularly from the reset button. If this is the cause of your garbage disposal’s leaks, then there is no method of repairing other than replacing the whole unit.
STEP 5 – If you are one of those rebellious types that never listens to wise instruction, then take off any rings and make sure that your hand is lubricated with liquid dish soap or cooking oil to reduce the risk of it getting stuck in the drain opening. Also, have a phone nearby. If your hand does get stuck, you can then call someone (using your other hand, presumably) to call a friend or 911 for rescue. If at all possible, don’t call a friend with a video camera phone, because they’ll probably embarass you by broadcasting your plight on YouTube.

Hang the disposal by aligning the three mounting tabs with the slide-up ramps on the mounting ring. Holding the disposal in place, turn the lower mounting ring until all three tabs are locked into the mounting assembly. The disposal will now hang by itself. Tighten the three mounting screws, ultimately tightening each screw a few turns at a time until the mounting assembly is evenly and tightly seated against the bottom of the sink.
What's up with that scary loud noise when you turn it on? There are some reviews that make this sound like it is eating a spoon (a LOUD, disturbing, and/or startling snap or click noise, etc.). I have to say that was one of my biggest reservations when I ordered this thing, having read the reviews. A fairly large slice of reviewers commented negatively on it. Here's my take... The motor is 3/4 HP compared to my little dinky 1/3 HP motor on my old one. That is a lot more horsepower and, consequently, a lot more torque. The little "teeth" that do the waste grinding that sit in the base of the chamber spin freely. When you turn it on, the little grinders snap into place like how your head gets whipped back on one of those crazy spinning carnival rides. It's just from centrifugal force setting the blades into place. The fine print in the directions tell you that it is part of the anti-jam mechanism. It's not startling or even disconcerting to me or my wife. We didn't blink an eye. I couldn't scare my children by turning it on. It just makes a bit of a click when you turn it on. No biggie. Full disclosure here - ours is mounted to the bottom of a heavy, porcelain coated cast iron sink. Our sink may be better at handling the torque and may dampen the sound and vibration more than a thin stainless steel sink. Our sink weighs probably 75 pounds. A stainless steel sink weighs 7 pounds. A heavier sink can probably handle a garbage disposal operating under full load better than a flexible, lightweight sink. That's not why we got the sink but I think it's probably a benefit to damping sounds and vibrations.

Trim the discharge tube as needed. If you’ve upgraded to a larger disposal or one of a different model, there’s a good chance that the discharge tube won’t be the right length to connect to the ground plumbing valve. Fortunately, this is a simple fix—mark the spot on the tube where it should line up with the drain pipe, then cut it to size with a hacksaw. It should be a perfect fit.[19]

Throw some ice down once in a while. While ice will not sharpen the shredders (as is commonly believed) it does knock off any debris buildup on the sharp edges that keeps them from grinding food properly. For better results, make special ice cubes from pure lemon juice or vinegar, or alternate with biodegradable cleanser (label them in your freezer!) Cover and seal ice trays used in your freezer for cleanser, and do not reuse trays for food or drink after having been used for cleanser. While using the disposal, be sure to run cold water at the same time.


FYI: I don't believe ISE is using the same quality metal causing these newer models to rust out quicker but, in my recent experience, I found that people who use their disposer properly will get at least 5 years service...that is acceptable for my purposes in the apartments. I did have 2 ISE disposers that only lasted about 2 years. One was from a tenant who almost never used it and allowed it to rust extensively and corrode from non-use. Using it helps keep it clean too. The second one, I determined was not being used properly, i.e., the tenant was not running water before turning on disposer causing food debris to accumulate in the small chamber below the blades/masticator.
STEP 4 – If you must use your hands (again, not advised) to pull out all that funky goo, see STEP 2. The disposal must be powered off and unplugged. No exceptions. Not even on a double-dog dare. Also, make sure your hand will actually fit into the opening so that you can eventually remove your hand from the opening. You may need your hand later. If you think it is going to be a tight fit, I’d suggest that you not try it all. You’ve been warned.
A leaky garbage disposal is not only a hassle, it’s also a mess and can also result in other problems if left unfixed. If you’re inexperienced in home improvement work, diagnosing the source of the leak may seem like quite a challenge. Make your life easier with the help of the information below. Once you start eliminating each possible option on your checklist, you should be able to identify the problem quite quickly.

Connect the connector pipe to the elbow and the adjacent sink. Use the connector pipe to connect the elbow piece to the T-fitting on the adjacent sink. The connector piece might need to be cut down to the correct length depending on your sink. Use the nuts and washers provided with your pipes to secure the pieces together using the tongue-and-groove pliers.[1]
To be prepared, measure the distance from the outlet to the top of each disposal before you remove the old unit. If the new unit’s outlet is lower, you must also lower the tee that the discharge pipe connects to. Loosen the two nuts that connect the tee to the tailpiece above and the trap below. Try lowering the tee to see if the tailpiece is long enough. If it’s not, you’ll have to replace it with one that’s slightly longer.
There are two main types of garbage disposers—continuous feed and batch feed. Continuous feed models are used by feeding in waste after being started and are more common. Batch feed units are used by placing waste inside the unit before being started. These types of units are started by placing a specially designed cover over the opening. Some covers manipulate a mechanical switch while others allow magnets in the cover to align with magnets in the unit. Small slits in the cover allow water to flow through. Batch feed models are considered safer, since the top of the disposal is covered during operation, preventing foreign objects from falling in.
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