Update: As an aside, I also learned from my research that the best way to clean my disposal is to use citric acid. Having previously had no idea what citric acid was used for, I decided to order some from Amazon, going with the brand my sister uses: Citric Acid Powder - Ultra Fine Pure Powdered Crystals - Natural Preservative Food Grade Quality (16 oz) and gave it a whirl after 3 months of using my disposal. I let the citric acid sit with some water in the disposal for about ten minutes, and then I let it run for a solid 2 minutes. I repeated the procedure a few times and after about 30 minutes—wow, all the leftover gunk and food was flushed out of the disposal, leaving it clean with a very mild citrus scent. I feel like I’m becoming a real DIY at home kind of guy.

For any major issues with the garbage disposal, you should leave the job to a professional plumber only. Reaching your hand into the drain is dangerous, even if you believe the power is shut off. A plumber can help you evaluate the state of your disposal, and decide whether or not you need a new unit. Upgrading to a faster disposal unit with a higher horsepower can help to protect your pipes and make cleaning up after meals even easier.
Physically remove lodged objects. If a large object has become lodged in your garbage disposal, you will need to remove it before proceeding with the cleaning process. First, it is important that you turn off the fuse that supplies power to the disposal unit. This is to ensure that it does not turn on during cleaning. Alternatively, you may be able to unplug it from under the sink, depending on the design.
If the garbage disposal won't turn on but the motor makes a humming sound when you flip the switch, it indicates that the inner flywheel is jammed. Usually, this causes the appliance's reset button to pop or the circuit breaker to trip very quickly. This is not a situation you want to continue for very long, as it can burn out the disposer's motor unless the reset button or circuit breaker shuts things off. 
Another method for cleaning and deodorizing your disposal unit is to sprinkle some baking soda in your unit and rinse it with about a cup of vinegar. This will create the bubbling “volcano effect” that kids love to watch so invite them in on this cleaning project. After allowing your mixture to sit for about 5 minutes, run hot water down the disposal until everything is thoroughly rinsed.
When something blocks your disposal unit’s flywheel, you will start hearing a low humming sound, and you know you’ve got a jam. Un-jamming a garbage disposal is something that depends on the specific unit you own. Every single one has a function to shut off when they are stuck to the point of stalling the motor. This is so the motor doesn’t burn out. However, they are also designed so that anyone (and we mean anyone!) can remove whatever it is that is blocking your unit. Underneath every unit is a small slot, and pretty much all of them come with a tiny little wrench to match it. These are most commonly called hex-head wrenches. Yes, that little tool that you probably have no idea where it could possibly be has a very specific and important purpose. Mind blown, right?
You can buy a 1/3-hp disposal for $80 or less, but our experts suggest that a more expensive unit with at least 3/4 hp would be a better choice. The more powerful the motor, the less chance it will jam. In addition, higher-priced disposals are generally quieter and have longer warranties. If you need to replace the splash guard guard as part of your garbage disposal installation, take a look at this guide.
First, – and this may seem obvious, but- make sure the disposal is plugged in. With that said, let’s get to the bottom of this. If it is plugged in then press the reset button, which can be found on the bottom of the unit and is usually red. You should see the button popped out- press it. If that doesn’t work, make sure the circuit breaker hasn’t tripped and turned off in the electrical service panel. If the breaker has not tripped and the reset button is not popped out, then it could either be a damaged switch or a damaged unit all together. If the disposal will still not turn on and makes no noise, the garbage disposal is beyond repair and needs to be replaced. Unless you have a solid background as an electrician, we really don’t recommend you try replacing the switch yourself. Give us a call at John Moore Services first and make sure you take the proper, safe steps.
Warranty - The average industry warranty on a garbage disposal is one year; however, it is not uncommon to see manufacturers’ warranties that can extend up to ten years. As a general rule of thumb, the more comprehensive and longer a warranty is, the more confidence the manufacturer has in the product they have made, but this is not always the case, so it is still important to do your homework.
Once you have a garbage disposer installed, maintenance is what keeps your unit going. By following this link, you will find a very easy to follow video which details some simple steps to help keep your disposal unit clean, and your kitchen free of bad smells and harmful bacteria. You see, my website isn’t just about telling you to buy this model or that right now or you’ll miss out on some good deals (although I have mentioned a couple of places you can take a look at if you’re interested), it’s about making sure you get the best from your garbage disposer.
Next, you’ll connect the wires that you disconnected from the old disposer, to the new disposer. If this isn’t a replacement project, and you’re adding a new disposer where you didn’t have one before, you’ll first need to call an electrician to run the proper wires and a wall switch to the unit. For our project, the electrical wires and switch were already in place.
Not every garbage disposal was created equal, and it can be difficult to discern which one is right for your home. After all, a quick internet search will show you that there are hundreds of different models to choose from. You shouldn’t automatically choose the cheapest or best rated garbage disposal. You need to find the one that is right for your unique needs.
I bought this two years ago when planning a kitchen remodel for our retirement home. Since I was doing the remodel myself, it took two years, working part time. During that period I managed to lose the instructions for this air switch. Thank you for providing them. Now I can install it on the front of my Ikea kitchen sink cabinet. When/if I ever am in a wheelchair or walker, I will still be able to easily reach the disposal switch. WARNING: If you have a toddler, mount this where they can't easily reach it and send a matchbox car down your sink disposal in an imaginary carwash.

As advertised, it does come with a corded plug so it will need an outlet. My old Badger was a direct wire. Some folks tore out the cord and the strain relief as a fix and hard wired it like their old one. Some folks put an outlet in, which I found that to be a 15 minute job. I didn't want to mess around with chopping out the stock cord and putting in a new one and messing with the strain relief replacement. I thought the new outlet process was much easier because, heck, the wire's already there and that's always the hardest part of wiring a box! I shoved some of the extra length of the existing wire back into the hole in the wall that it came out from. I thought carefully about where the new box should go so the body of the disposal didn't hit it. I screwed it to the back of the cabinet, poked the wires into the box, screwed them to a new receptacle and, voila!. NOTE: IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING WITH ELECTRICAL WIRING, DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS YOURSELF. If you do, be sure to kill the power at the circuit breaker and it is probably the easiest box you will install. Just make sure it is securely mounted into something besides the flimsy back panel of the cabinet.

After all this, if your garbage disposal still refuses to turn on, it’s likely just broken. The motor could be burned out or there could be another related problem. If that’s the case, now is the time to get a new unit. Contact a plumber for garbage disposal replacement. If you live in the Pittsburgh area, contact Terry’s Plumbing. We’ll be happy to come out to your home, diagnose the problem with your garbage disposal, and replace the unit if necessary. To find out more, call us today at (412) 364-9114.
Garbage disposals are considered nearly essential for modern kitchens. Installed underneath the sink, they grind up food into particles that will easily flush down a drain. A common problem with garbage disposals is that they will become jammed if too much food is pushed into them or a foreign object falls inside. When jammed, the circuit breaker may trip, cutting the power to the unit. When that happens, it will appear that the garbage disposal motor has burned out even though that may not be the case.
Locate the leak. Wipe off the disposal unit with a dry rag. Run water into the unit and turn it on. There are four places where the disposal unit may leak. At the top main seal, at the drain pipe, at the optional dishwasher inlet or along the garbage disposal body. Notice where the water is coming from. If the unit is wet at the very top, the main seal is leaking. If the area beneath the drain pipe is wet, the gasket is leaking. If the hose from the dishwasher feed drips, the hose or clamp may be faulty. If water is running out the bottom of the unit but the inlets and outlet are dry, the unit itself has developed a leak and must be replaced.
Using a garbage disposal is the swift and environmentally easy alternative to removing food waste from your kitchen. A garbage disposal is made to efficiently eliminate leftover food waste by grinding remains into fine particles that are easily flushed away. When shopping, look for a few key features before purchasing a garbage disposal, such as what type you will need? How much horsepower do you want? Are there any special features that you require? We also recommend to check if your waste goes to a septic tank, as this can determine the specific type you will need.

A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 A 2-level pre-cutter joins forces with the 2 800 RPM motor-powered dual stainless-steel swivel impellers within this GE 1/2 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal to make the grinding and draining of undesirable food waste a snap. A manual reset overload protector helps safeguard the disposer from damage ensuring operational longevity. With ...  More + Product Details Close
The good news is that a leaking gasket can be easily replaced. Most home improvement or local hardware stores will carry them, and they are usually inexpensive. However, depending on the particular model of your garbage disposal, it may require a specially fitted rubber gasket. To ensure that you get the right gasket the first time, write down your garbage disposal’s model number, take it to the store, and ask an employee to match it up for you.
For any major issues with the garbage disposal, you should leave the job to a professional plumber only. Reaching your hand into the drain is dangerous, even if you believe the power is shut off. A plumber can help you evaluate the state of your disposal, and decide whether or not you need a new unit. Upgrading to a faster disposal unit with a higher horsepower can help to protect your pipes and make cleaning up after meals even easier.
Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.
Connect the new mounting assembly. Working in reverse order now, slide a rubber gasket over the bottom of the new sink flange, followed by a second metal flange. Position the new mounting ring last and insert screws into each of the open screw holes. Hold the assembly in place with one hand while you tighten the screws up against the lower flange with the other.[14]
Many localities in the United States prohibited the use of disposers.[8] For many years, garbage disposers were illegal in New York City because of a perceived threat of damage to the city's sewer system. After a 21-month study with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection,[9] the ban was rescinded in 1997 by local law 1997/071, which amended section 24-518.1, NYC Administrative Code.[10]
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