The InSinkErator Badger 5 1/2 HP Continuous Feed Garbage Disposal features a quick-mounting system that allows for easy installation or replacement of most disposers. This garbage disposal also features a 1/2 HP motor that rapidly grinds food waste for easy rinsing down the drain. The garbage Disposal also features galvanized steel construction for durability.
If the disposal is hit hard enough, it can actually move and shift so that it no longer sits right. The pipes can be moved; the seals can be pressed in an awkward position; or the retaining bolts can loosen. Make sure nothing has been knocked out of place. Then, check to see where the water is coming from and tighten up the bolts. If this does not fix the leak, then you will need to replace the putty or the sealing ring.

This thing is exactly as everyone else has described. I, like many others, replaced an old ISE Badger with this unit, and it's heads and shoulders above in quality, function, quietness, etc. It grinds everything in seconds (as opposed to batting it around in the chamber for multiple cycles like the Badger). The original plumbing from the Badger lined right up and worked the first time. I'm very pleased with this item... although, there is one thing that I want to note; I read somewhere that if you use the EZ mount system that comes with it, you won't need plumber's putty - one can just use the gasket. This is true ONLY if using a flat lipped SS sink, and even then the rubber seal is optional as opposed to the putty (you can use only one, the putty or the seal with a SS sink, but not both). It's better said that you WILL need plumber's putty, and if you have a stainless steel sink, you have the option to use the thin rubber gasket (I'd use plumber's putty). Other than that minor detail (which made me take an unexpected run to our local hardware store), this unit is great. The one last thing I will say is around quietness. I've read some reviews that talk about how quiet or not quiet it is. I don't understand the desire to have an ultra-quiet garbage disposal. I mean, one needs to run water while the run the disposal, and a full-blast of the faucet going into a spinning basket creates a notable level of sound anyway, plus I want to be able to hear the load of the disposal so I can know when it's clear. This unit is by no means noisy, but I just don't see the desire to go ultra-quiet. Again, this big-boy Waste King is awesome.
Modern garbage disposal units connect to dishwasher drainpipes.  This enables dishwashers to expel leftover food scraps and residue that would otherwise accumulate in the dishwasher unit.  A common source of leaks is the area where your dishwasher and garbage disposal connect.  These leaks most often occur when the hose’s clamp is not secure enough and when the dishwasher hose cracks.  To fix this issue, simply replace the cracked section of the hose or tighten the clamp.
First, – and this may seem obvious, but- make sure the disposal is plugged in. With that said, let’s get to the bottom of this. If it is plugged in then press the reset button, which can be found on the bottom of the unit and is usually red. You should see the button popped out- press it. If that doesn’t work, make sure the circuit breaker hasn’t tripped and turned off in the electrical service panel. If the breaker has not tripped and the reset button is not popped out, then it could either be a damaged switch or a damaged unit all together. If the disposal will still not turn on and makes no noise, the garbage disposal is beyond repair and needs to be replaced. Unless you have a solid background as an electrician, we really don’t recommend you try replacing the switch yourself. Give us a call at John Moore Services first and make sure you take the proper, safe steps.
We have an annoying habit of letting the sink fill with dishes (I know *I* surely don't contribute to such, so it must be everyone else). Occasionally, the disposal backs up if you don't run it, so the sink begins to fill with water. When that happens, you can't see if there is any flatware in the bottom of the sink to get sucked down and chewed up. By sitting down in the drain, the Disposal Genie keeps that from happening, while letting you still run most of your scraps into the disposal.
The size of the motor in the garbage disposal directly correlates to the units grinding ability. Garbage disposals typically have between 1/3-1 horsepower motors. Choose the correct horsepower based on the waste that you need to remove. 1/3 horsepower units will help tackle tasks like grinding vegetables easily, but more power is recommended if disposing a large quantity of food waste such as, vegetables and harder to grind meats.
A. First, troubleshoot a bit. You can stick something down the drain (not your fingers) to try and dislodge whatever may be causing the blockage. You can also try using a shop vac to unblock the drain. If these options don’t work, cut the electricity connection to your device before you go inside to try and remove anything that’s stuck. If you still can’t find the culprit, call a professional. Your unit may be damaged.
Rotate the disposer to align the disposer with the drain or the discharge tube, slide the flange over drain pipe or discharge tube and insert the gasket into the discharge outlet. Then screw in the bolts that secure the flange to the disposer. Reconnect all the plumbing connections as well as the dishwasher inlet hose. Then turn the power back on at the electrical supply panel and test the unit for leaks, making sure to run cold water while the unit is running.

InSinkErator is a brand name that is well-known for their design and manufacturing of waste disposal systems and instant hot water dispensers. John Hammes founded the company in 1927 in Racine, Wisconsin, where their headquarters remain today. Hammes is credited with designing and producing the first “in sink” waste disposal system, and the InSinkErator is a play on the word “incinerator”. Currently, InSinkErator produces and markets garbage disposal systems under the Evolution and Badger Series brand names.
Why am I writing a review about my beloved garbage disposal? Why am I referring to it as my "beloved" garbage disposal? I replaced a different garbage disposal from Costco; it had lasted a few years before giving up the ghost (the metal teeth within had basically corroded and broken off). Even before it met its untimely end, it had been loud and took a long time to grind things up--despite it being 1-1/4 horsepower!
Attach the pipes. You will attach a 90-degree disposal drainpipe to the disposal and the tailpiece to the other sink drain. There should be p-traps on both the disposal and the tailpiece from the other sink and they should be level to one another. Use straight pipes and a T-fitting to connect both drains into one line and route the drainpipes into the main drain.

4. Is installing a garbage disposal worth the additional water expense? On average, a modern faucet runs 2.5 gallons of water per minute, or 900 gallons per year based upon the average annual household usage in the U.S. Depending on how often you use your disposerl, your home’s water usage, and water bill, will rise. This is one factor you’ll need to consider before deciding whether or not to buy a garbage disposal.

My old built in guard got destroyed over the years. Rather than remove the whole disposal I ordered this, hoping it would solve the problem of the noise and the water and food particles that would fly out of the disposal onto my slightly hairy chest and face. This solved both problems. It is so quiet that it is like white noise. Such a calming sound that you can sleep to it.
Disposers range between $45 and $250, and most hold up fairly well under normal use. It's common for a $50, 1/3-hp disposer with a 1-year warranty to last 10 to 12 years. So what does more money buy? Increased longevity, longer warranties, more power and less aggravation. The better units have stainless steel components, auto-reversing starts and bigger motors. Units that reverse direction with each start greatly reduce stoppages, while larger motors can chew through larger and more varied food loads.
One of the handiest appliances in your kitchen is probably something that you don’t think about very often, until it stops working. It’s your garbage disposer, and today I’m going to show you how to replace a garbage disposer under your kitchen sink. This project requires some moderate do-it-yourself skills, and it also requires turning off the electricity to the disposer at the electrical panel. But it’s really not that difficult, so let’s get started.

Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person.

Garbage Disposal Repair

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