In the event that you do not have a grounded outlet to power the garbage disposal, you will need to install one. Adding a grounded outlet may cost as little as $5 when existing electrical wiring is placed a short distance away, plus an additional $75 for the electrician's labor. If a new grounded outlet needs to be added and electrical wiring does not yet exist, it will likely cost around $90, depending on labor and parts. If your project requires the addition of a new switch and wire, plan to spend an average of $5 to $10 on materials, plus about 30 minutes of labor at an average cost of $75 an hour.
Determine whether there's an Allen-wrench port at the bottom of the disposal, which is located under the sink. If there is, insert an Allen-wrench into the port and turn it back and forth to move the masher plate and dislodge the glass. If you can't find an Allen-wrench port, insert the handle of a broom or a hammer into the top of the garbage disposal and wiggle it around to try to dislodge the glass.
Garbage disposals are considered nearly essential for modern kitchens. Installed underneath the sink, they grind up food into particles that will easily flush down a drain. A common problem with garbage disposals is that they will become jammed if too much food is pushed into them or a foreign object falls inside. When jammed, the circuit breaker may trip, cutting the power to the unit. When that happens, it will appear that the garbage disposal motor has burned out even though that may not be the case.
We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
Locate the circuit breaker that controls power to the garbage disposal, and flip it to the "off" position before continuing. Fix or replace the main seal if it is leaking. Remove both the drain pipe and the dishwasher hose, if applicable. Insert a screwdriver into the tightening ring and turn it counterclockwise. This will release the garbage disposal unit. Inspect the main seal that sits on the top of the unit. The seal is a large, soft rubber fitting that covers the top edge of the garbage disposal. If dirt, grit or food particles have fouled the main seal, wipe it down with a damp rag and reinstall the disposal unit. If the main seal is cracked, pitted or broken, it needs to be replaced. Once a new main seal has been inserted into the garbage disposal, push it up against the mounting bracket, insert a screwdriver into the tightening ring, and turn it clockwise to lock the unit into place. Reinstall the drain pipe and dishwasher hose, if applicable.

If your garbage disposal is making a clicking or rattling sound, there may be some food particles that will not grind up inside. Remove power from disposer, reach into the sink hole with a pair of tongs and remove anything that is still down in the disposer. Test your disposer to be sure the noise is gone. If not continue troubleshooting your disposer issue (see below).

Garbage Disposal Replacement

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