If the disposal’s still leaking, loosen the mounting bolts and push the sink flange up until it’s slightly higher than the surface of the sink. Apply fresh plumber’s putty to the threshold between the flange and the sink. When you’ve applied enough, re-attach the unit by putting the bolts back and tightening. Wipe away excess putty that squeezed out. Finish re-installing by replacing the disposal unit on the mount. Turn the disposal back on and look for leaks.

Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.

Garbage Disposal Installation


If the disposal jams, turn off the power and look underneath the sink. There is a place in the center of the motor shaft, on the bottom of the unit, where you can use an allen wrench to manually turn the motor. Give the motor a few manual turns to get it unstuck. Remove the Allen wrench before you try to run the motor again. Also, press the reset button/ circuit breaker on the bottom of unit, if applicable.
Physically remove lodged objects. If a large object has become lodged in your garbage disposal, you will need to remove it before proceeding with the cleaning process. First, it is important that you turn off the fuse that supplies power to the disposal unit. This is to ensure that it does not turn on during cleaning. Alternatively, you may be able to unplug it from under the sink, depending on the design.

If the disposal’s still leaking, loosen the mounting bolts and push the sink flange up until it’s slightly higher than the surface of the sink. Apply fresh plumber’s putty to the threshold between the flange and the sink. When you’ve applied enough, re-attach the unit by putting the bolts back and tightening. Wipe away excess putty that squeezed out. Finish re-installing by replacing the disposal unit on the mount. Turn the disposal back on and look for leaks.
To be prepared, measure the distance from the outlet to the top of each disposal before you remove the old unit. If the new unit’s outlet is lower, you must also lower the tee that the discharge pipe connects to. Loosen the two nuts that connect the tee to the tailpiece above and the trap below. Try lowering the tee to see if the tailpiece is long enough. If it’s not, you’ll have to replace it with one that’s slightly longer.

The mounting bracket for your new garbage disposer assembles by inserting the fiber gasket, back-up flange and mounting ring over the sink flange, in that order. Be sure to hold these three pieces in place while you insert the snap ring over the flange. It’s called a snap ring because you’ll hear it snap in place. Then firmly tighten the three mounting screws against the backup flange, being careful to tighten them evenly.


An affordable option that offers outstanding value, the Waste King Legend Series comes backed by a solid five-year warranty. The stainless steel disposal is compact enough to install under most sinks. The continuous feed design means this disposal requires just a flip of a switch. It runs very quietly, but it is still powerful enough to grind food waste efficiently.
Don’t you wish good things could last forever? You’ve been there. We have, too. But the reality is that things don’t usually go the way we plan. When you least expect it, life throws a curve ball your way. The way kitchen appliances work is no different, and that especially means the ones we use every day. Garbage disposals are an essential kitchen convenience for most homeowners that are used pretty much every day. Prepping food and cooking becomes much easier when peels and other scraps can just be tossed into the sink and straight down the drain, but over time, all that will take its toll.
There are two main types of garbage disposers—continuous feed and batch feed. Continuous feed models are used by feeding in waste after being started and are more common. Batch feed units are used by placing waste inside the unit before being started. These types of units are started by placing a specially designed cover over the opening. Some covers manipulate a mechanical switch while others allow magnets in the cover to align with magnets in the unit. Small slits in the cover allow water to flow through. Batch feed models are considered safer, since the top of the disposal is covered during operation, preventing foreign objects from falling in.
Personally I'd recommend if you have a disposal have it removed. Most people don't realize, there is very little you are supposed to put in them. Whereas, they are the primary reason for your kitchen sink drain getting clogged. Just use the trash, it could save you an expensive Drain cleaning bill. Here's a tip for y'all who do have them. After use let warm water run while it's still running for 3 to 4 minutes, that will help push everything to the bigger main drain .
Thanks so much! Clear, easy to follow instructions. We were able to follow step by step and got it done. I read somewhere that they used a car jack to hold the disposal when taking it off and putting it on. That was a really helpful tip for anyone else doing this. They’re fairly heavy. Also, it leaked when the gasket was just placed in the hole. We actually had to take it apart and put the gasket over the plastic pipe, then when you tighten the metal plate to connect it to the disposal, that sealed it. Anyway, thanks again. Being able to do this on our own saved us quite a bit of time and hassle.

But to dislodge whatever’s causing it to be in a bind you can use the hex wrench that came with the garbage disposal. I know most people lose them, that’s okay. Grab your set of Allen wrenches, get the right size, insert it into the recess hole right in the bottom of the disposal, and turn it left and right until you dislodge whatever caused it to get into a bind.
Some folks knocked the instructions. Take heart. It appears that the Waste King guys have heard the criticisms from the negative reviewers. I am guessing that they have been re-written to better explain the installation because they are really easy to follow. My best advice is this: don't be afraid of a difficult or confounding set of installation instructions. It is really easy. Here's what you do. Go to youtube.com and search for a video on How To Remove Your Existing Garbage Disposal because this is the hardest part. You will find one that matches yours. Watch it. I started removing the Badger incorrectly, stopped, watched a video, and then it was a piece of cake. In my case, I shouldn't have removed the three long screws before removing the body of the old one. You do it after it is disconnected. READ the instruction manual carefully. Then go ahead and youtube the Waste King installation video. It is very easy once you see it done. No filing or grinding gaskets, and Good Lord, no car jacks under your sink please. If it is hard then you are doing something wrong. STOP!!! Review the procedure. Start again. The directions are actually very explicit. The parts are well labeled. The diagrams show you what to do. The videos show you what to do. If you prepare yourself (15 minutes of reading and watching videos, tops) you will fly though the installation and be a happy person.
Make sure that there is power getting to the unit. Garbage disposals have an independent cord that is plugged into a wall socket beneath the sink. Unplug the disposal unit and plug another small appliance, like a desk fan, into the wall socket. Turn the appliance on to see if it works. If it doesn't work, check the breaker panel. If the breaker is flipped to the "On" position, there is an electrical problem on that circuit, and an electrician must be called in.
Garbage disposals can range from $70 on the low end to $380 on the high end -- and generally speaking, you get what you pay for. A less expensive unit is likely to produce more noise, require more water, and clog more easily than a higher-end model. Likewise, a more expensive unit will be faster, quieter and less likely to malfunction than a lower end model -- and it will be lighter-weight and offer greater capacity as well. The average cost of a garbage disposal installation with a one-year manufacturer’'s warranty is $185. The average amount of time taken to install a garbage disposal, including cleanup, is three hours. The hourly cost for labor will range from $20 to $40 -- $28 on average.
An affordable option that offers outstanding value, the Waste King Legend Series comes backed by a solid five-year warranty. The stainless steel disposal is compact enough to install under most sinks. The continuous feed design means this disposal requires just a flip of a switch. It runs very quietly, but it is still powerful enough to grind food waste efficiently.
Whether you repaired or replaced the leaking garbage disposal, test for any missed problem spots. Wipe the unit dry with a clean cloth, then unplug the sink drain (if plugged) and pour a few cups of dyed water into the drain once more. Use a flashlight to inspect the entire unit. If you don’t observe a leak, turn on the power to the disposal from your breaker box and plug in the disposal at the wall outlet.
Loosen the nut securing the rest of the assembly. Just below the sink flange where the drain empties into the garbage disposal you’ll see a circular plastic piece similar in appearance to the mounting ring. Insert the tip of a screwdriver into one of the lugs on this piece and rotate it in a counterclockwise direction. Pull the nut away and set it aside.[9]
Assuming that you have already given the disposal the time it needs to run and clear the garbage, you probably have a congested drain line. We don’t recommend using chemical drain cleaners with a garbage disposal. You will very likely just damage the unit and end up with a sink full of toxic chemicals that you’ll eventually be forced to clean out manually. If the blockage doesn’t go down with the good ol’ baking soda and vinegar remedy, then calling a John Moore professional is your best bet. He or she will know exactly how to properly remove the bolts, disconnect the drain trap and remove the trap and the discharge drain pipe, check for clogs and any other obstructions, and finally clear the blockage with the latest and best tools. (See our previous post about good steps you can take when your kitchen sink is clogged!)
"Thank you for creating a product that will help reduce the need to call a plumber every 2-3 weeks. I have tried various options to get my staff to take better care of what goes down the 3 compartment sink drain but it did not work. The Drain Strainer makes it extremely simple for them. The first two XL's that I ordered have worked perfectly. These additional two I ordered are for a different location and we expect the same results there." Jim Abanto - Owner El Chalan Restaurant - Miami FL
Jump up ^ "Sub-committee onpo East-West Economic Co-operation and Convergence and Sub-committee on Civilian Security and Co-operation Trip Report: Visit to Rome / Palermo Secretariat Report 6–8 May 1998 (Prefect Gennaro Monaco, Deputy-Chief of Police and Chief of the Section of Criminal Police)". NATO Parliamentary Assembly. August 18, 1998. Retrieved 2009-01-24.

Flange: The flange is the uppermost portion of the garbage disposal, where the disposal and the sink drain meet. The flange can develop a leak for a variety of reasons. Check that all the mounting bolts, typically there are three, are tight enough. Snug the bolts up with a wrench if you see water dripping from any of the bolts, being careful not to overtighten the bolts.A second reason the flange may leak is if the seal, made of “plumber’s putty,” has failed. You will need to loosen the retaining bolts until you can see a gap around the flange. Force enough new putty in the gap, between the flange and the drain pipe, to fill in all the space. Tighten the retaining bolts.
Dispose orange peels, or any citrus rinds, to freshen the disposal and keep it smelling clean, but cut them into slices first as large pieces of citrus peel, e.g. half a lime, can jam a disposal. You can also use pieces of citrus fruit that may be too old to consume, as long as they're not too spoiled to smell nice. You can freeze these pieces first, if you wish.
Most garbage disposals are sealed using plumber’s putty. You’ll need to detach the garbage disposal, clean off the old putty and reseal. Other types of disposals use only a flange that is tightened and compressed with screws. This may need to be replaced. Either way, this can be a big job if you don’t know what you’re doing (requires removing and replacing drain pipes, as well).
If the plumber’s putty has failed, you might be able to stop the leak by replacing the putty.  To do so without removing your garbage disposal, loosen the retaining bolts until a gap forms, force the new putty between the pipe and flange, and retighten the bolts to secure the putty into place.  If this does not work, then remove your disposal unit and reseal the flange.  To do this:
Cecilia Harsch has been writing professionally since 2009. She writes mainly home improvement, health and travel articles for various online publications. She has several years of experience in the home-improvement industry, focusing on gardening, and a background in group exercise instruction. Harsch received her Certified Nurses Assistant license in 2004. She attended Tarrant County College and studied English composition.
The InSinkErator Badger 5 1/2 HP Continuous Feed Garbage Disposal features a quick-mounting system that allows for easy installation or replacement of most disposers. This garbage disposal also features a 1/2 HP motor that rapidly grinds food waste for easy rinsing down the drain. The garbage Disposal also features galvanized steel construction for durability.
The snap ring fits into a groove on the lower end of the sink flange. When you’re working under the sink, it prevents the upper mounting bracket from falling off. Removing an old snap ring can be frustrating-unless you know this trick: Starting at the break in the ring, insert a thin-blade screwdriver between the ring and the flange. Pull down on the ring with the screwdriver’s blade and walk the blade around the ring. The ring will pop right off.
Set the garbage disposal down where you can work on and see the rubber gasket. Peel off the old gasket and put the new gasket in the same place making sure that it pops into the lip and sits flat. Now you are ready to set the garbage disposer back in place. Use your knee or a helper to lift the disposal into place while looking down at it from above the sink to verify that the gasket sits flat before locking it back into place. Then look underneath the sink to make sure that all three mounting grooves are locked in. Reconnect the drains and plug the cord back in to test it for leaks.
No need to worry if your garbage disposal is on the fritz—installing a new one is a straightforward project that you can do yourself in just a few minutes. Start by switching off the power to the disposal at your home’s breaker box to ensure that you can work safely. Next, remove the old unit by detaching it from the mounting ring directly beneath the sink drain. Finally, install any necessary new mounting hardware, fit the new disposal into place, and turn on the water to test for leaks before giving it a trial run.
Manufacturers’ warranties for garbage disposals range from one year through the lifetime of the unit. One of the best warranties in the industry is the one offered by WasteKing on all of their garbage disposals. Should your disposal system fail due to material defect or mechanical effort during the purchaser’s lifetime, WasteKing will replace the unit for free. This is compliance to the policies provided for by their lifetime warranty.
Speaking of resetting your garbage disposal, sometimes that’s all you need to get the appliance up and running. However, if you constantly have to press the reset button for your garbage disposal to work, then there is an underlying problem. It may be insufficient wiring or regular wear and tear, but either way, it might be best to contact your local plumbing professional for help at this point.
Kitchen waste disposal units increase the load of organic carbon that reaches the water treatment plant, which in turn increases the consumption of oxygen.[28] Metcalf and Eddy quantified this impact as 0.04 pound of biochemical oxygen demand per person per day where disposers are used.[29] An Australian study that compared in-sink food processing to composting alternatives via a life cycle assessment found that while the in-sink disposer performed well with respect to climate change, acidification, and energy usage, it did contribute to eutrophication and toxicity potentials.[30]
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