Replacing a failed garbage disposer can seem daunting. There's the usual trepidation about electricity and water, the unfamiliar sink connection and enough drain fittings to make leaks a real possibility. Then there are the hassles of comparison shopping and the suspicion that the job could run into real money. And finally, failed disposers don't often leak, at least not in the beginning, so it's easy to put things off.
The bulk of a food waste disposer system, which includes the seals and pipes, is located beneath the kitchen sink. Most homeowners use this space to store various items, and it is not uncommon for people to bump or jar the disposal’s pipes when reaching for an item that is in close proximity. If the pipes are struck hard enough, the pipes can shift so that they are no longer sitting properly. Retaining bolts can become loose. Pipes may move, and seals can shift into an awkward position.
Most modern kitchen sink drains are this dimension--both on the garbage disposal side and the "rinse" side. These are well made items that work very effectively. Unlike most kitchen sink stoppers that rest on top of the drain opening and extend upwards into the sink when you're doing dishes, these fit down into the large opening and seal the smaller opening above the garbage disposal or "rinse" sink drain strainer. In other words they seal the drain without extending upwards into the sink full of water.
Some higher-end units have an automatic reversing jam clearing feature. By using a slightly more-complicated centrifugal starting switch, the split-phase motor rotates in the opposite direction from the previous run each time it is started. This can clear minor jams, but is claimed to be unnecessary by some manufacturers: Since the early sixties, many disposal units have utilized swivel impellers which make reversing unnecessary.[26]

If the garbage disposal won’t turn on, then it’s probably not getting power. First, make sure it’s plugged in. It’s easy to forget that disposals have wall outlets. It’s easy to knock a plug out of an outlet accidentally, especially in a dark place like under the sink. If the disposal is plugged in, check the reset button on the bottom of the disposal unit. If the disposal requires resetting, the button will be popped out. Simply press it and try the disposal again.
After watching this video, I decided I could replace my garbage disposer myself. Honestly, I think your site completely misrepresents how VERY difficult it is to hold up a 20+ pound disposal unit firmly up against the mounting hardware as you are literally crammed under your kitchen sink and then try and somehow get all three tabs to slide into place. I was very disappointed and, after 4 nights of trying and retrying, finally just called a plumber. Please don’t show anyone lifting something that is big and heavy and make it seems as light as a feather. Shame. Shame.
Place the garbage disposal on a wide, clean work surface and locate the rubber gasket. The old gasket should be peeled off, and the new gasket should be mounted in the same spot. Take extra care to make sure that it sits flat and that it pops into the lip. Now you are ready to re-install your garbage disposal. Plug the cord back in reconnect each of the drains to make sure that there are no leaks.
In the United States, almost all garbage disposals on the market are manufactured by a handful of companies; although, many are branded under different names. For example, out of the top ten highest rated models on the market, InSinkErator makes eight of them. Whirlpool and WasteKing are the other two most well-known brands in the U.S. There are a wide range of models to choose from, ranging from basic $50.00 models to models equipped with all of the latest bells and whistles that can cost as much as $600.00. In most cases, you get what you pay for in terms of quality. Here is a brief overview of the top brands in the U.S.
This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed with features that deliver great performance. The High-Torque GrindPro Magnet Motor can grind through waste. Continuous-feed operation uses a wall switch to activate the stainless steel grinding system that is resistant to jamming and corrosion. Our sound guard design reduces noise level ...  More + Product Details Close
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