The large-capacity disposer chamber boasted by this GE The large-capacity disposer chamber boasted by this GE 1/3 HP Continuous-Feed Garbage Disposal features a cold-rolled carbon steel armature shaft and dishwasher drain connector. It also has a stainless-steel sink flange ensuring durability and providing ample space for waste disposal. The disposer harnesses the power of jam-resistant dual stainless-steel swivel ...  More + Product Details Close

To be prepared, measure the distance from the outlet to the top of each disposal before you remove the old unit. If the new unit’s outlet is lower, you must also lower the tee that the discharge pipe connects to. Loosen the two nuts that connect the tee to the tailpiece above and the trap below. Try lowering the tee to see if the tailpiece is long enough. If it’s not, you’ll have to replace it with one that’s slightly longer.
Español: limpiar un triturador de basura, Português: Limpar um Triturador de Alimentos, Italiano: Pulire un Tritarifiuti da Lavandino, Deutsch: Den Küchenabfallzerkleinerer reinigen, Français: nettoyer votre broyeur d'évier, 中文: 清洁垃圾处理器, Русский: почистить утилизатор отходов, Bahasa Indonesia: Membersihkan Saluran Pembuangan Sampah, Nederlands: Je afvalvermaler schoonmaken, العربية: تنظيف مصرف النفايات

We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
I found a vertical crack, about 1 inch long, along the upper part of the disposal housing. The unit, an insinkerator badger 9, is from 2010. When water goes through the unit, a small amount will drip. The amount of water is actually quite limited, even when using lots of water to wash dishes. The unit is obviously old, but seems to work fine otherwise. What are your recommendations? Replace? or just catch the dripping water (1 table spoon per day).

First, is it loud or quiet? It really depends on which review you read, apparently. I believe it depends on more than that, such as what kind of sink is it being installed under - a stainless steel or a porcelain coated cast iron sink? One is very thin and flexible and will not block out as much noise or damp vibrations as effectively as a heavy cast iron sink. I have found the overall noise level to be a lot like the Badger 5 that I replaced. My wife thinks it sounds a bit different but neither louder nor quieter. It also depends on whether this is your first disposer (it is certainly louder than not having one) or a replacement. Bottom line, it's typically run for a few seconds, with the water running too, as you are cleaning up after meal (not in the middle of the night when everyone's trying to sleep) and it's no louder or quieter than the rest. I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor unless you have different criteria. If so, you can pay twice as much for that other "Elite" one by another manufacturer that is CR-rated as the quietest one. In my case I couldn't justify the added cost.

Cecilia Harsch has been writing professionally since 2009. She writes mainly home improvement, health and travel articles for various online publications. She has several years of experience in the home-improvement industry, focusing on gardening, and a background in group exercise instruction. Harsch received her Certified Nurses Assistant license in 2004. She attended Tarrant County College and studied English composition.

Garbage Disposal Repair

×