If the leak occurred in either of the two connections (smaller = dishwasher, larger = sewer) exiting the side of your disposal unit, it’s a pretty straightforward fix. Loosen the metal clamps on these hoses and make sure the rubber gaskets inside are not falling apart. If needed, replace these gaskets. Reattach the hoses and re-clamp the connections with new metal clamps.
Speaking of resetting your garbage disposal, sometimes that’s all you need to get the appliance up and running. However, if you constantly have to press the reset button for your garbage disposal to work, then there is an underlying problem. It may be insufficient wiring or regular wear and tear, but either way, it might be best to contact your local plumbing professional for help at this point.
If you’re like most people who cook, your kitchen probably looks like a disaster zone after preparing a meal for your family and eating it. The cleanup process is going to go much more quickly if you can stuff leftover food waste down the drain. Most garbage disposals have a switch located near the kitchen sink. All that you have to do is turn the faucet’s cold water on, flip the switch, and put the remaining leftovers in the drain.

Your old discharge tube probably won’t be the right length for your new disposal. If it’s too long, simply connect it to the disposal, mark it and cut it with a hacksaw for your garbage disposal installation. (Loosen the other pipe connections, if necessary, to insert the tube back into the tee.) If the old discharge tube is too short, you may have to make a time-wasting trip to the store. To avoid this, make sure the new garbage disposal installation kit includes a tube, or buy one separately at the same time for about $3.

In the event that you do not have a grounded outlet to power the garbage disposal, you will need to install one. Adding a grounded outlet may cost as little as $5 when existing electrical wiring is placed a short distance away, plus an additional $75 for the electrician's labor. If a new grounded outlet needs to be added and electrical wiring does not yet exist, it will likely cost around $90, depending on labor and parts. If your project requires the addition of a new switch and wire, plan to spend an average of $5 to $10 on materials, plus about 30 minutes of labor at an average cost of $75 an hour.
After using the lowest cost disposers for over 20 years now, I find the newest models have not withstood regular use for more than 5 years. The older models had a blue housing where this next step-up model has a black housing which I am hoping for at least 5 years use. Our oldest (blue housing) disposers have lasted at least 5 years and some are now almost 20 years old.
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The metal sink flange that sits directly inside the sink drain is typically sealed around the top with plumber’s putty (a clay-like sealant) and then secured from under the sink with bolts. If the plumber’s putty deteriorates, or the bolts loosen, the flange can no longer form a watertight seal between the sink drain and the disposal—which could cause a leak at the top of the unit.
Built-in trash compactors fit snuggly into your kitchen cabinetry. Having a built-in compactor means you have one less appliance occupying precious floor space. A convenient toe pedal opener lifts the top open for easy hands-free opening, and a removable drawer make it easy to clean and empty the compactor. Shop for new garbage disposals and trash compactors from JCPenney today!
One of the handiest appliances in your kitchen is probably something that you don’t think about very often, until it stops working. It’s your garbage disposer, and today I’m going to show you how to replace a garbage disposer under your kitchen sink. This project requires some moderate do-it-yourself skills, and it also requires turning off the electricity to the disposer at the electrical panel. But it’s really not that difficult, so let’s get started.
This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed with features that deliver great performance. The High-Torque GrindPro Magnet Motor can grind through waste. Continuous-feed operation uses a wall switch to activate the stainless steel grinding system that is resistant to jamming and corrosion. Our sound guard design reduces noise level ...  More + Product Details Close
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