I've always had Insinkerator garbage disposals so I just didn't know any better but now I do. Simply put, this is truly the king of garbage disposals. The amount of power it has is ridiculous and it will tear through just about any food I've thrown at it. Now, I have been hesitant to test it with some tougher items (I've heard stories of people feeding it chicken and rib bones) because I was always taught to be careful what you put down the disposal (a cheap wimpy unit in a relative's shore house seizes up with unpopped corn kernels and their home unit clogged with shredded zucchini). I have given it some things like apple cores though with absolutely no problem. I never would have put an apple core down my old Insinkerator. This king eats the core in about 3-5 seconds, if that. Completely gone. The thing that absolutely astounds me about this unit though is how QUIET it is. It's almost ridiculous. My old one, and most everyone else's I've ever heard sounds like an electric chain saw. This one sounds like someone is humming. When people come over I run it form them just to show off how quiet it is. I know. I'm weird. Add to that a lifetime warranty and this thing just cannot be beat for the money. Google it yourself and you will see how many people agree that this is the best value disposal available. The cheap Insinkerators will normally run you about $80. It's not that much more to get one of these and the benefits for the small price increase are totally worth it. For 50% more you get way more than a 50% better disposal. Of course you could spend $350 on the Insinkerator Elite but is that one going to be 300% better. I doubt it. If you found this review helpful please click yes below.
I have a Bosch condenser dryer that heats up and after 3-5 mins cuts out (no lights/power). After is cools a while, the machine can be restarted and runs a while longer until it shuts down again. This process repeats several times, with each progressive drying cycle being a little longer than the previous until the clothes are eventually dry.I've tested the the thermal-protector for continuity and the NTC-sensor on the heating element appears to be fine (tested for resistance). Could it be a faulty sensor/component on the control board that's getting too hot and cutting out the power? And if so, can it be easily identified/replaced, or would I need to replace the whole control board?Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Most garbage disposals are sealed using plumber’s putty. You’ll need to detach the garbage disposal, clean off the old putty and reseal. Other types of disposals use only a flange that is tightened and compressed with screws. This may need to be replaced. Either way, this can be a big job if you don’t know what you’re doing (requires removing and replacing drain pipes, as well).
If there is no item stuck in the blades of the disposal obtain the Allen wrench that should be attached to your disposal or that came with it. There is a breaker socket located on the bottom of most disposal brands. Place the Allen wrench in the breaker socket and turn it back and forth. By doing this you may be able to unlock the source of the problem. Just be certain that the disposal is not turned on when doing this.
I found a vertical crack, about 1 inch long, along the upper part of the disposal housing. The unit, an insinkerator badger 9, is from 2010. When water goes through the unit, a small amount will drip. The amount of water is actually quite limited, even when using lots of water to wash dishes. The unit is obviously old, but seems to work fine otherwise. What are your recommendations? Replace? or just catch the dripping water (1 table spoon per day).
Lay the disposal on its side under the sink so you can make the electrical connections. Make sure the circuit breaker is off. Remove the plate on the bottom of the disposal to expose the wiring and use wire connectors to connect the wires from the disposal to the matching wires from the power supply. Finally, secure the power cord to the bottom of the disposal using the proper connection. Replace the plate to cover the wires. (See Fig 6)
If you’re like most people who cook, your kitchen probably looks like a disaster zone after preparing a meal for your family and eating it. The cleanup process is going to go much more quickly if you can stuff leftover food waste down the drain. Most garbage disposals have a switch located near the kitchen sink. All that you have to do is turn the faucet’s cold water on, flip the switch, and put the remaining leftovers in the drain.
Speaking of resetting your garbage disposal, sometimes that’s all you need to get the appliance up and running. However, if you constantly have to press the reset button for your garbage disposal to work, then there is an underlying problem. It may be insufficient wiring or regular wear and tear, but either way, it might be best to contact your local plumbing professional for help at this point.
Determine whether there's an Allen-wrench port at the bottom of the disposal, which is located under the sink. If there is, insert an Allen-wrench into the port and turn it back and forth to move the masher plate and dislodge the glass. If you can't find an Allen-wrench port, insert the handle of a broom or a hammer into the top of the garbage disposal and wiggle it around to try to dislodge the glass.

One of the handiest appliances in your kitchen is probably something that you don’t think about very often, until it stops working. It’s your garbage disposer, and today I’m going to show you how to replace a garbage disposer under your kitchen sink. This project requires some moderate do-it-yourself skills, and it also requires turning off the electricity to the disposer at the electrical panel. But it’s really not that difficult, so let’s get started.
The L-2600 garbage disposal unit is one of the brand’s best-sellers. Its glass-filled nylon grinding chamber allows a smoother and more quiet performance as opposed to a full stainless steel model. It’s also easy to install and doesn’t take up too much space. It even comes with a removable splash guard to keep all the food scraps down when disposing them.
However, homeowners are often cautioned against using caustic drain cleaners. Some professional plumber believe that it will not always remove clogs and may even be quite harmful. The caustic nature of this and similar products should be a cause for concern because aside from not really needing it, the ingredients known as lye or caustic soda can result in severe burns and may cause damage to the pipes.
We have an annoying habit of letting the sink fill with dishes (I know *I* surely don't contribute to such, so it must be everyone else). Occasionally, the disposal backs up if you don't run it, so the sink begins to fill with water. When that happens, you can't see if there is any flatware in the bottom of the sink to get sucked down and chewed up. By sitting down in the drain, the Disposal Genie keeps that from happening, while letting you still run most of your scraps into the disposal.
While it certainly isn’t always necessary to replace your disposal just because you’re getting a new sink or updating your kitchen appliances, it may be a good time to do so, especially if your unit is over ten years old. Since you already have professionals on the site, it may be more cost efficient and convenient to go ahead and replace an older unit instead of waiting for it to fail at a future date.

The good news is that a leaking gasket can be easily replaced. Most home improvement or local hardware stores will carry them, and they are usually inexpensive. However, depending on the particular model of your garbage disposal, it may require a specially fitted rubber gasket. To ensure that you get the right gasket the first time, write down your garbage disposal’s model number, take it to the store, and ask an employee to match it up for you.
Hot water, a good degreasing soap and a terrycloth rag. Try 409 degreaser and let it sit a few minutes, then run hot water on the cloth, add soap and rub the flange on top and underneath. There are commercial brushes available, but brushes don't always de-grease well. They are, however, very useful for cleaning crevices. Regular cleaning makes this job much easier.
We’ve Gone Paperless: During the last few years, the City has introduced new technologies that have encouraged employees to use electronic records whenever possible. The City Council reads and reviews their Agendas and related documents online, records are kept in an electronic format, and employees are encouraged to utilize shared networks to collaborate on projects and documents rather than printing drafts. Reducing paper usage not only helps our environment, but also saves money for office supplies.

3. Is my plumbing capable of handling the task? If your current plumbing frequently clogs or backs up, then you should NOT install a new garbage disposer. The additional waste that a garbage disposal creates will only increase the chances of one or both happening. Before installing a waste disposer, you’ll need to have the source of the problem identified and fixed.

Avoid getting grease in your drain. It is not a good idea to pour any kind of oil, grease or fat into your garbage disposal. The grease can accumulate in the disposal unit, slowing down the motor and lining the pipes, causing the drain to clog. Try to wipe off as much grease as possible from pans and roasting tins using paper towel, before rinsing.


Release the old disposal from the mounting ring. At the top of the unit you should see a thin metal ring with 3 separate lugs, or protruding arms. Take hold of these lugs with one hand and twist the entire ring counterclockwise about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) to dislodge the old unit. Set it aside on a sheet of newspaper or unfolded rag to keep from making a mess.[4]

I think those are all the important items I wanted to share. The removal of the old one, cleaning the sink hole, and putting in the new box took about 35 minutes start to finish. I wasn't rushing but I was well prepared and had everything ready to go. Plumbers Putty was needed for install. Make sure you have that on hand. There was a thin rubber gasket that went under the flange (between the top flange and a stainless steel sink) that I didn't use because I didn't have a stainless steel sink. The one tricky thing I recall from the directions is that the same procedure is repeated twice in a couple of places - one for using the existing Badger mounting hardware and one for if you are using the EZ Mount system. If you are using the EZ Mount, make sure to SKIP the paragraph that is describing the work as it applies to the Badger mount. That's about it. I had to cut 3/4" off the black waste discharge pipe (90 degree elbow piece that screws into the new disposal) so that everything fit with my old plumbing. I loosened up all the slip joints on the old plumbing so I could wiggle things around as needed, aligned everything, and tightened the plumbing back up. New install was completed in well under 20 minutes after the removal and outlet installation.
Badger food waste disposers are a reliable and Badger food waste disposers are a reliable and functional choice when affordability is the prime concern. Badger 5XP features a 3/4 horsepower heavy-duty quiet Dura-Drive induction motor rugged galvanized steel construction for disposer durability and a space-saving compact design. To top it off Badger 5XP offers a 3-year We Come ...  More + Product Details Close
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