This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed This Frigidaire 1/2 HP Garbage Disposal is designed with features that deliver great performance. The High-Torque GrindPro Magnet Motor can grind through waste. Continuous-feed operation uses a wall switch to activate the stainless steel grinding system that is resistant to jamming and corrosion. Our sound guard design reduces noise level ...  More + Product Details Close
Manufactured in the United States, Waste King garbage disposals have won much praise for their energy efficient design. Waste King offers a wide range of garbage disposers for both residential and commercial settings. In the early 2000s, Waste King refocused their sights on providing unparalleled customer service and quality products, and their warranties are the current industry standard that others are measured by.
Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.

Modern garbage disposal units connect to dishwasher drainpipes.  This enables dishwashers to expel leftover food scraps and residue that would otherwise accumulate in the dishwasher unit.  A common source of leaks is the area where your dishwasher and garbage disposal connect.  These leaks most often occur when the hose’s clamp is not secure enough and when the dishwasher hose cracks.  To fix this issue, simply replace the cracked section of the hose or tighten the clamp.


Waste King L-8000: 1 horsepower garbage disposal with pre-installed power cord and sound insulation. Energy efficient permanent magnet motor and stainless steel swivel impellers reduce jamming. Fast and easy to install with a removable splashguard that is easy to clean and replace. Rust and corrosion-proof glass-filled nylon grind chamber and drain housing with stainless steel grinding components. Continuous feed technology. Front-mounted reset button for easy use. Safe to use with properly-sized septic tanks.
Turn off the garbage disposal at the breaker box. Remove the drain pipe if it is leaking there. Most attachment clamps are wire clamps with two protruding wires that are pushed together to release the drain pipe. Push the wires together and remove the clamp. Pull the pipe off and inspect the seal for any debris that may have lodged between the seal and the pipe. Wipe the seal with a damp rag to remove any dirt, debris or food particles. Sometimes the wire clamp loses tension. In that case, tighten the hose clamp down in its place, which may secure the pipe leak-free.

Kitchen waste appliances are necessary for every home. You are able to quickly get rid of all types of waste with ease. First thing’s first, which type is better for your home – a trash compactor or garbage disposal? Many people think the terms are interchangeable, but they function in two different capacities. A disposal is great for getting rid softer food wastes, such as mashed potatoes, veggies, noodles, and rice. Harder to grind foods, such as chicken bones, vegetable peels and egg shells, are best suited for a stainless steel trash compactor. You can even place plastic and glass bottles in the compactor.
InSinkErator is a brand name that is well-known for their design and manufacturing of waste disposal systems and instant hot water dispensers. John Hammes founded the company in 1927 in Racine, Wisconsin, where their headquarters remain today. Hammes is credited with designing and producing the first “in sink” waste disposal system, and the InSinkErator is a play on the word “incinerator”. Currently, InSinkErator produces and markets garbage disposal systems under the Evolution and Badger Series brand names.
Lift the sink flange from the top of the sink. Use a plastic putty knife to scrape off the old plumber’s putty around the top of the flange, then wipe off any putty residue with a damp rag. Grab a palmful of plumber’s putty from the container and roll it into an eighth-inch to quarter-inch-wide “rope” with a length roughly equal to the circumference of the flange. Wrap the rope of putty around the top of the flange like a collar, then insert the flange into the sink drain opening until snug. Re-install the mounting assembly and mounting ring (taking care to securely tighten the mounting bolts on the mounting assembly), then re-attach the garbage disposal, drain pipe, and dishwasher hose in the reverse order you detached them.

Abt carries both types of garbage disposal systems, continuous and batch feed. Continuous feed disposers are turned on and off with a power switch. They usually have a shield surrounding the hole in the sink so things do not come back out while being ground for disposal. Some continuous feed disposals have a reverse setting to help reduce jamming. Batch feed disposals operate when a lid is engaged, making them safer. They are a good option for families with children because food is unable to fly out of the sink. Batch feed food waste disposals are usually more expensive than the continuous feed disposals.
First, is it loud or quiet? It really depends on which review you read, apparently. I believe it depends on more than that, such as what kind of sink is it being installed under - a stainless steel or a porcelain coated cast iron sink? One is very thin and flexible and will not block out as much noise or damp vibrations as effectively as a heavy cast iron sink. I have found the overall noise level to be a lot like the Badger 5 that I replaced. My wife thinks it sounds a bit different but neither louder nor quieter. It also depends on whether this is your first disposer (it is certainly louder than not having one) or a replacement. Bottom line, it's typically run for a few seconds, with the water running too, as you are cleaning up after meal (not in the middle of the night when everyone's trying to sleep) and it's no louder or quieter than the rest. I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor unless you have different criteria. If so, you can pay twice as much for that other "Elite" one by another manufacturer that is CR-rated as the quietest one. In my case I couldn't justify the added cost.
Dishwasher Connection: Some disposals are connected to the dishwasher drain pipe, which drains leftover food removed from dishes going through the wash cycle. Leaks can sometimes occur in the hose connections where the disposal hose attaches to the dishwasher.Leaks can also happen if the seal on the hose is compromised or the clamp on the hose isn’t tight enough. If the connecting hose seems to be the source of the leak, try tightening the connection or replacing the seal. If neither solutions work, or the hose is obviously cracked, you will need to replace the hose.

3/4th Horsepower – This garbage disposal model is ideal for households of 4-5 people. It is the model that you will most commonly find in modern day homes. These models are often equipped with more sound dampening features, which reduce the level of noise the unit produces when compared to its lower end cousins. Again, it is recommended that you look for a model with stainless steel grinding components.
Turn off the garbage disposal at the breaker box. Remove the drain pipe if it is leaking there. Most attachment clamps are wire clamps with two protruding wires that are pushed together to release the drain pipe. Push the wires together and remove the clamp. Pull the pipe off and inspect the seal for any debris that may have lodged between the seal and the pipe. Wipe the seal with a damp rag to remove any dirt, debris or food particles. Sometimes the wire clamp loses tension. In that case, tighten the hose clamp down in its place, which may secure the pipe leak-free.
Flange: The flange is the uppermost portion of the garbage disposal, where the disposal and the sink drain meet. The flange can develop a leak for a variety of reasons. Check that all the mounting bolts, typically there are three, are tight enough. Snug the bolts up with a wrench if you see water dripping from any of the bolts, being careful not to overtighten the bolts.A second reason the flange may leak is if the seal, made of “plumber’s putty,” has failed. You will need to loosen the retaining bolts until you can see a gap around the flange. Force enough new putty in the gap, between the flange and the drain pipe, to fill in all the space. Tighten the retaining bolts.
Disposals can leak at a couple different places. Start by turning off the disposal at its base. Then, find the disposal mount and remove the unit by turning it counterclockwise from the bottom. Once the disposal has been removed from the mount, you should be able to see the three mounting bolts. Tighten these bolts to make sure they’re not leaking.

Even though a leaking garbage disposal is a fairly simple fix, there can be a few factors that can complicate the process somewhat. For example, there are a few different places within the connection system that may spring a leak, so often the hardest part of fixing a leaking garbage disposal is trying to determine where the leak is coming from.Aside from the obvious connections, possible areas for leaks include water inlets and outlets as well as rings and seals.

Once you have a garbage disposer installed, maintenance is what keeps your unit going. By following this link, you will find a very easy to follow video which details some simple steps to help keep your disposal unit clean, and your kitchen free of bad smells and harmful bacteria. You see, my website isn’t just about telling you to buy this model or that right now or you’ll miss out on some good deals (although I have mentioned a couple of places you can take a look at if you’re interested), it’s about making sure you get the best from your garbage disposer.


Use a wet-dry vacuum cleaner to remove any smaller shards of glass. Simply hold the opening of the hose over the top of the garbage disposal and allow the vacuum to run until you can't hear anything be sucked up anymore. If the sink isn't particularly wet, you can use a regular vacuum, covering the end of the extension tube with a nylon stocking secured with a rubber band.
A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.
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