Determine whether there's an Allen-wrench port at the bottom of the disposal, which is located under the sink. If there is, insert an Allen-wrench into the port and turn it back and forth to move the masher plate and dislodge the glass. If you can't find an Allen-wrench port, insert the handle of a broom or a hammer into the top of the garbage disposal and wiggle it around to try to dislodge the glass.
Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.
Look for a jam. Something too tough to grind, such as a piece of glass, could be jamming the motor. Turn off the power and water, then unplug the disposal. (If it’s hardwired, turn off the breaker.) Remove the rubber baffle inside the drain-most just lift out-and shine a flashlight into the hole. Fish out the obstruction with a pair of tongs or needle-nose pliers.
What's up with that scary loud noise when you turn it on? There are some reviews that make this sound like it is eating a spoon (a LOUD, disturbing, and/or startling snap or click noise, etc.). I have to say that was one of my biggest reservations when I ordered this thing, having read the reviews. A fairly large slice of reviewers commented negatively on it. Here's my take... The motor is 3/4 HP compared to my little dinky 1/3 HP motor on my old one. That is a lot more horsepower and, consequently, a lot more torque. The little "teeth" that do the waste grinding that sit in the base of the chamber spin freely. When you turn it on, the little grinders snap into place like how your head gets whipped back on one of those crazy spinning carnival rides. It's just from centrifugal force setting the blades into place. The fine print in the directions tell you that it is part of the anti-jam mechanism. It's not startling or even disconcerting to me or my wife. We didn't blink an eye. I couldn't scare my children by turning it on. It just makes a bit of a click when you turn it on. No biggie. Full disclosure here - ours is mounted to the bottom of a heavy, porcelain coated cast iron sink. Our sink may be better at handling the torque and may dampen the sound and vibration more than a thin stainless steel sink. Our sink weighs probably 75 pounds. A stainless steel sink weighs 7 pounds. A heavier sink can probably handle a garbage disposal operating under full load better than a flexible, lightweight sink. That's not why we got the sink but I think it's probably a benefit to damping sounds and vibrations.
In recent years, various Camorra clans have been forming alliances with Nigerian drug gangs and the Albanian mafia, even going so far as to intermarry.[citation needed] For instance, Augusto La Torre, the former La Torre clan boss who became a pentito, is married to an Albanian woman. It should also be noted that the first foreign pentito, a Tunisian, admitted to being involved with the feared Casalesi clan of Casal di Principe. The first town that the Camorra gave over to be completely governed by a foreign clan was Castel Volturno, which was given to the Rapaces, clans from Lagos and Benin City in Nigeria. This allowed them to traffic cocaine and women in sexual slavery before sending them across the whole of Europe.[33]
To remove the gasket and replace it you will first have to disconnect the drain and unplug the cord to the garbage disposal. Also, if you have a dishwasher you will have to remove the dishwasher drain hose from the garbage disposal. With the drains and cord removed you can now take hold of the sides of the mounting nut and twist it counter clockwise to unlock the garbage disposal. The disposal should drop straight down.
Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.
There you have it. If you have questions about this or any other home improvement project, be sure to read our list of Frequently Asked Questions for this video. And be sure to print out our Project Instructions, which includes a Tools and Materials checklist, before visiting your local independent home improvement retailer. That’s where you’ll find all the products and helpful advice to complete your project. If you’re not sure where to find your local store, check out our Store Locator.

Designed to effectively grind your daily food scraps, the compact InSinkErator Badger 5 garbage disposal is the reliable choice when affordability and space are prime considerations. Featuring a powerful, 1/2 horsepower, Dura-Drive induction motor, there are no wearable parts to deliver consistent, maintenance-free performance year after year. It features a patented Quick Lock sink mount that allows for easy installation and disposal replacement. The functional Badger 5 includes an exclusive "We Come to You" 2-Year In-Home Limited Warranty.
While it certainly isn’t always necessary to replace your disposal just because you’re getting a new sink or updating your kitchen appliances, it may be a good time to do so, especially if your unit is over ten years old. Since you already have professionals on the site, it may be more cost efficient and convenient to go ahead and replace an older unit instead of waiting for it to fail at a future date.
After you install the new sink flange, you don’t want it shifting around when you’re assembling the parts underneath. Movement of the flange could break the seal between the flange and the sink, inviting a leak. Your best bet is to ask a helper to press down on the sink flange, or if you’re working alone, find something to weigh it down, such as the old disposal. Place an old towel under the weight so you don’t scratch the sink. If the bottom of your sink is quite concave, the old disposal might not contact the flange. In that case, place a can on the flange, then weigh down the can.
Leaks can also happen at the dishwasher connection and the discharge drainpipe. The dishwasher connection may simply need the clamp tightened or need a replacement hose. For the drainpipe, tightening the bolts may help, but if that doesn’t work, the gasket may need to be replaced. No matter the situation, it is best to give us at John Moore a call rather than trying to replace these things yourself to make sure it is done correctly and to make sure the problem doesn’t get even worse.
A garbage disposal unit (also known as a garbage disposal, waste disposal unit, garbage disposer, or in Canadian English a garburator) is a device, usually electrically powered, installed under a kitchen sink between the sink's drain and the trap. The disposal unit shreds food waste into pieces small enough—generally less than 2 mm (0.079 in)—to pass through plumbing.[1]
The majority of today’s garbage disposals are designed to dovetail with a sink’s drain outlet, which makes connecting the two components simple. There are a multitude of connection kits and adaptors available. Many models feature a power cord that is simply plugged into a nearby outlet to power the unit; however, when an outlet is not available, the unit must be hardwired, which can be significantly more expensive.

Waste King L-8000: 1 horsepower garbage disposal with pre-installed power cord and sound insulation. Energy efficient permanent magnet motor and stainless steel swivel impellers reduce jamming. Fast and easy to install with a removable splashguard that is easy to clean and replace. Rust and corrosion-proof glass-filled nylon grind chamber and drain housing with stainless steel grinding components. Continuous feed technology. Front-mounted reset button for easy use. Safe to use with properly-sized septic tanks.
Disposers range between $45 and $250, and most hold up fairly well under normal use. It's common for a $50, 1/3-hp disposer with a 1-year warranty to last 10 to 12 years. So what does more money buy? Increased longevity, longer warranties, more power and less aggravation. The better units have stainless steel components, auto-reversing starts and bigger motors. Units that reverse direction with each start greatly reduce stoppages, while larger motors can chew through larger and more varied food loads.

See The Drain Strainer™ with Crown Adapter installation instructions and dimensions (or the XL installation instructions and dimensions below for taller sinks) below to see the actual dimensions for each model. The legs can adjust up to an additional 5 inches and you can add as many sets of 6 inch leg extensions as needed to achieve the proper total height.
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Garbage disposals can range from $70 on the low end to $380 on the high end -- and generally speaking, you get what you pay for. A less expensive unit is likely to produce more noise, require more water, and clog more easily than a higher-end model. Likewise, a more expensive unit will be faster, quieter and less likely to malfunction than a lower end model -- and it will be lighter-weight and offer greater capacity as well. The average cost of a garbage disposal installation with a one-year manufacturer’'s warranty is $185. The average amount of time taken to install a garbage disposal, including cleanup, is three hours. The hourly cost for labor will range from $20 to $40 -- $28 on average.
If the leak occurred in either of the two connections (smaller = dishwasher, larger = sewer) exiting the side of your disposal unit, it’s a pretty straightforward fix. Loosen the metal clamps on these hoses and make sure the rubber gaskets inside are not falling apart. If needed, replace these gaskets. Reattach the hoses and re-clamp the connections with new metal clamps.
We’re starting with clogs because they’re actually only *kind of* garbage disposal problems. Technically, garbage disposals can get jammed (see below!), but if water stands in your sink and takes forever to drain, it’s probably because the kitchen sink pipe has been clogged. Many different materials can cause clogs, from sediment, to scale, to grease, to food remains. Depending on the culprit, clogs may begin to smell. Ideally, your garbage disposal should have ground up debris enough that it wouldn’t clog anything up, but nobody’s perfect.

Typically, garbage disposals usually last anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Well manufactured units may even last longer than that. If you’re really looking to save some money, you can always disconnect your unit, dissect it, seal the crack and reattach it. However, this is just a temporary fix. If you have the money, it’s best just to invest in a new unit.


If you have a broken seal on the inside of your garbage disposal, you will see leaking coming from the bottom of your unit. Leaks that come from the bottom of your garbage disposal are usually attributed to cracks on the inside of the device. This is due to basic wear and tear overtime. To fix this issue, you’ll need simply invest in a new garbage disposal.
There is a contradiction among some of the brands. InSinkErator’s disposal instruction manual states, “Don’t grind large amounts of egg shells or fibrous materials like corn husks, artichokes, etc, to avoid possible drain blockage.” Whirlpool’s disposal instruction manual states, “designed to dispose of food wastes including bones, fruit and vegetable wastes, pits, egg shells and coffee grounds.”
After watching this video, I decided I could replace my garbage disposer myself. Honestly, I think your site completely misrepresents how VERY difficult it is to hold up a 20+ pound disposal unit firmly up against the mounting hardware as you are literally crammed under your kitchen sink and then try and somehow get all three tabs to slide into place. I was very disappointed and, after 4 nights of trying and retrying, finally just called a plumber. Please don’t show anyone lifting something that is big and heavy and make it seems as light as a feather. Shame. Shame.
If the disposal is plugged in and doesn’t need to be reset, then you should check the circuit breaker. The breaker could be flipped, which would mean your disposal isn’t getting power. If that’s still not the problem, then either the outlet is dead, the circuit breaker is malfunctioning, or the disposal needs to be replaced. Check the outlet first by plugging something else into it. If the outlet works, try replacing the circuit breaker switch. If that isn’t it either, you have to replace the disposal.
Lift the sink flange from the top of the sink. Use a plastic putty knife to scrape off the old plumber’s putty around the top of the flange, then wipe off any putty residue with a damp rag. Grab a palmful of plumber’s putty from the container and roll it into an eighth-inch to quarter-inch-wide “rope” with a length roughly equal to the circumference of the flange. Wrap the rope of putty around the top of the flange like a collar, then insert the flange into the sink drain opening until snug. Re-install the mounting assembly and mounting ring (taking care to securely tighten the mounting bolts on the mounting assembly), then re-attach the garbage disposal, drain pipe, and dishwasher hose in the reverse order you detached them.

A high-torque, insulated electric motor, usually rated at 250–750 W (1⁄3–1 hp)[22] for a domestic unit, spins a circular turntable mounted horizontally above it. Induction motors rotate at 1,400–1,800 rpm and have a range of starting torques, depending on the method of starting used. The added weight and size of induction motors may be of concern, depending on the available installation space and construction of the sink bowl. Universal motors, also known as series-wound motors, rotate at higher speeds, have high starting torque, and are usually lighter, but are noisier than induction motors, partially due to the higher speeds and partially because the commutator brushes rub on the slotted commutator.[23][24] Inside the grinding chamber there is a rotating metal turntable onto which the food waste drops. Two swiveling metal impellers mounted on top of the plate near the edge then fling the food waste against the grind ring repeatedly. Sharp cutting edges in the grind ring break down the waste until it is small enough to pass through openings in the ring, whereupon it is flushed down the drain.
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